Council of Representatives Approved Minutes:August 3 & 6, 2000

I. MINUTES OF MEETING

A.(1) Council voted to approve the minutes of the February 25-27, 2000, Council of Representatives meeting.

II. ELECTIONS, AWARDS, MEMBERSHIP AND HUMAN RESOURCES

A.(2) Council voted to direct all directorates and governance groups to identify strategies specific to that directorate or governance group and implement appropriate mechanisms that will provide opportunities for newcomers (those who have not previously served on the Council of Representatives or a board or committee, with the exception of APAGS) to participate in governance. One of these mechanisms might be to propose a slate comprised solely of members who haven't previously served on the Council of Representatives or a board or committee, with the exception of APAGS.

B.(3) Council voted to approve the establishment of a task force to be appointed by the President to consider methods of providing that each division and state association have at least one seat on Council. Council requested that the task force come back to Council with a recommendation in February 2001.

C.(3A) Council voted to elect 126 Members to initial Fellow status on the nomination of the indicated divisions and on the recommendation of the Membership Committee and the Board of Directors.

D.(15B) Council voted to approve the inclusion of $27,000 in the 2001 Preliminary Budget for the establishment of a Task Force on Membership Retention and Recruitment assigned to formulate a systematic plan to foster the retention of members and appropriate outreach to nonmembers. The Task Force, to be composed of up to 15 people to be appointed by the President, will hold conference calls in 2000 and up to 2 meetings in 2001.

E.(40) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "Creation of a New Membership Category."

F.(41) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "New Criteria for Dues-Exempt Status."

G.(42) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "New Member Slates for Committees."

III. ETHICS

A.(16) Council voted to approve the following resolution and the inclusion of $3,300 in the 2001 Preliminary Budget for the funding of one additional seat on the ECTF for the constituency of Policy and Public Safety, Correctional or Military Psychology:

Whereas the current makeup of the APA's Ethics Committee has no representation from the areas of Police and Public Safety Psychology or Correctional Psychology (areas of specialization reflected by sections in Division 18) nor Military Psychology (Division 19) nor demonstrated expertise in these areas of endeavor;

Whereas the current Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct is silent on many critical issues faced by psychologists who work in these areas and look to the principles and code and to the Ethics Committee for guidance;

And Whereas the issues they face include consultations with immediate life or death outcomes (hostage negotiations, timing of interventions in the presence of SWAT Teams, dual roles by regulation in prison riot situations), coaching of interrogators during investigative interrogation, development of profiles for investigative purposes, and special situations involving confidentiality and prescribed dual roles (working with military clients and their dependents);

Be it resolved that the membership of the task force working on revision of the Ethical Principles and Code of Conduct be expanded to include at least one seat on the ECTF for this constituency.

B.(33) Council received an update regarding recent activities concerning the Ethics Code revision.

C.(33A) Council received information regarding proposed changes to Ethics Adjudication.

IV. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

A.(4) Council voted to approve the following revised Guidelines for Council Resolutions:

GUIDELINES FOR COUNCIL RESOLUTIONS

These guidelines apply to all resolutions submitted to Council for consideration. The following information must be provided: (1) The purpose and rationale for the resolution stated clearly, and documenting its relevance to psychology or psychologists; (2) The issue's importance to psychology or to society as a whole; (3) Representative scientific or empirical findings related to the resolution; (4) The likelihood of the resolution having a constructive impact on public opinion or policy.

Resolutions approved by Council are understood to reflect what APA values or believes and, in most cases, does not commit APA to any action. If approval of the resolution requires that specific action be taken, the following information must also be provided: (5) Suggestions on how it should be implemented, if it is passed; (6) Breakdown of staff resources or association funds needed to implement the resolution.

B.(4A) Council voted to approve the withdrawal of new business item 23D, "Policy Manual."

C.(17) Council voted to reject a motion requesting that members of CSFC who aren't already serving on Council be reimbursed to attend Council meetings.

D.(18) Council discussed the item "Adding Health to APA's mission statement."

E.(32A) The new business item "Council Resolution on Resolutions and Motions" was referred to the Committee on the Structure and Function of Council (CSFC).

F.(32B) The new business item "Resolution on the Death Penalty" was referred to the Ad Hoc Committee on Legal Issues (COLI) and the Board for the Advancement of Psychology in the Public Interest (BAPPI).

G.(32E) The new business item "Turnaround Time for Council Business Items" was referred to CSFC.

H.(32G) The new business item "Systematic Notification and Review of New Business in Progress Items" was referred to CSFC.

I.(34) Council received information regarding the policy for convention expense reimbursement for APA Past Presidents.

J.(43) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "Fostering Career Development of Young Professionals."

K.(44) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "Policy Manual."

L.(45) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "Breakout Sessions at Council Meetings."

M.(46) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "P&P/Panel Recommendation of the Treasurer's Term of Office."

N. In executive session, Council reviewed the 1999 CEO Evaluation.

V. DIVISIONS AND STATE AND PROVINCIAL ASSOCIATIONS

A.(5) Council voted to approve the inclusion of $7,000 in the 2001 Preliminary Budget for a meeting regarding the Training Guidelines for Practice in Clinical Geropsychology. The meeting will be attended by: two members with expertise in drafting guidelines to be appointed by the Board of Professional Affairs, one of whom shall be a psychologist/attorney; two members appointed by the APA Interdivisional Task Force on Qualifications for Practice in Clinical and Applied Geropsychology; two members appointed by the Board of Directors to represent practice constituencies that have expressed concern regarding the guidelines; and one member of the Board of Directors. The purpose of the meeting is to review the Training Guidelines for Practice in Clinical Geropsychology and make recommendations regarding changes to the Training Guidelines to the APA Interdivisional Task Force on Qualifications for Practice in Clinical and Applied Geropsychology . The Council also voted to request that the Agenda Planning Group consider placing the Training Guidelines for Practice in Clinical Geropsychology on the Fall 2000 cross-cutting agendas to allow an opportunity for boards and committees to provide comments on the current version. The meeting to review the Training Guidelines will take place after the feedback from boards and committees is collected, with the goal of submitting the revised version of the Training Guidelines for Council's review at its February 2001 meeting.

B.(32D) The new business item "Division Petition" was referred to the Policy and Planning Board and the Committee on Division/APA Relations.

C.(47) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "Amend the APA Rule 100-2.1 for Signing Petitions for New Divisions."

VI. ORGANIZATION OF THE APA

A.(5A) In executive session, Council voted to approve the following amendments to the Association Rules (bracketed material to be deleted; underlined material to be added):

50-5. LIST OF CONTINUING COMMITTEES

50-5.1 The list below presents APA continuing committees and their reporting lines.

Reporting directly to Council

Structure and Function of Council

Reporting through the Board of Directors

Constitutional Issues

International Relations in Psychology

Investment

Advancement of Professional Practice

American Psychological Association of Graduate Students

[College of Professional Psychology]

Commission for the Recognition of Specialties and Proficiencies in Professional Psychology

Agenda Planning Group

Division/APA Relations

Reporting through the Publications and Communications Board

Council of Editors

Reporting through the Board of Educational

Accreditation

Continuing Professional Education

Education and Training Awards

Committee of Teachers of Psychology in Secondary Schools

Reporting through the Board of Professional Affairs


Professional Practice and Standards

Reporting through the Board of Scientific Affairs

Animal Research and Ethics

Psychological Tests and Assessment

Scientific Awards

Reporting through the Board for the Advancement of Psychology in the Public Interest

Women in Psychology

Psychology in the Public Interest Award

Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Concerns

Disability Issues in Psychology

Children, Youth, and Families

Ethnic Minority Affairs

Urban Initiatives

Aging

Reporting through the Committee for the Advancement of Professional Practice


Committee on Rural Health

90-2.1 COMMITTEE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE


There shall be a Committee for the Advancement of Professional Practice whose responsibility it shall be to (a) be the administrative agent of the Board of Directors exercising general governance supervision over the relevant affairs of the [Office of Professional Practice] Practice Directorate, (b) recommend to Council through the Board of Directors procedures for the [protection, defense, and] enhancement of human welfare through the professional practice of psychology, (c) identify projects important to the [protection, defense, and] enhancement of human welfare through the professional practice of psychology, and (d) recommend to the Board of Directors the needed funding for such projects.


The Committee for the Advancement of Professional Practice shall consist of nine regular members and up to two special members. The APA Treasurer shall be an ex officio, nonvoting member of the Committee. The Board of Directors may also appoint such liaisons to the Committee for Advancement of Professional Practice as it deems necessary. Regular members shall be psychologists who provide health care services, who are licensed to practice psychology in at least one state, district, or province, and who pay the annual assessment. In addition to these general qualifications, the regular members of the Committee shall possess experience in service delivery and in the governance of state and/or national psychological organizations, and will have demonstrated expertise in one or more of the following additional areas of experience: (a) advocacy (legislative or legal), (b) marketing, (c) the training of practicing psychologists, and (d) public information and education. Of the nine regular members, three shall be elected each year to serve a term of three years.


Each year, a call for nominations for the three positions that will become vacant in the following year shall be broadly disseminated. Following the call, the Committee shall forward a list, organized into three slates of five candidates each, of fifteen persons deemed qualified to the APA Board of Directors, who shall select therefrom three candidates from each slate to stand for election to the three vacancies on the Committee for the Advancement of Professional Practice. In accordance with established procedure, the Board of Directors' slates of candidates shall then be forwarded to APA Council for inclusion in Council's election of members to APA boards and committees.


In addition to regular members, the Committee for the Advancement of Professional Practice may appoint up to two special members to serve a term not to exceed two years. These special members need not be psychologists and shall be chosen for their expertise in such matters as marketing, advocacy (legislative and legal), public information and education, or such other areas of competency as shall be relevant to the mission of the Committee. Special members may be reappointed for as many terms as the Committee deems their services to be required.


The Committee for the Advancement of Professional Practice shall report to Council through the APA Board of Directors.


[90-2.2 In order to facilitate the activities and to ensure the responsiveness of the Committee for the Advancement of Professional Practice to the needs of the assessed groups, there shall be a Liaison/Consultation Group for Professional Practice, whose responsibilities it shall be to (a) serve as a liaison between the Committee for the Advancement of Professional Practice and both state, district, and provincial psychological associations and those divisions of APA that have an interest in the support and advancement of professional practice; (b) propose such initiatives for the advancement of practice as it deems vital to the profession; (c) actively assist the Committee for the Advancement of Professional Practice and the Office of Professional Practice in explaining and implementing the programs of Office of Professional Practice; and (d) serve as a resource for the review and evaluation of funding criteria and of projects proposed for funding to the Committee for the Advancement of Professional Practice. The Liaison/Consultation Group for Professional Practice shall convene at least once annually at the time of the APA annual convention and shall receive and review quarterly reports from the Office of Professional Practice and all minutes of the meetings of the Committee for the Advancement of Professional Practice.


The Liaison/Consultation Group for Professional Practice shall consist of 106 delegates and the members of the Committee for the Advancement of Professional Practice. Each state, district, and provincial psychological association affiliated with APA shall be entitled to one delegate. Each division of APA, at least 50% of whose members pay the annual assessment and are licensed to practice psychology in at least one state, district, or province shall be entitled to one delegate. The balance of the 106 seats shall be distributed to such eligible divisions on the basis of an apportionment ballot, such ballot to be provided to all APA members who pay the annual assessment and who are licensed to practice psychology in a state, district, or province. Delegates to the Liaison/Consultation Group for Professional Practice shall be selected by the affiliated state, district, or provincial association or the APA division they will represent from nominees elected by the constituency of such association or division, according to such rules as may be established by the constituent organization. Delegations to the Liaison/Consultation Group for Professional Practice shall serve three-year terms, with one-third of the body selected in any one year.]


[90-2.3 All funds generated by the annual assessment of health service psychologists shall be sequestered by the Board of Directors and, in a manner consistent with APA policy, shall be used exclusively for the support of the Office of Professional Practice, for the operation of the Committee for the Advancement of Professional Practice, and for such special projects as are recommended to the APA Board of Directors by the Committee for the Advancement of Professional Practice. This budget shall be reported in the consolidated APA annual budget.]


110-14. RULES GOVERNING SIMULTANEOUS SERVICE ON BOARDS AND COMMITTEES

110-14.1 Members shall not serve simultaneously on any of the following governance groups, except as ex-officio (non-voting) members or if other exceptions are provided below.

Boards


Advancement of Psychology in the Public Interest
Convention Affairs
Educational Affairs
Policy and Planning
Publications and Communications
Professional Affairs (except that one member is also a member

of the Committee on Professional Practice and Standards)
Scientific Affairs

Committees

Accreditation
Advancement of Professional Practice
Aging
Animal Research and Ethics
Approval of Continuing Education Sponsors
Children, Youth and Families
Continuing Professional Education
Disability Issues in Psychology
Division / APA Relations
Employment and Human Resources
Ethics
Ethnic Minority Affairs
Finance (except that two members are also members of the Investment Committee)
Investment Committee (except that two members are also

members of the Finance Committee)
International Relations in Psychology
Legal Issues (ad hoc)
Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Concerns
Membership

Professional Practice and Standards(except that one member is
also a member of the Board of Professional Affairs)
Psychology and AIDS (ad hoc)
Public Information
Rural Health
Structure and Function of Council
Psychological Tests and Assessment
Teachers of Psychology in Secondary Schools
Women in Psychology
Urban Initiatives

Other

[College of Professional Psychology]
Commission for the Recognition of Specialties and Proficiencies in Professional Psychology


110-14.2 Members shall not simultaneously run for election(e.g., appear on the board and committee election ballot) for more than one of the following governance groups. In addition, members shall not run for election for one of the following governance groups if the term of service will begin prior to the end of a term the member is currently serving on one of the governance groups listed in Association Rule 110-14.1


Boards

Advancement of Psychology in the Public Interest
Convention Affairs
Education Affairs
Policy and Planning
Publications and Communications
Professional Affairs
Scientific Affairs

Committees

Advancement of Professional Practice
Employment and Human Resources
Ethics
Finance
International Relations in Psychology
Membership
Public Information
Rural Health
Structure and Function of Council

Other

[College of Professional Psychology]
Commission for the Recognition of Specialties and Proficiencies in Professional Psychology

[130.5 COLLEGE OF PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY


There shall be a College of Professional Psychology. It shall be governed by a Board of Governors. It shall have the authority to certify psychologists in recognized proficiency areas of practice and in other professional practice domains. Psychologists seeking such certification shall be health service providers in psychology who are licensed in a state or Canadian province. The College shall: (a) specify from among recognized practice proficiencies and from among professional practice domains those for which certificates ought to be made available to providers; such specification will be based on an assessment of need and feasibility that will include an opportunity for the submission of written public comment: designation of all such proficiencies and domains shall be subject to ratification by the Council of Representatives, (b) develop procedures for identifying candidates applying for certification who shall be qualified to sit for examination, (c) develop and refine examinations for evaluating candidates' knowledge and skills, (d) review and select training and continuing education offerings and sequences delivered by APA-approved continuing education vendors that conform to College proficiency education and training criteria, and (e) adopt standards for renewal of certificates.


The College shall consist of 12 members, each of whom shall serve a staggered term of 3 years. CAPP, BPA, BSA, BAPPI, BEA, and the practice divisions, as defined in Association Rule 90-4.2, shall each be represented by two seats on the College Board. One-third of the member shall retire each year. College members shall be limited to two successive full terms of service and may not further succeed themselves without a break in such service.


All members of the Board of Governors shall be APA members and at least 11 of the 12 members shall be licensed psychologists. The non-licensed member may be elected only to a seat representing BSA. The members shall be chosen by the APA Council of Representatives through a nomination process solicited from APA membership in the manner described in Association Rule 110-14.1. The names identified as a result of this solicitation shall be supplied to CAPP, BPA, BSA, BAPPI, BEA, and the practice divisions. CAPP, BPA, BSA, BAPPI, and BEA shall each forward to the College Board of Governors not more than nine, nor less than five names for a vacancy in an appropriately representative seat. The practice divisions may each forward to the College not more than two names for a vacancy in a seat assigned to them.


From the names provided by CAPP, BPA, BSA, BAPPI, BEA and the practice divisions, the College Board of Governors shall prepare ranked slates of five names for each vacancy and shall transmit the proposed slates to the Board of Directors. The Board of Directors shall develop three-person slates for each vacancy. The three-person slates must be taken from the ranked, five-person slates submitted to the Board of Directors by the College Board of Governors. The Board of Directors' slates will be developed in a manner to ensure gender and ethnic diversity of membership and will be submitted to the Council for election in the usual fashion. The College shall report to the Council of Representatives through the Board of Directors.


The College functions will be established administratively within the Central Office, subject to legal consultation to establish policy and procedures that will create appropriate autonomy of the College. The College shall establish rules that govern its procedures, subject to the approval of the Board of Directors acting for Council.]

B(5B). In executive session, Council voted to approve the name "American Psychological Association Practice Organization" as the name of the 501(c)(6) organization.

C.(19) Council voted to approve amending Association Rule 70-1.1. as follows (underlined material to be added):

70-1.1 The Policy and Planning Board shall consist of not fewer than nine Members of the Association. One of its members shall be a representative to Council serving in their first or second term on Council.

D.(48) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "Membership on Standing Boards and Committees and on Continuing Committees."

E.(49) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "P&P/Blue Ribbon Panel (Panel) Governance Renaissance Plan: Board and Committee Structure."

F.(50) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "P&P/Panel Governance Renaissance Plan: Redesign of the Council of Representatives."

G.(51) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "P&P/Panel Governance Renaissance Plan: Using Division Expertise."

H.(52) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "P&P/Panel Governance Renaissance Plan: Board of Directors."

I.(53) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "P&P/Panel Governance Renaissance Plan: Policy and Planning Board."

J.(54) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "P&P/Panel Governance Renaissance Plan: Committee on International Relations in Psychology."

K.(55) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "P&P/Panel Governance Renaissance Plan: National College of Professional Psychology."

J.(56) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "P&P/Panel Governance Renaissance Plan: Commission for the Recognition of Specialties and Proficiencies in Professional Psychology."

K.(57) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "P&P/Panel Governance Renaissance Plan: Committee on Division/APA Relations."

L.(58) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "P&P/Panel Governance Renaissance Plan: Ad Hoc Committee on Legal Issues."

M.(59) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "P&P/Panel Governance Renaissance Plan: Assessing Association Priorities."

N.(60) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "P&P/Panel Recommendation on Review of the Structure and Function of the American Psychological Association's Operational Units."

O.(61) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "P&P/Panel Recommendation for an APA Ombudsman."

P.(62) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "Change in Council's Name."

Q.(63) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "Council Seats for State Associations and Divisions."

R.(64) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "Policy on the Utilization of Technology."

VII. PUBLICATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS

A.(6) Council voted to adopt the following APA policy statement on freedom of scientific inquiry and presentation of research results:


The American Psychological Association is committed to fostering a vigorous science of psychology through the open exchange of ideas and data. A productive and healthy science requires freedom of inquiry and freedom of expression. Researchers must be free to pursue their scientific investigations within the constraints of the ethical principles, scientific principles, and guidelines of the discipline. Editors, too, after seeking appropriate peer review, must be free to publish that science in their journals even when findings are surprising, disappointing, or controversial.


The publication of a scientific article by a journal of the American Psychological Association does not constitute its endorsement. The Association will not condone any attempt to censor the reporting or discussion of science within its journals so long as it has been conducted ethically and meets the scientific standards of the profession. Further, the Association will neither retract a published paper nor censure authors or editors for ethical scientific activities that yield potentially controversial findings. Scientific investigation is an evolving process: The ultimate evaluation of scientific results depends on a continuous exchange of ideas and reexamination of ideas and findings.

B.(20) Council voted to allocate $25,000 from its 2000 contingency funds to support the expansion of the number of weekly press releases publicizing psychological science published in APA journals.

C.(21) Council voted to support the recommendations of the Board of Scientific Affairs and the Publications & Communications Board to increase our efforts to attain greater publicity and visibility of research published in APA journals. The Council further voted to approve the annual funding of such efforts ($100,000 for 2001) through the Office of Publications and Communications. The funding will be provided by the Office of Publications and Communications and the management of this press release effort will be provided by the Public Affairs Office.

VIII. CONVENTION AFFAIRS

No items.

IX. EDUCATIONAL AFFAIRS

A.(7) Council voted to formally confirm the recognition of Behavioral Psychology as a specialty in professional psychology.

B.(7A) Jack Plummer, PhD, Chair of the Commission for the Recognition of Specialties and Proficiencies and Professional Psychology (CRSPPP), informed Council of CRSPPP's plans to conduct a self-study of its experience with criteria and procedures for specialty recognition, leading ultimately to such recommendations on criterion and procedure revisions as may be warranted for Council's action.

C.(32C) The new business item "Education and Training Standards" was referred to the Board of Educational Affairs, the Board of Professional Affairs, the Committee for the Advancement of Professional Practice and COLI.

D.(35) Council received information regarding APA's participation in a new initiative entitled Shaping the Preparation of Future Social Science and Humanities Faculty: A Future Faculty Program.

E.(65) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "Bar to Service in the Accreditation Process."

F.(66) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "Membership on Accreditation Site Visiting Panels."

G.(67) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "Future Composition of the Committee on Accreditation."

H.(68) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "Internal Review of Committee on Accreditation Effectiveness."

I.(69) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "Greater Autonomy for Committee on Accreditation."

X. PROFESSIONAL AFFAIRS

A.(8) Council voted to approve the Criteria for Evaluating Treatment Guidelines which replaces the Template for Developing Guidelines: Interventions for Mental Disorders and Psychosocial Aspects of Physical Disorders.

B.(9) Norine G. Johnson, PhD, Ronald F. Levant, EdD, and Ruth Ullmann Paige, PhD, provided Council with an update on the Commission on Education and Training Leading to Licensure in Psychology.

C.(9A) Council voted to endorse the Practice Parameter: Screening and Diagnosis of Autism.

D.(9B) Council voted to approve the withdrawal of new business item 30H, "A Taxonomy for Professional Psychology."

E.(22) Council voted to reject a motion requesting that APA establish a database to enable patients to access their psychological records from their deceased psychologists' estates.

F.(23) Council voted to refer to the Board of Directors the item "Proposed Amendment to Association Rule 130-3 to Add the APA Award for Distinguished Contributions to Mental Health Services."

G.(24) Council voted to approve the continuation of funding for the Public Education Campaign at the current level of $1,000,000 per year as a regular line in the Association's budget with the proviso that the ongoing program assessment be continued and reported to the Finance Committee and Council every three years beginning in 2003.

H.(36) Council was informed of the Board's approval of a motion stating that it is the sense of the Board that existing policy on licensure supports APA's non-involvement in state licensure issues pertaining to other professions so long as the title of practice of psychology is not involved.

I.(36A) Council received an update on the Report of the Task Force on Envisioning, Identifying and Accessing New Professional Roles.

J.(36B) Council received an update on the College's Development of Psychopharmacology Examination: Examination Offered to Qualified Psychologists.

K.(70) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "A Taxonomy for Professional Psychology."

L.(71) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "Coalition Building to Design and to Implement Health Care Reform."

M.(72) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "Information Service for Practitioners."

N.(73) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "Task Force on Implementation of Primary Health Care Policy."

O.(74) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "Coordination of Trauma Activity Within APA."

XI. SCIENTIFIC AFFAIRS

A.(10) Council voted to approve amending Association Rule 140-5.1 as follows (bracketed material to be deleted; underlined material to be added):


140-5 Committee on Psychological Tests and Assessment

 

140.5-1 There shall be a Committee on Psychological Tests and Assessment whose responsibility it shall be to: (a) [consider] address problems regarding sound psychological testing and assessment practices, and initiate discussions with specific agencies and institutions outside APA concerning sound testing and assessment practices; (b) review regularly the [Joint Technical] Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing and recommend revision, when necessary; (c) serve as technical advisors to other APA boards and committees on all issues affecting testing and assessment as it involves policy, practice, and science; (d) monitor actions of government and other organizations concerning regulation and control of assessment and testing practices and make appropriate recommendations; [and], (e) maintain a knowledge of and concern regarding current policy issues on the use of tests and assessment in clinical, counseling, educational, and employment settings, and (f) promote the appropriate use of tests and sound assessment practices. Insofar as possible, the Committee shall have expertise in the theory, evaluation, and use of tests in clinical, counseling, school, and industrial/organizational psychology and shall represent the concerns of diverse groups that may be affected by testing. This may include but not be limited to persons with disabilities, women, and ethnic minorities. [women and ethnic minority groups]. In order for the Committee to maintain liaison and cooperation with other groups concerned with tests and assessment, it is desirable for some members of the Committee to hold joint membership in APA, the American Educational Research Association, and the National Council on Measurement in Education. The Committee shall consist of nine members appointed by the Board of Scientific Affairs in consultation with the Committee. Three members shall be appointed annually for a term of three years. Members shall be selected by the following process:

In a three year rotation, BPA, BEA, and BAPPI shall submit slates of at least three persons who reflect the orientation of their respective boards and who have expertise in some area of testing and assessment. One person shall be appointed from each slate of three nominees and thus three of the nine committee members shall be appointed in this way.

BSA shall select annually a member from a slate of three persons with expertise in the scientific aspects of testing.

A member shall be appointed annually from a slate of three candidates who combine a technical knowledge of testing with the respective orientations of BPA, BEA, or BAPPI (in a three-year rotation). Each slate shall be reviewed by the board whose views are to be represented.

BSA will be responsible for ensuring that at least two of the nine Committee members shall be ethnic minorities with expertise in one or more content areas of relevance to testing and assessment.

B.(11) Council voted to approve the Report of the Task Force on Test User Qualifications.

C.(25) Council voted to approve adding $150,000 to the 2001 Preliminary Budget to fund start-up costs of the Academic Enhancement Initiative activities, and adding $350,000 per year, beginning in 2002, as a regular line in the Association's budget for full funding of the Academic Enhancement Initiative, with the proviso that an ongoing program assessment be conducted and reported to the Finance Committee and Council every three years beginning in 2003.

D.(75) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "Ethical Principles in the Conduct of Research with Human Participants."

XII. PUBLIC INTEREST

A.(12) Council voted to approve the Resolution on Poverty and Socioeconomic Status as follows:

WHEREAS the income gap between the poor and the rich has continued to increase, with the average income of the poorest fifth of the population down 6% and the average income of the top fifth up 30% over the past 20 years (Bernstein, McNichol, Mishel, & Zahradnik, 2000);

WHEREAS the poverty rate in the United States is higher now than in nearly all years of the 1970s, child poverty (at 18.9% in 1998, representing 13.5 million children) continues to be higher here than in most other industrialized nations, and the proportion of the population living below the poverty line in 1998 was 12.7% (representing 34.5 million people) (Center for Budget and Policy Priorities, 1999; U.S. Census Bureau, 1999);

WHEREAS although Whites represented the largest single group among the poor in 1998, ethnic groups were overrepresented, with 26.1% of African Americans, 25.6% of Hispanics, 12.5% of Asians and Pacific Islanders, and 31% of American Indians on reservations living in poverty (National Congress of American Indians, 2000; U.S. Census Bureau, 1999), compared with the 8.2% of Whites who were poor;

WHEREAS families* with a female head of household had a poverty rate of 29.9% in 1998 and comprised the majority of poor families (U.S. Census Bureau, 1999);

WHEREAS the Task Force on Women, Poverty, and Public Assistance of the APA Society of the Psychology of Women (Division 35) has documented from the social sciences research literature the root causes of poverty and its impact for poor women, children, and their families, and called for a more effective public policy founded on this research base (Division 35 Task Force on Women, Poverty, and Public Assistance, 1998);

WHEREAS poverty is detrimental to psychological well-being, with NIMH data indicating that low-income individuals are 2 to 5 times more likely to suffer from a diagnosable mental disorder than those of the highest SES group (Bourdon, Rae, Narrow, Manderschild, & Regier, 1994; Regier et al., 1993), and poverty poses a significant obstacle to getting help for these mental health problems (McGrath, Keita, Strickland, & Russo, 1990);

WHEREAS accumulating research evidence indicates that the greater the income gap between the poorest and the wealthiest in a society, the higher the death rates for infants and adults and the lower the life expectancy for all members of that society, regardless of SES (Kawachi & Kennedy, 1997);

WHEREAS the impact of poverty on young children is significant and long lasting, limiting chances of moving out of poverty (McLoyd, 1998), poverty is associated with substandard housing, homelessness, inadequate child care, unsafe neighborhoods, and underresourced schools (Fairchild, 1984; Lott & Bullock, in press), and poor children are at greater risk than higher income children for a range of problems, including detrimental affects on IQ, poor academic achievement, poor socioemotional functioning, developmental delays, behavioral problems, asthma, poor nutrition, low birth weight, and pneumonia (Geltman, Meyers, Greenberg, & Zuckerman, 1996; McLoyd, 1998; Parker, Greer, & Zuckerman, 1988);

WHEREAS environmental factors such as environmental contaminants (e.g., lead paint, etc.), crowding, substandard housing, lack of potable water, and so forth have detrimental effects on mental and physical development that perpetuate and contribute to poverty;

WHEREAS low socioeconomic status is associated in women with higher mortality rates and with osteoarthritis, hypertension, cervical cancer, coronary heart disease, AIDS/HIV infection, and other chronic health conditions (Adler & Coriell, 1997), and poor women are sicker and more likely to have disabilities than their nonpoor counterparts, limiting their employment options and straining their financial resources (Falik & Collins, 1996; Olson & Pavetti, 1997);

WHEREAS men living in poverty are at high risk of violence (Reiss & Roth, 1993) and women living in poverty are at high risk of all types of violence, including sexual abuse as children, with researchers documenting reports by two thirds of poor mothers of severe violence at the hands of a childhood caretaker and by 42% of child sexual molestation (Browne & Bassuk, 1997), as well as severe and life threatening assaults as adults (Bassuk, Browne, & Buckner, 1996; Brooks & Buckner, 1996; Colten & Allard, 1997; Roper & Weeks, 1993), which presents obstacles to work and self-sufficiency (NOW Legal Defense and Education Fund, 1997; Raphael, 1996);

WHEREAS lack of affordable health insurance, including mental health and substance abuse coverage, impedes health and well-being, and poor women are over 3 times as likely as higher income women to be uninsured: 36% versus 11%, respectively (National Center for Health Statistics, 1995);

WHEREAS children of teenage pregnancy and single motherhood are at high risk for a life of poverty, and birth control is not covered by health insurance plans for a significant number of women;

WHEREAS older adults often live on limited retirement incomes, have limited prospects for future earnings, and frequently face overwhelming health care costs; 13% of older women and 20% of older persons living alone or with nonrelatives in 1998 lived on incomes below the poverty level; and 49% of older African American women living alone lived in poverty in 1998 (U.S. Census Bureau, 1999, cited in U.S. Administration on Aging, 1999);

WHEREAS lower socioeconomic status among older adults is associated with higher rates of medical and psychological disorders, poor older adults have poorer access to medical care, prescription medications, long-term care, and community-based care (Estes, 1995), and Medicare funds mental health care at a lower rate than medical care, and this further limits the access for older adults in poverty to mental health and substance abuse services;

WHEREAS migrant families are by the nature of their work and life circumstances poorly served by health and mental health professionals (Portes & Rumbaut, 1996; Wilk, 1986);

WHEREAS undocumented immigrants are vulnerable to legal actions that inhibit their access to health and mental health services, compounding issues of poverty and limited English language proficiency (Olivera, Effland, & Hamm, 1993);

WHEREAS research focused on low-income groups including immigrants, ethnic minorities, minimum wage workers, families receiving public assistance, the homeless, migrant workers, and older women is limited;

WHEREAS low-income groups are the targets of discrimination based on their socioeconomic status as well as other social indicators such as race/ethnicity and gender (Lott, in press);

WHEREAS perceptions of the poor and of welfare – by those not in those circumstances -- tend to reflect attitudes and stereotypes that attribute poverty to personal failings rather than socioeconomic structures and systems and that ignore strengths and competencies in these groups (Ehrenreich, 1987; Katz, 1989; Quadagno, 1994), and public policy and anti-poverty programs continue to reflect these stereotypes (Bullock, 1995; Furnham, 1993; Furnham & Gunter, 1984; Rubin & Peplau, 1975);

WHEREAS programs that ensure that poor individuals and families have basic needs met are important in addressing the impact of poverty;

WHEREAS ethnic strife and war disrupt the economic, public health, and social systems comprising the safety net that helps ensure basic needs are met;

WHEREAS psychologists as researchers, service providers, educators, and policy advocates have a responsibility to better understand the causes of poverty and its impact on health and mental health, to help prevent and reduce the prevalence of poverty and to effectively treat and address the needs of low-income individuals and families by building on the strengths of communities;

WHEREAS psychologists are ethically guided to "respect the fundamental rights, dignity, and worth of all people" (American Psychological Association, Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct, 1992);

WHEREAS "psychologists are aware of their professional and scientific responsibilities to the community and the society in which they work and live" (American Psychological Association, Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct, 1992);

 

THEREFORE Be it resolved that the American Psychological Association:

  1. Will advocate for more research that examines the causes and impact of poverty, economic disparity, and related issues such as socioeconomic status, classism, ageism, unintended pregnancy, environmental factors, ethnic strife and war, stereotypes, the stigma and feelings of shame associated with poverty, and mental and physical health problems, including depression, substance abuse, intimate violence, child sexual abuse, and elder abuse, as well as advocate for the broader dissemination of these research findings.

  2. Will advocate for more research on prejudicial and negative attitudes toward the poor by other persons who may individually or collectively perpetuate policies that tolerate poverty and social inequality.

  3. Will advocate for more research on special populations who are poor (women and children, immigrants, undocumented immigrants, migrants, ethnic minorities, older people, people with disabilities and other chronic health conditions such as AIDS/HIV infection, and rural and urban populations).

  4. Will advocate for research that identifies and learns from indigenous efforts by low-income people to work together to solve personal and shared problems or create organizations that advocate effectively for social justice.

  5. Will recommend that where possible and appropriate socioeconomic status be identified for published reports of social sciences research.

  6. Will advocate for incorporating evaluation and assessment tools and for encouraging integrative approaches such as the building of public and private community partnerships in programs addressing the issue of poverty and the poor, which psychological research has identified as effective strategies for addressing community level issues and problems.

  7. Will encourage in psychological graduate and postgraduate education and training curricula more attention to the causes and impact of poverty, to the psychological needs of poor individuals and families, and to the importance of developing "cultural competence" and sensitivity to diversity around issues of poverty in order to be able to help prevent and reduce the prevalence of poverty and to treat and address the needs of low-income clients.

  8. Will support public policy that encourages access for all children to high-quality early childhood education and a high-quality public school education, better equipping individuals for self-sufficiency.

  9. Will support public policy that ensures access to postsecondary education and training that allows working families to earn a self-sufficient wage to meet their family's needs.

  10. Will support public policy and programs that ensure adequate income, access to sufficient food and nutrition, and affordable and safe housing for poor people and all working families.

  11. Will support public policy that ensures access to family-friendly jobs offering good quality health insurance, including coverage for comprehensive family planning, mental health and substance abuse services, flexible work schedules, and sufficient family and medical leave.

  12. Will support public policy that ensures access to comprehensive family planning in private and public health insurance coverage.

  13. Will support public policy that ensures parity with medical coverage for mental health and substance abuse services under Medicare and Medicaid and ensures for all individuals, regardless of ability to pay, access to health care and mental health and substance abuse treatment that is comprehensive and culturally sensitive, that accommodates the needs of the children of parents seeking treatment, and that addresses the special needs of older adults in poverty, including prescriptions and long-term care.

  14. Will support public policy that encourages access for all children to high-quality early health care.

  15. Will support public policy that ensures for all working families access to affordable, high-quality child care, which is available year round, for the full day, and for all work shifts, as well as before- and after-school care.

  16. Will support public policy that provides early intervention and prevention for vulnerable children and families that enhance parenting, education, and community life so that children can develop the necessary competencies to move out of poverty.

  17. Will support public policy that provides early interventions and prevention for vulnerable children and families that are strengths-based, community-based, flexible, sensitive to culture and ethnic values of the family, and that have a long-lasting impact.

*The word family should be understood to incorporate the functions of family members rather than their biological sex or sexual orientation, for example, lesbian heads of household.

References

Adler, N. E., & Coriell, M. (1997). Socioeconomic status and women's health. In S. J. Gallant, G. P. Keita, & R. Royak-Schaler (Eds.), Health care for women: Psychological, social, and behavioral influences. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

American Psychological Association. (1992). Ethical principles of psychologists and code of conduct. (1992). American Psychologist, 47, 1597-1611.

Bassuk, E. L., Browne, A., & Buckner, J. C. (1996, August 28). The characteristics and needs of sheltered homeless and low-income housed mothers. Journal of the American Medical Association, 276, 640-646.

Bernstein, J., McNichol, E. C., Mishel, L., Zahradnik, R. (2000, January). Pulling apart: A state-by-state analysis of income trends. Washington, DC: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities/Economic Policy Institute.

Bourdon, K. H., Rae, D. S., Narrow, W. E., Manderschild, R. W., & Regier, D. A. (1994). National prevalence and treatment of mental and addictive disorders. In R. W. Mandershild & A. Sonnenschein (Eds.), Mental health: United States. Washington, DC: Center for Mental Health Services.

Brooks, M. G., & Buckner, J. C. (1996). Work and welfare: Job histories, barriers to employment, and predictors of work among low-income single mothers. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 66, 526-537.

Browne, A., & Bassuk, S.S. (1997). Intimate violence in the lives of homeless and poor house women: Prevalence and patterns in an ethnically diverse sample. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 67(2), 261-278.

Bullock, H. E. (1995). Class acts: Middle-class responses to the poor. In B. Lott & D. Maluso (Eds.), The social psychology of interpersonal discrimination (pp. 118-159). New York: Guilford.

Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. (1999). Low unemployment, rising wages fuel poverty decline. Washington, DC: Author.

Colten, M. E., & Allard, M. A. (1997). In harm's way? Domestic violence, AFDC receipt and welfare reform in Massachusetts. Boston: University of Massachusetts Center for Social Policy Research.

Division 35 Task Force on Women, Poverty, and Public Assistance, APA Division of the Psychology of Women. (1998). Making welfare to work really work. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. (Available from http://www.apa.org/pi/wpo/welftowork.html )

Ehrenreich, B. (1987). The new right attack on welfare. In F. Block, R. A. Cloward, B. Ehrenreich, & F. F. Piven, The mean season: The attack on the welfare state (pp. 161-195). New York: Pantheon Books.

Estes, C. (1995). Mental health issues for the elderly: Key policy elements. In M. Gatz (Ed.), Emerging issues in mental health and aging (pp. 303-327). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Fairchild, H. (1984). School size, per-pupil expenditures, and academic achievement. Review of Public Data Use, 12, 221-229.

Falik, M. M., & Collins, K S. (1996). Women's health: The Commonwealth Fund Survey. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press.

Furnham, A. (1993). Just world beliefs in twelve societies. Journal of Social Psychology, 133(3), 317-329.

Furnham, A., & Gunter, B. (1984). Just world beliefs and attitudes towards the poor. British Journal of Social Psychology, 23, 265-269.

Geltman, P. L., Meyers, A. F., Greenberg, J., & Zuckerman, B. (1996, Spring). Commentary: Welfare reform and children's health. Washington, DC: Center for Health Policy Research.

Katz, M. B. (1989). The undeserving poor: From the war on poverty to the war on welfare. New York: Pantheon Books.

Kawachi, I., & Kennedy, B. P. (1997, April 5). Socioeconomic determinants of health: Health and social cohesion: Why care about income inequality? British Medical Journal, 314, 1037.

Lott, B. (in press). Low income parents and the public schools. Journal of Social Issues.

Lott, B., & Bullock, H. E. (in press). Who are the poor? Journal of Social Issues.

McGrath, E., Keita, G. P., Strickland, B. R., & Russo, N. F. (1990). Women and depression: Risk factors and treatment issues. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

McLoyd, V. C. (1998). Socioeconomic disadvantage and child development. American Psychologist, 53, 185-204.

National Center for Health Statistics. (1995). Health: United States. Hyattsville, MD: U.S. Public Health Service.

National Congress of American Indians. (2000). Economic development. Washington, DC: Author.

NOW Legal Defense and Education Fund (1997, March). Report from the front lines: The impact of violence on poor women. New York: Author.

Olivera, V., Effland, J. R., & Hamm, S. (1993). Hired farm labor use on fruit, vegetable, and horticultural specialty farms. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education.

Olson, K., & Pavetti, L. (1997). Personal and family challenges to the successful transition from welfare to work. Washington, DC: The Urban Institute.

Parker, S., Greer, S., & Zuckerman, B. (1988). Double jeopardy: The impact of poverty on early childhood development. Pediatric Clinician, North America, 35, 1227-1240.

Portes, A., & Rumbaut, R. G. (1996). Immigrant America: A portrait (2nd ed.). Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

Quadagno, J. (1994). The color of welfare: How racism undermined the war on poverty. New York: Oxford University Press.

Raphael, J. (1996). Prisoners of abuse: Policy implications of the relationship between domestic violence and welfare receipt. Clearinghouse Review, 30, 186-194.

Regier, D. A., Farmer, M. E., Rae, D. S., Myers, J. K., Kramer, M., Robins, L. N., George, L. K., Karno, M., & Locke, B. Z. (1993). One-month prevalence of mental disorders in the United States and sociodemographic characteristics: The epidemiologic catchment area study. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 88, 35-47.

Reiss, A. J., Jr., & Roth, J. A. (Eds.). (1993). Understanding and preventing violence. Washington, DC: National Research Council.

Roper, P., & Weeks, G. (1993). Over half of the women on public assistance in Washington reported physical and sexual abuse as adults. Seattle: Washington State Institute for Public Policy.

Rubin, Z., & Peplau, L. (1975). Who believes in a just world? Journal of Social Issues, 31(3), 65-89.

U.S. Administration on Aging. (1999). Profile of older Americans: 1999. Washington, DC: Author.

U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Department of Commerce. (1999, September). Poverty in the United States: Current population reports: Consumer income. Washington, DC: Author.

Wilk, V. A. (1986). The occupational health of migrant and seasonal farm workers in the United States (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: Farm

B.(13) Council received with thanks the Report from the Working Group on Assisted Suicide and End-of-Life Decisions.

C.(13A) Council voted to approve the withdrawal of new business item 23F, "Need for Coordination of Trauma Activity within APA."

D.(26) Council voted to allocate $12,400 from its 2000 contingency funds to support two, three-day meetings of the Task Force on Advertising and Children composed of psychologists with expertise in issues including, but not limited to, child development, social influence and media and technology.

E.(27) Council voted to approve the inclusion of $26,000 in the 2001 Preliminary Budget for the establishment of a cross-constituency 5-person Ad Hoc Committee on End-of-Life Issues directed to provide oversight and leadership in implementing the recommendations of the Working Group on Assisted Suicide and End-of-Life Decisions, and as part of its charge, to explore and apply for external funding to continue implementation of the recommendations of the Working Group.

F.(76) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "Identification, Training and Organizational Responses to Workplace Violence."

G.(77) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "Proposed Resolution on Creating an APA Council Task Force on Pro Bono Affairs."

H.(78) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "Physician Assisted Suicide."

I.(79) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "Convention Projects in Site Cities."

J.(80) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "Implementation of Council Public Interest and Social Policy Resolutions."

K.(81) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "Need for Coordination of Trauma Activity within APA."

XIII. ETHNIC MINORITY AFFAIRS

A.(32F) The new business item "Resolution on Racial Profiling and Other Law Enforcement Activities" was referred to the Committee on Ethnic Minority Affairs, BAPPI, COLI and the Committee on Urban Initiatives.

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS

No items.

XV. CENTRAL OFFICE

No items.

XVI. FINANCIAL AFFAIRS

A.(14) Council voted to reject a motion requesting that respective boards within each directorate review all items requesting contingency funds from the Board or Council, or having fiscal implications from within the directorate and provide an overall prioritization and rank-ordering of such requests from the directorate to the Board or Council.

B.(15) Council voted to approve the following changes to the Association Rules (bracketed material to be deleted; underlined material to be added):


210-1.1 Finance Committee

The Finance Committee shall be composed of seven voting members[, of whom two shall be elected each year for terms of three years] and up to three non-voting members. Of the voting members, two shall be elected each year for terms of three years; [to be elected each year,] one slate shall be limited to first-year and/or second-year members of Council and the second slate shall be limited to first-year and/or second year Council members or former or outgoing members of the Finance Committee. No member may serve more than two consecutive terms. The seventh voting member of the Committee is the APA Treasurer, who shall serve as its Chair. The non-voting members shall be representatives from the investment community and are not necessarily psychologists. The non-voting members will be recommended by the Finance Committee and appointed by the Board of Directors for terms of three years not to exceed three consecutive terms.

Consistent with the mission of the Finance Committee set forth in Article XI, Section 3 of the APA Bylaws, the Finance Committee shall review and make recommendations on all new business and any old business coming before Council having financial implications that have not already been provided for in the budget. In addition, it is the responsibility of the Committee to (a) recommend overall investment strategy, including, but not limited to, amounts to be invested in equities, bonds, short-term holdings and real estate; (b) monitor the performance of the investment managers, if any; (c) research and develop alternative investments; (d) and advise the Treasurer and appropriate staff on investing funds not entrusted to an investment manager.

[ 90-4. There shall be an Investment Committee to be appointed by and report to the Board of Directors. The Investment Committee shall consist of six members, at least four of whom are APA members: One of the four shall be the APA Treasurer, who shall serve as chair; one shall be selected from a slate nominated by the Board for the Advancement of Psychology in the Public Interest (BAPPI); and the remaining two shall be current members of the Finance Committee. The other two members are to be representatives of the investment community and are not necessarily psychologists.

It is the responsibility of the Committee to (a) recommend overall investment strategy, including, but not limited to, amounts to be invested in equities, bonds, short-term holdings and real estate; (b) monitor the performance of the investment managers, if any; (c) research and develop alternative investments; (d) and advise the Treasurer and appropriate staff on investing funds not entrusted to an investment manager.

Terms of office shall be as follow: BAPPI representative, a maximum of two three-year terms; the APA Treasurer, consistent with the APA Treasurer's term of office; Finance Committee members, consistent with term on Finance Committee; members from the investment community, maximum of three three-year terms .]

Other related housekeeping changes:

50-5.1.1 List of Continuing Committees


[Investment Committee]

110-14.1 Members shall not serve simultaneously on any of the following governance
groups except as ex-officio (non-voting) members or if other exceptions are provided
below.


Finance [except that two members are also members of the Investment Committee]

[Investment Committee (except that two members are also members of the Finance Committee)]

C.(15A) Council voted to approve the withdrawal of new business item 30E, "Accountability."

D.(28) Council voted to postpone the item "Dues Equity" to its February 2001 meeting.

E.(29) Council voted to approve 1) instituting the practice of increasing the APA dues annually by an amount linked to the consumer price index for all urban consumers (CPI-U); and 2) a $4 dues increase from $215 to $219 for the 2001 dues year.

F.(30) Council voted to approve the 2001 Preliminary Budget with a deficit of $198,400, in principle, including the reclassification of the $1,000,000 partnership cash flow (historically referred to as the building subsidy). The 2001 Preliminary Budget shall serve as the framework for the 2001 Final Budget that will be presented to Council for approval in February 2001.

G.(31) Council voted to approve the following Net Worth Allocation Plan:

Net Worth Allocation Plan

  • The goal for attainment of net worth as stated in Association Rule 210-3 should be reaffirmed;
    namely, that the Association strives to maintain a net worth equal to at least one year's operating
    budget subject to the consideration of pressing priorities that may arise.

  • Consistent with accounting practices, conventional wisdom and comparable financial data from other organizations, the Association should not consider any portion of theoretical building equity toward attainment of the net worth goal mentioned in item 1 above. [Note: This action is recommended since consideration of building equity in the attainment of our net worth goal makes no additional funds available for operations.]

  • Currently, rather than specifically set aside funds outside the normal budget process for development of programs deemed to be of high priority to the membership, the Association enthusiastically supports consideration of proposals for new revenue generating ideas. [Such proposals for new revenue generating ideas should be thoroughly detailed including all direct costs, indirect costs, and staff costs. Such proposals reviewed by the Board of Directors and approved by the Council of Representatives, will be funded out of ongoing revenues or out of the Association's net worth, as necessary, assuming that full consideration is also given to the impact of such funding on progress towards the Association's net worth goal mentioned in item 1 above.]

  • The specific financial forecast for 2001 – 2003 is as follows:

  1. Strive to attain a net worth goal equal to at least one year's operating budget consistent with Association Rule 210-3;

  2. Include all net cash flow from building operations in the operating budget as a regular source of revenue (currently, the average net cash flow from building operations is estimated at $1,000,000 per year during this forecast period);

  3. Include funding in the operating budget for the Public Education Campaign through the forecast period (2001-2003);

  4. Restrict capital expenditures to no more than $4,500,000 over the forecast period;
    Continue to reinvest net gains/losses from our long-term portfolio activity (estimated at $2,700,000 over the forecast period);

  5. Continue to subsidize the operating budget by all interest and dividends generated from our long-term portfolio activity (estimated at $2,000,000 over the forecast period); and,

  6. Continue to treat the advance to Square 677 as a loan rather than as an additional capital contribution and limit the loan principal to no more than $10 million dollars.

  • Each year based on actual results and an analysis of our net worth, future financial forecasts will be adjusted accordingly.

  • Once the net worth goals are attained, any number of future actions can be taken including the long-term stabilization of dues; the long-term availability of funds for the development of programs deemed to be of high priority to the membership; further apportionment of building and investment proceeds toward operational expenses, etc.

H.(37) Council was informed of the decision to not purchase the warehouse at the increased sales price and of APA's receipt of reimbursement for the cost of the due diligence effort from the Trammell Crow Company.

I.(38) Council received as information the Arthur Andersen LLP 1999 Audited Financial Statements.

J.(39) Council received as information the June 2000 Finance Committee meeting minutes.

K.(82) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "Accountability."

L.(83) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "Sale of APA Buildings."

M.(84) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item "Priority Setting and Cost-Containment."


On Thursday morning, Cynthia D. Belar, PhD, Executive Director of the Education Directorate, provided a report to Council.

On Thursday afternoon, Ronald F. Levant, EdD, and the Caucus and Coalition Chairs led a Roundtable Discussion regarding the philosophy of the budget and related issues.

On Thursday afternoon, a memorial remembrance was held for Catherine Acuff, PhD.

On Sunday morning, Russ Newman, PhD, JD, Executive Director for the Practice Directorate, provided a report to Council on the Practice Directorate and the Public Education Campaign. Dr. Newman was also presented with a presidential citation.

On Sunday morning, Rosemary Schwartzbard received a presidential citation recognizing her and her colleagues for their work with the Disaster Response Network

On Sunday afternoon, Rachel T. Hare-Mustin, PhD, Parliamentarian, was presented with a presidential citation.