Council Of Representatives: August 13 & 17, 2008

Approved Minutes

I. MINUTES OF MEETING

A.(1) Council voted to approve the minutes of its February 22-24, 2008, meeting.

II. ELECTIONS, AWARDS, MEMBERSHIP AND HUMAN RESOURCES

A.(2) Council voted to elect 128 members to initial Fellows status, on the nomination of the indicated divisions and on the recommendation of the Fellows Committee and the Board of Directors.

B.(3) Council voted to approve the withdrawal of Council New Business Item #33D, “Enhancing Member Dues Revenue.”

C.(4) Council voted to approve the inclusion of $60,000 in the 2009 Preliminary Budget to fund the pilot test of the APA Accomplishment Reports for membership recruitment, retention and engagement. In addition, the Council of Representatives voted to approve continued funding for this effort and the addition of $60,000 per year to the 2010-2012 budgets.

D.(34C) A new business item “Membership in the American Psychological Association” was referred to the Membership Board, the Board of Scientific Affairs, the Publications and Communications Board and the Policy and Planning Board.

E.(43) Council received as information the item “Proposals for Changing the Dues Structure.” The item will be forwarded to boards and committees for review and feedback before being brought back to the Board at its December 2008 meeting and to Council at its February 2009 meeting for action. Council voted to request that Council New Business Item #33C, “APA Dues Credit for Members Who Are State, Provincial and Territorial Psychological Association Members” be placed on the February 2009 Council agenda for action. Council asked that the new business item be put on the agenda for a time certain at the February 2009 meeting and that the item not be considered as part of any other agenda item.

III. ETHICS

A.(34E) A new business item “Council Resolution Directing the Ethics Committee to Complete Action from the August 2005 Meeting in Time for Council to Review the Ethics Committee Recommendation At Its August 2009 meeting” was referred to the Ethics Committee and the Committee on Legal Issues (COLI).

IV. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

A.(5) Council voted to request that diversity training on aging be provided to Council at its February 2009 meeting and to boards and committees at the Spring or Fall 2009 Consolidated Meetings. The training shall be developed by the Office on Aging with assistance from the Governance Affairs Office.

Council also voted to request that one of the 2009 diversity training presentations be videotaped and provided to boards and committees that do not meet during the Consolidated Meetings.

B.(6) Council voted to allocate $4,000 from its 2008 discretionary fund to support a second meeting in 2008 of the 2009 Presidential Task Force on the Future of Psychology Practice.

C.(7) Council voted to approve the inclusion of $50,000 in the 2009 Preliminary Budget to support the 2009 Presidential Summit on the Future of Psychology Practice to be held May 14-17, 2009, in San Antonio, Texas. Council also voted to approve matching up to $25,000 of any additional funds raised from APA entities and affiliates.

V. DIVISIONS AND STATE AND PROVINCIAL AND TERRITORIAL ASSOCIATIONS

A.(8) Council voted to approve the inclusion of $20,000 in the 2009 Preliminary Budget to fund hotel accommodations for the primary representative of each division attending the Division Leadership Conference.

B.(35) Council received an update on the business pending item “Task Force to Address SPTA Impact on and Input in the Development of APA Policy (#32C).”

VI. ORGANIZATION OF THE APA

A.(9) Council voted to approve the following new mission statement for APA: “The mission of the APA is to advance the creation, communication and application of psychological knowledge to benefit society and improve people’s lives.” Council discussed a draft vision statement for APA and will consider this further at its February 2009 meeting.

B.(34B) A new business item “APA’s Tax Status” was referred to the Policy and Planning Board and the Finance Committee.

VII. UBLICATIONS AND DATABASES

A.(10) Council voted to approve the Division 14 request for authorization to publish a divisional journal, to be titled Industrial and Organizational Psychology: Perspectives on Science and Practice.

B.(11) Council voted to approve the Division 56 request for authorization to publish a divisional journal, tentatively entitled Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research and Practice.

C.(43A) Council received as information and discussed the item “ Overview of Open and Public Access.”

VIII. CONVENTION AFFAIRS

No items.

IX. EDUCATIONAL AFFAIRS

A.(12) Council voted to receive the final report on Teaching. Learning and Assessing in a Developmentally Coherent Curriculum, a report developed by the Board of Educational Affairs Task Force on Strengthening the Teaching and Learning of Undergraduate Psychological Science.

B.(13) Council voted to adopt as APA policy the revised Principles for the Recognition of Proficiencies in Professional Psychology. Further, Council asked that the Commission for the Recognition of Specialties and Proficiencies in Professional Psychology (CRSPPP) engage in further study of the role, purpose and function of proficiencies in the taxonomy of psychology, building on the work of the Board of Directors Taxonomy Task Force, providing updates as appropriate to the Board of Directors.     

C.(14) Council voted to approve the renewal of the recognition of the Psychological Treatment of Alcohol and other Psychoactive Substance Disorders as a proficiency in professional psychology for a period of seven years, to be reviewed again in 2015 unless otherwise warranted by provisions outlined in the CRSPPP Procedures for Recognition of Specialties and Proficiencies in Professional Psychology.

D.(15) Council voted to approve the recognition of Police Psychology as a proficiency in professional psychology for a period of seven years, to be reviewed again in 2015 unless otherwise warranted by provisions outlined in the CRSPPP Procedures for Recognition of Specialties and Proficiencies in Professional Psychology.

E.(16) Council voted to grant an extension of the recognition of Psychopharmacology as a proficiency in professional psychology for a period of one year until August 2009.

F.(17) Council voted to approve the renewal of the recognition of Forensic Psychology as a specialty in professional psychology for a period of seven years, to be reviewed again in 2015 unless otherwise warranted by provisions outlined in the CRSPPP Procedures for Recognition of Specialties and Proficiencies in Professional Psychology.

G.(18) Council voted to grant an extension of the recognition of Behavioral Psychology as a specialty in professional psychology for a period of one year until August 2009.

H.(44) Council received as information an update on the joint BEA/CAPP Task Force to Develop an APA Designation Process for Postdoctoral Psychopharmacology Education and Training Programs.

X. PROFESSIONAL AFFAIRS

A.(19) Council voted to adopt the Criteria for the Evaluation of Quality Improvement Programs and the Use of Quality Improvement Data as APA policy.

B.(19A) In executive session, Council voted to approve the inclusion of $64,400 in the 2008 Probable and $205,000 in the 2009 Preliminary Budget for the sustained contribution of psychology to the revision of the Mental Health chapter of the International Classification of Diseases and Related Disorders (ICD). This contribution will support the secondment through the International Union of Psychological Science (IUPsyS) of the services of a psychologist consultant expert to work full time as part of the core revision team in the World Health Organization (WHO) through the anticipated completion of the ICD revision in 2012. Council requested that the contract with IUPsyS be reviewed annually by the Board of Directors through the projected completion of the ICD revision in 2012, and be renewed each year if APA is satisfied with the outcomes of its ongoing support.

C.(34A) A new business item “Best Practice Guidelines on Prevention, Practice, Research, Training and Social Advocacy for Psychologists” was referred to the Board of Professional Affairs (BPA), the Board for the Advancement of Psychology in the Public Interest, the Board of Educational Affairs (BEA), BSA, the Committee for the Advancement of Professional Practice (CAPP), the Committee on International Relations in Psychology and COLI.

D.(34D) A new business item “Model Research on the Efficacy of the Prescribing Psychologist” was referred to CAPP, BEA, BPA, BSA and COLI.

E.(36) Council received an update on the business pending item “Infusing the Association Guidelines in the Public Interest Which Have Been Adopted by Council for Psychologists throughout APA.”

F.(37) Council received an update on the business pending item “Division 55 Pharmacotherapy Practice Guidelines.”

G.(38) Council received an update on the business pending item “Ad Hoc Task Force to Investigate the Merits, Needs and Outcomes of an Evidence Based Practice Policy for Applied Psychologists and the Benefits of Collaboration with International Associations Interested in Developing EBP Policy for Applied Psychology.”

H.(45) Council received as information an update on the revision process for APA’s Model Act for State Licensure of Psychologists.

XI. SCIENTIFIC AFFAIRS

A.(20) Council voted to approve the withdrawal of Council New Business Item #30, “Task Force on the Interface Between Psychology and Global Warming.”

B.(21) Council voted to receive the Report of the 2007 APA Presidential Task Force on Institutional Review Boards and Psychological Science as amended.

C.(22) Council voted to receive the Report of the Task Force on Recommending Changes to the APA Convention That Would Appeal to Scientists.

D.(23) Council voted to approve the following housekeeping Association Rule change (bracketed material to be deleted; underlined material to be added):

140-3. COMMITTEE ON SCIENTIFIC AWARDS

140-3.1 There shall be a Committee on Scientific Awards consisting of six members, two of whom shall be elected each year for terms of three years. The Committee shall announce the recipients of the awards at the annual convention, and it shall report other matters to Council through the Board of Scientific Affairs.

140-3.2 The APA may award annually up to four prizes of up to $2,000 each for outstanding contributions to the science of psychology. Three of these awards are to be known as the "APA Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions." The Committee shall select recipients for the awards who, in its opinion, have made distinguished theoretical or empirical contributions to basic research in psychology. The fourth award in the amount of up to $2,000 shall be known as the "APA Distinguished Scientific Award for the Applications of Psychology." The award is for distinguished theoretical or empirical advances leading to the understanding or amelioration of important practical problems. The Committee shall seek diversity in selecting recipients, avoiding so far as possible the selection of more than one person representing a specialized topic, a specific material, a given method, or a particular application.

There shall be an increase in the number of these senior scientific awards from four to seven per year for calendar years 1987, 1988, and 1989.

140-3.3 The APA may award five [three] annual prizes of up to $1,000 for important contributions to the science of psychology made by younger people early in their career. The award is known as the "APA Distinguished Scientific Awards for an Early Career Contribution to Psychology." It is expected that award will focus more on specific contributions rather than on continuing contributions.

140-3.4 Ineligible for the awards are members serving currently on the Committee, former recipients of the award in question, and the current APA President and President-elect.

140-3.5 Nominations for these awards shall be solicited in the broadest possible manner, including announcements in appropriate publications. Deadlines for receipt of nominations shall be established by the Committee each year. Additionally, the Committee shall systematically review promising nominations from previous years.

140-3.6 Award recipients are invited to the APA annual convention to receive the award and to address convention attendees in the year following the receipt of the award.

E.(24) Council voted to reject the following main motion:

That the Council of Representatives approve the addition of $35,000 to the 2009 Preliminary Budget and the following Association Rule changes to increase the monetary prizes for APA awards (bracketed material to be deleted; underlined material to be added):

120-2. COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION AND TRAINING AWARDS

120-2.1 There shall be a Committee on Education and Training Awards consisting of six members, two to be elected annually for terms of three years.

The committee shall announce the recipients of the awards at the annual convention, and it shall report other matters to Council through the Board of Educational Affairs.

120-2.2 The APA shall award annually (up to) two awards, one for $3,000 [$1,000] for short or long term Distinguished Contributions to Education and Training in psychology and a second award of up to $3,000 [$1,000] for Distinguished Contributions for Applications of Psychology in Education. The intent of the Distinguished Contributions to Education and Training Award is to recognize psychologists who make traditional contributions, who provide innovations, or who are involved in developmental phases of programs that influence education and training in psychology. The intent of the Distinguished Contribution for Applications of Psychology to Education and Training is to recognize psychologists who contribute to new teaching methods or the solution of learning problems through the use of research findings or evidence-based practices. Particular emphasis will be placed on the use of psychological knowledge to improve learning in educational settings, including pre-kindergarten to 12, or communities.

120-2.3 Ineligible for the awards are members serving currently on the committee, former recipients of the awards, and the current APA President and President-elect.

120-2.4 Nominations for these awards shall be solicited in the broadest possible manner, including through announcements in appropriate publications. The committee may also nominate candidates as well as specify which nominees will be carried over to the following year. Additionally, the Committee shall systematically review promising nominations from previous years. Deadlines for receipt of nominations shall be established by the committee each year.

120-2.5 Award recipients shall be invited to the annual convention to receive the awards and to address annual convention attendees in the year following the receipt of the award.

130-3. PROFESSIONAL AWARDS

130-3.1 The Board of Professional Affairs shall announce its professional awards in a timely fashion in advance of the annual convention.

130-3.2 The APA may award annually up to three prizes of up to $3,000 [$2,000] each for outstanding contributions to psychology as a profession. The Board of Professional Affairs shall select as recipients for the awards those who have made outstanding contributions to the knowledge base of professional psychology, in technical applications in the applied practice of psychological knowledge, or in the use of the knowledge base or the practice base in psychology for the betterment of the general public. These contributions should be seminal or innovative in ways that are judged to have improved or changed significantly the conceptual understanding of behavior or the applied practice of such conceptual understanding of behavior, or to have accrued significant benefit to the public.

1. The APA Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research. This award is given to a psychologist whose research has led to important discoveries or developments in the field of applied psychology. To be eligible, this research should have led to innovative applications in an area of psychological practice, including but not limited to assessment, consultation, instruction, or intervention (either direct or indirect). Research involving the original development of procedures, methodologies, or technical skills that significantly improve the application of psychological knowledge and provide direct and immediate solutions to practical problem areas will be considered, as will research that has informed psychologists on how better to observe, define, predict, or control behavior. Original integration of existing theories or knowledge is also eligible for consideration.

2. The APA Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Independent or Institutional Practice in the Private Sector. This award recognizes outstanding service delivery by a licensed psychologist who is primarily engaged in the practice of psychology in a private sector setting. The award is intended to recognize outstanding practitioners in psychology. Nominations will be considered for psychologists working in any area of clinical specialization, health services provision, or consulting, and services provided to any patient population or professional clientele in an independent or institutional practice setting. Services provided to diverse client groups or patient populations, including but not limited to children/adolescents/adults/older adults; urban/rural/frontier populations; minority populations; and persons with serious mental illness, will be considered. Contributions can be judged distinguished by virtue of peer recognition, advancement of the public's recognition of psychology as a profession, relevant professional association honors, or other meritorious accomplishments denoting excellence as a practitioner including advancement of the profession.

3. The APA Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Practice in the Public Sector. This award recognizes outstanding service delivery by a psychologist who is primarily engaged in the practice of psychology in a public sector setting (e.g., state hospital, military, veteran's administration, etc.). The award is intended to recognize outstanding practitioners in psychology. Nominations will be considered for psychologists working in a wide variety of public sector settings. Services provided to diverse client groups or patient populations, including but not limited to children/adolescents/adults/older adults; urban/rural/frontier populations; minority populations; and persons with serious mental illness, will be considered. Contributions can be judged distinguished by virtue of peer recognition, advancement of the public's recognition of psychology as a profession, relevant professional association honors, or other meritorious accomplishments denoting excellence as a practitioner including improvement of public service delivery systems or development of psychologically informed public policy.

130-3.3 The Board of Professional Affairs shall seek diversity in selecting recipients, avoiding as far as possible the consecutive selection of more than one person representing a specialized topic, a specific material, a given method, a particular application, or a specific specialized service.

130-3.4 Ineligible for the awards are members serving currently on the Board of Professional Affairs and the current APA President and President-elect. The following rules also apply: No person can receive a professional award in any two consecutive years; recipients are permitted to receive only one award in their lifetime per category of the professional awards; current members of the Board of Professional Affairs cannot vote for members of their own family; and those with a history of ethical violations at a state or national level or who have received disciplinary action from a state board of examiners in psychology are not eligible.

130-3.5 Nominations for these awards shall be solicited in the broadest possible manner, including announcements in appropriate publications. The category of the three awards in which the nomination is placed shall be based, insofar as possible, on a determination of the candidate's primary area of work. Deadlines for receipt of nominations shall be established by the Board of Professional Affairs each year. Nominators are responsible for providing the Board of Professional Affairs with an up-to-date resume and bibliography and a narrative statement detailing the nature of the contributions and focus of the nomination. Endorsements from other individuals and groups are also considered part of the record. All nominations are good for two years, after which nominators must reapply for another review. Nominators of the award recipients are also responsible for the wording of the awards' citation.

130-3.6 Award recipients shall be invited to be present at the annual convention to receive the awards and to address convention attendees in the year following the receipt of the awards.

140-3. COMMITTEE ON SCIENTIFIC AWARDS

140-3.1 There shall be a Committee on Scientific Awards consisting of six members, two of whom shall be elected each year for terms of three years. The Committee shall announce the recipients of the awards at the annual convention, and it shall report other matters to Council through the Board of Scientific Affairs.

140-3.2 The APA may award annually up to four prizes of up to $3,000 [$2,000] each for outstanding contributions to the science of psychology. Three of these awards are to be known as the "APA Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions." The Committee shall select recipients for the awards who, in its opinion, have made distinguished theoretical or empirical contributions to basic research in psychology. The fourth award in the amount of up to $3,000 [$2,000] shall be known as the "APA Distinguished Scientific Award for the Applications of Psychology." The award is for distinguished theoretical or empirical advances leading to the understanding or amelioration of important practical problems. The Committee shall seek diversity in selecting recipients, avoiding so far as possible the selection of more than one person representing a specialized topic, a specific material, a given method, or a particular application.

There shall be an increase in the number of these senior scientific awards from four to seven per year for calendar years 1987, 1988, and 1989.

140-3.3 The APA may award three annual prizes of up to $2,000 [$1,000] for important contributions to the science of psychology made by younger people early in their career. The award is known as the "APA Distinguished Scientific Awards for an Early Career Contribution to Psychology." It is expected that award will focus more on specific contributions rather than on continuing contributions.

140-3.4 Ineligible for the awards are members serving currently on the Committee, former recipients of the award in question, and the current APA President and President-elect.

140-3.5 Nominations for these awards shall be solicited in the broadest possible manner, including announcements in appropriate publications. Deadlines for receipt of nominations shall be established by the Committee each year. Additionally, the Committee shall systematically review promising nominations from previous years.

140-3.6 Award recipients are invited to the APA annual convention to receive the award and to address convention attendees in the year following the receipt of the award.

150-3. COMMITTEE ON PSYCHOLOGY IN THE PUBLIC INTEREST AWARDS

150-3.1 There shall be a Committee on Psychology in the Public Interest Awards consisting of the current Chair of the Board for the Advancement of Psychology in the Public Interest, the two past Chairs, and two psychologists appointed by Board for the Advancement of Psychology in the Public Interest who are members of the Association but not members of the Board for the Advancement of Psychology in the Public Interest and who will reflect the diversity of public interest constituencies. The Committee shall announce the recipients of the awards at the annual convention, and it shall report other matters to Council through the Board for the Advancement of Psychology in the Public Interest.

150-3.2 The APA may award annually up to three prizes of up to $3,000 [$2,000] each for outstanding contributions to psychology in the public interest and for outstanding contributions to research in public policy. Two of these awards are to be known as the "APA Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest." The Committee shall select recipients whose single extraordinary achievement or a lifetime of outstanding contributions have met one or more of the following criteria: (a) courageous and distinctive contribution in the science or profession of psychology that makes a material contribution to the solution of one of the world's intransigent social problems; (b) distinctive and innovative contribution that makes the science and/or profession of psychology more accessible in a positive manner to a greater number of persons; and (c) an integration of the science and/or profession of psychology with social action in a manner beneficial to all.

150-3.3 The third award in the amount of up to $3,000 [$2,000] shall be known as the "APA Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy." The award is for a distinguished empirical or theoretical contribution to research in public policy. This contribution may consist of: (a) sound research that leads others to view specific national policies differently; (b) research that provides evidence directly relevant to public policy alternatives; (c) research that demonstrates the importance of the application of psychological methods and theory to public policy; and (d) research that clarifies the ways in which scientific knowledge regarding human behavior informs public policy.

150-3.4 Ineligible for the awards are members serving on the Committee and on the Board for the Advancement of Psychology in the Public Interest, former recipients of the award, and the current APA President and President-elect.

150-3.5 Nominations for these awards shall be solicited in the broadest possible manner, including placement of announcements in appropriate publications. The Committee may also nominate candidates. Additionally, the Committee shall systematically review promising nominations from previous years. Deadlines for receipt of nominations shall be established by the Committee each year.

150-3.6 Award recipients shall be invited to the APA annual convention to receive the awards and to address convention attendees in the year following the receipt of the awards.

XII. PUBLIC INTEREST

A.(25) Council voted to approve the withdrawal of Council New Business Item #25I, “Proposed Task Force on the Psychological Effects of War on Children and Families.”

B.(26) Council voted to receive the Report of the Task Force on Mental Health and Abortion.

C.(27) Council voted to receive the Report of the Task Force on Resilience and Strength in Black Children and Adolescents.

D.(28) Council voted to receive the Report of the Task Force on Evidence-Based Practice with Children and Adolescents as amended.

E.(29) Council voted to receive the Report of the Task Force on Gender Identity and Gender Variance.

F.(30) Council voted to adopt the following Resolution on Transgender and Gender Identity and Gender Expression Non-Discrimination as APA policy:

Resolution on Transgender, Gender Identity, and
Gender Expression Non-Discrimination

WHEREAS transgender and gender variant people frequently experience prejudice and discrimination and psychologists can, through their professional actions, address these problems at both an individual and a societal level;

WHEREAS the American Psychological Association opposes prejudice and discrimination based on demographic characteristics including gender identity, as reflected in policies including the Hate Crimes Resolution (Paige, 2005), the Resolution on Prejudice Stereotypes and Discrimination (Paige, 2007), APA Bylaws (Article III, Section 2), the Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (APA 2002, 3.01 and Principle E);

WHEREAS transgender and other gender variant people benefit from treatment with therapists with specialized knowledge of their issues (Lurie, 2005; Rachlin, 2002), and that the Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct state that when A scientific or professional knowledge ...is essential for the effective implementation of their services or research, psychologists have or obtain the training....necessary to ensure the competence of their services...” (APA 2002, 2.01b);

WHEREAS discrimination and prejudice against people based on their actual or perceived gender identity or expression detrimentally affects psychological, physical, social, and economic well-being (Bockting et al., 2005; Coan et al., 2005; Clements-Nolle, 2006; Kenagy, 2005; Kenagy & Bostwick, 2005; Nemoto et al., 2005; Resolution on Prejudice Stereotypes and Discrimination, Paige, 2007; Riser et al., 2005; Rodriquez-Madera & Toro-Alfonso, 2005; Sperber et al., 2005; Xavier et al., 2005);

WHEREAS transgender people may be denied basic non-gender transition related health care (Bockting et al., 2005; Coan et al., 2005; Clements-Nolle, 2006; GLBT Health Access Project, 2000; Kenagy, 2005; Kenagy & Bostwick, 2005; Nemoto et al., 2005; Riser et al., 2005; Rodriquez-Madera & Toro-Alfonso, 2005; Sperber et al., 2005; Xavier et al., 2005);

WHEREAS gender variant and transgender people may be denied appropriate gender transition related medical and mental health care despite evidence that appropriately evaluated individuals benefit from gender transition treatments (De Cuypere et al., 2005; Kuiper & Cohen-Kettenis, 1988; Lundstrom, et al., 1984; Newfield, et al., 2006; Pfafflin & Junge, 1998; Rehman et al., 1999; Ross & Need, 1989; Smith et al., 2005);

WHEREAS gender variant and transgender people may be denied basic civil rights and protections (Minter, 2003; Spade, 2003) including: the right to civil marriage which confers a social status and important legal benefits, rights, and privileges (Paige, 2005); the right to obtain appropriate identity documents that are consistent with a post-transition identity; and the right to fair and safe and harassment-free institutional environments such as care facilities, treatment centers, shelters, housing, schools, prisons and juvenile justice programs;

WHEREAS transgender and gender variant people experience a disproportionate rate of homelessness (Kammerer et al., 2001), unemployment (APA, 2007) and job discrimination (Herbst et al., 2007), disproportionately report income below the poverty line (APA, 2007) and experience other financial disadvantages (Lev, 2004);

WHEREAS transgender and gender variant people may be at increased risk in institutional environments and facilities for harassment, physical and sexual assault (Edney, 2004; Minter, 2003; Peterson et al., 1996; Witten & Eyler, 2007) and inadequate medical care including denial of gender transition treatments such as hormone therapy (Edney, 2004; Peterson et al., 1996; Bockting et al., 2005; Coan et al., 2005; Clements-Nolle, 2006; Kenagy, 2005; Kenagy & Bostwick, 2005; Nemoto et al., 2005; Newfield et al., 2006; Riser et al., 2005; Rodriquez-Madera &Toro-Alfonso, 2005; Sperber et al., 2005; Xavier et al., 2005);

WHEREAS many gender variant and transgender children and youth face harassment and violence in school environments, foster care, residential treatment centers, homeless centers and juvenile justice programs (D'Augelli, Grossman, & Starks, 2006; Gay Lesbian and Straight Education Network, 2003; Grossman, D'Augelli, & Slater, 2006);

WHEREAS psychologists are in a position to influence policies and practices in institutional settings, particularly regarding the implementation of the Standards of Care published by the World Professional Association of Transgender Health (WPATH, formerly known as the Harry Benjamin International Gender Dysphoria Association) which recommend the continuation of gender transition treatments and especially hormone therapy during incarceration (Meyer et al., 2001);

WHEREAS psychological research has the potential to inform treatment, service provision, civil rights and approaches to promoting the well-being of transgender and gender variant people;

WHEREAS APA has a history of successful collaboration with other organizations to meet the needs of particular populations, and organizations outside of APA have useful resources for addressing the needs of transgender and gender variant people;

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT APA opposes all public and private discrimination on the basis of actual or perceived gender identity and expression and urges the repeal of discriminatory laws and policies;

THEREFORE BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT APA supports the passage of laws and policies protecting the rights, legal benefits, and privileges of people of all gender identities and expressions;

THEREFORE BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT APA supports full access to employment, housing, and education regardless of gender identity and expression;

THEREFORE BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT APA calls upon psychologists in their professional roles to provide appropriate, nondiscriminatory treatment to transgender and gender variant individuals and encourages psychologists to take a leadership role in working against discrimination towards transgender and gender variant individuals;

THEREFORE, BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT APA encourages legal and social recognition of transgender individuals consistent with their gender identity and expression, including access to identity documents consistent with their gender identity and expression which do not involuntarily disclose their status as transgender for transgender people who permanently socially transition to another gender role;

THEREFORE BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT APA supports access to civil marriage and all its attendant benefits, rights, privileges and responsibilities, regardless of gender identity or expression;

THEREFORE BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT APA supports efforts to provide fair and safe environments for gender variant and transgender people in institutional settings such as supportive living environments, long-term care facilities, nursing homes, treatment facilities, and shelters, as well as custodial settings such as prisons and jails;

THEREFORE BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT APA supports efforts to provide safe and secure educational environments, at all levels of education, as well as foster care environments and juvenile justice programs, that promote an understanding and acceptance of self and in which all youths, including youth of all gender identities and expressions, may be free from discrimination, harassment, violence, and abuse;

THEREFORE BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT APA supports the provision of adequate and medically necessary mental and medical health care treatment for transgender and gender variant individuals;

THEREFORE, BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT APA recognizes the efficacy, benefit and necessity of gender transition treatments for appropriately evaluated individuals and calls upon public and private insurers to cover these medically necessary treatments;

THEREFORE BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT APA supports access to appropriate treatment in institutional settings for people of all gender identities and expressions; including access to appropriate health care services including gender transition therapies;

THEREFORE BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT APA supports the creation of educational resources for all psychologists in working with individuals who are gender variant and transgender;

THEREFORE BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT APA supports the funding of basic and applied research concerning gender expression and gender identity;

THEREFORE BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT APA supports the creation of scientific and educational resources that inform public discussion about gender identity and gender expression to promote public policy development, and societal and familial attitudes and behaviors that affirm the dignity and rights of all individuals regardless of gender identity or gender expression;

THEREFORE BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT APA supports cooperation with other organizations in efforts to accomplish these ends.

References

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Bockting, W. O., Huang, C., Ding, H., Robinson, B., & Rosser, B. R. S.(2005). Are transgender persons at higher risk for HIV than other sexual minorities? A comparison of HIV prevalence and risks. International Journal of Transgenderism, 3(2/3), 123-131.

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Coan, D. L., Schranger, W., & Packer, T.(2005). The role of male sex partners in HIV infection among male-to-female transgendered individuals. International Journal of Transgenderism, 3(2/3), 21-30.

D'Augelli, A. R., Grossman, A. H., & Starks, M. T. (2006). Childhood gender atypicality, victimization, and PTSD among lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 21(11), 1462-1482.

De Cuypere G,TSjoen, G., Beerten, R., Selvaggi, G., De Sutter, P., Hoebeke, P., Monstrey, S., Vansteenwegen A., & Rubens, R. (2005). Sexual and physical health after sex reassignment surgery. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 34(6), 679-690.

Edney, R. (2004). To keep me safe from harm? Transgender prisoners and the experience of imprisonment. Deakin Law Review, 9(2), 327-338.

Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network. (2004). 2003 National School Climate Survey: The school related experiences of our nation’s lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender youth. New York: GLSEN.

GLBT Health Access Project. (2000). Access to healthcare for transgendered persons in greater Boston. Boston: J. S. I. Research and Training Institute Inc.

Grossman, A. H., D'Augelli, A. R., & Slater, N. P. (2006). Male-to-female transgender youth: Gender expression milestones, gender atypicality, victimization, and parents' responses. Journal of GLBT Family Studies, 2(1), 71-92.

Herbst, J. H., Jacobs, E. D., Finlayson, T. J., McKleroy, V. S., Neumann, M. S., Crepas, N. (2007). Estimating HIV prevalence and risk behaviors of transgender persons in the United States: A systematic review. Aids Behavior, DOI 10.1007/S10461-007-92993.

Kammerer, N., Mason, T., Connors, M., & Durkee, R. (2001). Transgender health and social service needs in the context of HIV risk. In W. Bockting & S. Kirk (Eds.), Transgender and HIV: Risks prevention and care (39-57). Binghamton, NY: Haworth.

Kenagy, G. P.(2005). The health and social service needs of transgender people in Philadelphia. International Journal of Transgenderism, 3(2/3), 49-56.

Kenagy, G. P., & Bostwick, W. B.(2005). Health and social service needs of transgender people in Chicago. International Journal of Transgenderism, 3(2/3), 57-66.

Kuiper, B., & Cohen-Kettenis, P. (1988). Sex reassignment surgery: a study of 141 Dutch transsexuals. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 17(5), 439-457.

Lev, A. I. (2004). Transgender emergence: Therapeutic guidelines for working with gender-variant people and their families. Binghampton, NY: Haworth Press.

Lundstrom, B., Pauly, I., & Walinder, J. (1984). Outcome of sex reassignment surgery. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavia, 70, 289-94.

Lurie, S.(2005). Identifying training needs of health-care providers related to treatment and care of transgendered patients: A qualitative needs assessment conducted in New England. International Journal of Transgenderism, 3(2/3), 93-112.

Meyer III, W., Bockting, W., Cohen-Kettenis, P., Coleman, E., DiCeglie, D., Devor, H., et al. (2001). The standards of care for gender identity disorders, sixth version. International Journal of Transgenderism, 5(1). Retrieved January 15, 2007, from http://www.symposion.com/ijt/soc_2001/index.htm.

Minter, S. (2003). Representing transsexual clients: Selected legal issues. Retrieved May 25, 2006, from: http://www.transgenderlaw.org/resources/translaw.htm

Nemoto, T., Operario, D., & Keatley, J. (2005). Health and social services for male-to-female transgender persons of color in San Francisco. International Journal of Transgenderism, 3(2/3), 5-20.

Newfield, E., Hart, S., Dibble, S., & Kohler, L. (2006). Female-to-male transgender quality of life. Quality of Life Research, 15(9), 1447-1457.

Paige, R. U. (2005). Proceedings of the American Psychological Association, Incorporated for the legislative year 2004: Minutes of the Annual meeting of the Council of Representatives July 28 and 30, 2004, Honolulu, HI. Retrieved November 18 2004 from http://www.apa.org/governance/. (To be published in Volume 60, Issue Number 5 of the American Psychologist.)

Paige, R. U. (2007). Proceedings of the American Psychological Association for the legislative year 2006. Minutes of the annual meeting of the Council of Representatives, February 17-19, 2006, and August 9 and 13, 2006, New Orleans, LA and Minutes of the February, June, August, September, and December 2006 Meetings of the Board of Directors. American Psychologist, 62 (Forthcoming in July/August 2007 ). [Retrieved January 12, 2007 from http://www.apa.org/pi/prejudice_discrimination_resolution.pdf].

Petersen, M., Stephens, J., Dickey, R., & Lewis, W. (1996). Transsexuals within the prison system: An international survey of correctional services policies. Behavioral Sciences and the Law, 14 , 219, 221-222.

Pfafflin, F., & Junge, A. (1998). Sex reassignment thirty years of international follow-up studies SRS: A comprehensive review, 1961-1991. Dusseldorf, Germany: Symposium Publishing.

Rachlin, K. (2002). Transgendered individuals’ experiences of psychotherapy.International Journal of Transgenderism, 6(1), available at http://www.symposion.com/ijt/.

Rehman, J., Lazer, S., Benet, A. E., Schaefer, L. C., & Melman, A. (1999). The reported sex and surgery satisfaction of 28 postoperative male-to-female transsexual patients. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 28(1): 71-89.

Risser, J. M. H., Shelton, A., McCurdy, S., Atkinson, J., Padgett, P., Useche, B., et al.(2005). Sex, drugs, violence, and HIV status among male-to-female transgender persons in Houston, Texas. International Journal of Transgenderism, 3(2/3), 67-74.

Rodriquez-Madera, S., & Toro-Alfonso, J. (2005). Gender as an obstacle in HIV/AIDS prevention: Considerations for the development of HIV/AIDS prevention efforts for male-to-female transgenders. International Journal of Transgenderism, 3(2/3), 113-122.

Ross, M. W., & Need, J. A. (1989). Effects of adequacy of gender reassignment surgery on psychological adjustment: A follow-up of fourteen male-to-female patients. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 18(2), 145-153.

Spade, D. (2003). Resisting medicine, re/modeling gender. Berkeley Women’s Law Journal, 18(15), 15-37.

Sperber, J., Landers, S., & Lawrence, S.(2005). Access to health care for transgendered persons: Results of a needs assessment in Boston. International Journal of Transgenderism, 3(2/3), 75-92.

Smith Y. L. S., Van Goozen, S. H. M., Kuiper, A. J., & Cohen-Kettenis, P. T. (2005). Sex reassignment: Outcomes and predictors of treatment for adolescent and adult transsexuals. Psychological Medicine, 35, 89-99.

Van Kestern, P. J. M., Asscheman, H., Megens, J. A. J., & Gooren, L. J. G. (1997). Mortality and morbidity in transsexual subjects treated with cross-sex hormones, Clinical Endocrinology, 47, 337-342.

Witten , T. M., & Eyler, A. E. (2007). Transgender aging and the care of the elderly transgendered patient. In R. Ettner, S. Monstrey, & A. E. Eyler (Eds.), Principles of Transgender Medicine and Surgery (pp.343-372). New York: Haworth Press.

Xavier, J. M., Bobbin, M., Singer, B., & Budd, E.(2005). A needs assessment of transgendered people of color living in Washington, DC. International Journal of Transgenderism, 3(2/3), 31-48.

G.(39) Council received an update on the business pending item “Proposed Resolution on Families of Incarcerated Offenders.”

H.(40) Council received an update on the business pending item “Emancipating and Rehabilitating Enslaved Persons and Prevention of Future Slavery.”

I. (41) Council received an update on the business pending item “Resolution in Support of Ethnic Minority Training in Psychology.”

J.(42) Council received an update on the business pending item “APA Resolution to Promote Well-Being and Alleviate Psychological Risk Factors for Immigrants.”

K.(51) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Amendment Call to Shut Down the Illegal Prison at Guantanamo Bay and All Other Facilities for ‘Enemy’ Combatants.”

L.(52) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Revision of APA’s Statement on Parental Alienation Syndrome.”

M.(53) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Value Neutral Language for End-of-Life Choices.”

XIII. ETHNIC MINORITY AFFAIRS

A.(46) Council received as information a report of the activities and programs of the CEMRRAT2 Task Force.


XIV. INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS

No items.

CENTRAL OFFICE

No items.

FINANCIAL AFFAIRS

A.(31) Council voted to approve amending the Association Rules as follows (bracketed material to be deleted; underlined material to be added):

210-2. BUDGET

210-2.1 In the financial policy of the APA, a distinction shall be made between general programs, direct service programs, and support functions.

General programs (e.g. scientific affairs, public affairs) shall be supported by the dues of the membership and by any surplus of income over expenses generated from the direct service programs. General programs do not render a direct service but rather are activities that are intended to benefit psychology as a whole.

A direct service program provides to individuals or organizations a product, benefit, or service for a fee. The financial goals for each current direct service program such as CE Credit Programs, Convention, Publications and Databases and Sponsor Approval shall be set annually by the Chief Executive Officer during the budget process.[are as follows:

Convention goal: to produce a 12% profit (over allocations) annually over a 5-year period of time.

Sponsor Approval Goal: to produce a 10% profit (over allocations) annually over a 5-year period of time.

CE Credit Programs Goal: to produce a 5% profit (over allocations) annually over a 5-year period of time and that the least profitable activities are considered for eliminations if it is deemed necessary to meet the established goal.

Communications Goal: shall be set annually by the Chief Executive Officer during the budget process.]

These overall financial goals should be considered with APA’s commitment to providing programs and services that meet the changing priorities of the association.

Support functions comprise administrative or other services potentially used by all programs/offices of the Association, excluding common-use space and benefits which are direct charged. Support functions (e.g., human resources, administrative services) shall be conducted so that the total costs (including allocated costs) do not exceed 15% of the total gross expenses of the Association. The support functions shall have their net costs reallocated to program areas as indirect expense.

Financial plans shall be made with the aim of insuring that only necessary expenses shall be incurred in carrying out policies and programs approved by Council and that those expenses are consistent with the need to maintain a reasonable standard of performance. With respect to income, financial plans shall maximize income from all sources other than dues and shall support programs consistent with the basic objectives and professional standards of the APA. Membership dues shall be used essentially as a means for compensating for the difference between income and expenses resulting from Association programs. It shall be the goal to present a surplus budget annually (after consideration of the cash flow from building operations) of between 1% and 2% of budgeted revenues, in order to provide a basis for orderly expansion of operations and services in successive years and to provide a margin of safety against contingencies.

B.(32) Council voted to approve the 2009 Preliminary Budget, in principle, calling for a 2008 probable deficit of $937,900 and a surplus of $721,100 for the 2009 Preliminary Budget. This 2009 Preliminary Budget shall serve as the framework for the 2009 Final Budget that will be presented to Council for approval in February of 2009.

Consistent with the actions of Council in August 2000 and 2002 to institute the practice of increasing the APA base member dues and graduate student affiliate fees annually by an amount linked to the consumer price index for all urban consumers (CPI-U), Council voted to approve a $8 in the APA base member dues ($279 to $287) and a $1 increase in the graduate student affiliate fee from $51 to $52.

C.(33) Council voted to approve the Net Asset Allocation Plan including the Financial Forecast for 2009-2011 as follows:

2009-2011 Financial Forecast and Net Asset Allocation Plan

1. The goal for attainment of net assets as stated in Association Rule 210-3 is reaffirmed; namely, that the Association strives to maintain net assets equal to at least one year’s operating budget.

2. Consistent with accounting practices, conventional wisdom and comparable financial data from other organizations, the Association should not consider any portion of theoretical building equity toward attainment of the net assets goal mentioned in item 1 above.

3. Currently, rather than specifically set aside funds outside the normal budget process for development of programs deemed to be of high priority to the membership, the Association enthusiastically supports consideration of proposals (in the form of a business plan) for new revenue generating ideas. [Such proposals for new revenue generating ideas should be thoroughly detailed including all direct costs, indirect costs, and staff costs. Such proposals reviewed by the FC, the Board and approved by the COR, will be funded out of ongoing revenues or out of the Association’s net assets, as necessary, assuming that full consideration is also given to the impact of such funding on progress towards the Association’s net assets goal mentioned in item 1 above.]

4. Each year, based on actual results and an analysis of our net assets, future financial forecasts and the net asset allocation plan will be adjusted accordingly.

5. Once the net asset goals are attained, any number of future actions could be taken including the long-term stabilization of dues; the long-term availability of funds for the development of programs deemed to be of high priority to the membership; further apportionment of building and investment proceeds toward operational expenses, etc.

6. The specific Financial Forecast for 2009 – 2011 is as follows:

  1. Strive to attain a net asset goal equal to at least one year’s operating budget consistent with Association Rule 210-3;

  2. Include $3.5M net cash flow from building operations in the operating budget as a regular source of revenue (consistent with Council’s action of February 2008);

  3. Include funding in the operating budget for the Public Education Campaign, Psychology Public Education Campaign (planning), Academic Enhancement Initiative and PSY21, through the forecast period (2009 – 2011);

  4. Restrict capital expenditures to no more than $12M over the forecast period (this limit excludes the capital purchases planned as part of the Web Relaunch designation);

  5. Continue to reinvest net realized gains/losses from our long-term portfolio activity;

  6. Reinvest all interest/dividends from our long-term portfolio activity (during 2009, the CEO has proposed that long-term interest/dividends be transferred to supplement operations);

  7. Treat Federal income tax expenses as non-operating activity;

  8. Treat all real estate cash flow in excess of $3.5M annually from building operations as an increase to net assets (increase to investment and/or debt extinguishment) after the operating line of credit has been paid off;

  9. Continue to pay down the long-term debt (under the newly refinanced terms of the APA 750 LLC and Series B loans and the corresponding renegotiated swaps). No sale of our real estate is anticipated over this forecast period; and,

  10. To present annual budgets that are consistent with Association Rule 210-2.1 that calls for a surplus of between 1% and 2% of budgeted revenues (after consideration of the cash flow from buildings) in order to provide a basis for orderly expansion of operations and services in successive years and to provide a margin of safety against contingencies.

D.(47) Council received as information an update on the APA building debt refinance.

E.(48) Council received as information a copy of APA’s 2007 IRS 990 Tax Form.

F.(49) Council received as information the Argy, Wiltse & Robinson, P.C. 2007 Audit-Related Reports.

G.(50) Council received as information the draft minutes of the May 30 & 31, 2008, Finance Committee meeting.

On Wednesday morning, Council received updates regarding the Task Force on Council Representation and efforts of Divisions and State/Provincial/Territorial Associations regarding the ballot to provide voting seats on Council to the National Ethnic Minority Associations.

On Wednesday afternoon, the Division 46 media awards were presented.

On Sunday morning, the 2008 Raymond D. Fowler member award was presented to Charles L. Brewer, PhD. Presidential Citations were awarded to Norman Abeles, PhD; David B. Baker, PhD, and Annette M. La Greca, PhD.

On Sunday morning, Council participated in a follow-up exercise to the diversity training session on sexual orientation and gender identity that took place at the February 2008 Council meeting.

On Sunday morning, Dr. Baker gave a presentation on the Akron Archives.