Council of Representatives Approved Minutes: February 20-22, 1998

I. MINUTES OF MEETING

A.(1) Council voted to approve the minutes of the August 14 & 17, 1997, Council of Representatives meeting.

II. ELECTIONS, AWARDS, MEMBERSHIP AND HUMAN RESOURCES

A.(2) Council voted to approve amending Association Rule 110-12.2 as follows (bracketed material to deleted; underlined material to be added):

110-12 CHIEF STAFF OFFICER RECONFIRMATION

110-12.2 Reconfirmation requires a two-thirds affirmative vote of those voting. Those eligible to vote for reconfirmation shall be the current Council [having the longest familiarity with the chief staff officer's performance, as determined by the Recording Secretary in consultation with the Board of Directors].

B.(3) Council voted to approve amending Association Rule 110-11 as follows (bracketed material to be deleted; underlined material to be added):

110-11. CHIEF STAFF OFFICER EVALUATION

110-11.1 The performance of the chief staff officer shall be subject to an annual review. The Board of Directors is charged with the development of procedures and instruments designed for that purpose. The review shall solicit evaluation from current Council members [seated during the most recent mid-winter meeting of Council], from such other elements of the governance structure as are deemed relevant by the Board, and from appropriate Central Office staff. Upon completing its evaluation of the chief staff officer's performance, the Board will communicate the results to Council in confidence.

C.(4) Council voted to approve amending Association Rule 110-7.1 as follows (bracketed material to be deleted; underlined material to be added):

3. Statement on the issues facing psychology. The candidates' statement [appearing in the APA Monitor] accompanying the ballot should be confined to discussion of issues facing psychology and the APA and should not exceed 1,000 words. [Similarly, the statement appearing on the ballot shall be confined to the issues and be limited to 1,000 words.] The APA Monitor will provide coverage of the candidates in a question and answer format. At the Fall Consolidated meeting, each board and committee reporting to Council or the Board of Directors will be asked to develop questions, which will be reviewed by the Election Committee. Six (6) final questions reflecting important issues to APA's various constituencies will be selected and presented to each candidate. Their written responses will be edited for APA style by Monitor editors and returned to the candidates for approval and will appear, in a table format, over three subsequent issues of the APA Monitor. The answers will be limited to 100 words each. Each candidate will also be given the opportunity to write a short statement, not to exceed 300 words, as a lead into their questions and answers. The Past President, as chair of the Election Committee, is responsible for enforcing these limitations.

Alice Chang, PhD, recused herself from voting on this item.

D.(5) Council voted to approve amending Article VIII, Section 6, of the APA Bylaws as follows (underlined material to be added):

6. The Past President shall be the most recently retired President and shall chair the Election Committee. The Past President shall not be eligible to appear as a candidate on the President- elect election ballot.

Council voted not to include pro/con statements with the Bylaw ballot. Alice Chang, PhD, recused herself from voting on this item.

E.(6) Council voted to approve amending Association Rule 110-13. as follows (bracketed material to be deleted; underlined material to be added):

110-13. ELECTION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS

110-13.2 Members are elected by and from the previous Council. Members of the Board of Directors shall not serve simultaneously on APA governance groups, other than as ex-officio or liaison, [the boards] or [similar] on governing bodies of advocacy or political action organizations for psychologists or psychology that are national in scope. Nominations for the Board of Directors shall be by ballot distributed to members of the previous Council. Each Council member will be allowed to nominate twice as many candidates as there are vacancies.

F.(55) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Creation of a New Membership Category.”

G.(56) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Multi-Year Memberships.”

III. ETHICS

A.(24) Council voted to allocate $11,000 from its 1998 contingency fund to support one additional meeting of the Ethics Code Task Force.

B.(42) Council received as information and in confidence the names of members who have been allowed to resign under stipulated conditions.

C.(43) Council received an update on the “Policy on Barring Resignations During Ethics Investigations.”

D.(44) Council received as information the revised statement regarding “Services by Telephone, Teleconferencing and Internet.”

IV. BOARD OF DIRECTORS

A.(39) A new business item on “Mandatory Minimum Sentencing Laws” was referred to COLI, the Board for the Advancement of Psychology in the Public Interests (BAPPI), the Board of Scientific Affairs (BSA) and the Policy and Planning Board (P&P).

B.(41) A new business item on “Amendment to Association Rule 100-1.5' was referred to COLI, the Committee on Division/APA Relations (CODAPAR), BSA, P&P and the Board of Professional Affairs (BPA).

C.(45) Council received as information the proposal for the establishment of an Institute on Families, Marriage and Divorce.

D.(46) Council received information on the establishment of the ongoing COLI Subcommittee on APA/American Bar Association (ABA) Relations.

E.(57) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Making Provisions for Death, Disablement or Retirement.”

F.(58) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Legislative Remedies for Conflicting Law.”

G.(59) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Fostering Career Development of Young Professionals.”

V. DIVISIONS AND STATE AND PROVINCIAL ASSOCIATIONS

A.(7) Council voted to postpone to its August 1998 meeting the item “Development of a Division Dispute Resolution Mechanism.”

B.(8) Council voted to approve amending Association Rule 100-3 as follows (bracketed material to be deleted; underlined material to be added):

100-3 DIVISION NAME CHANGE

100-3.1 A division may change its name as long as the change: a) does not extend the scope of the scientific and/or professional field for which the division was recognized at the time it was established by the Council of Representatives; and b) is not inimical to the welfare of any other division. In order to avoid conflict, no division name change shall [be voted upon by a division or] become effective until there has been compliance with the following procedures [are first complied with].
100-3.2 A division desiring to change its name shall give written notice of the proposed name change to the APA Recording Secretary. The division shall provide with the notice whatever information it deems appropriate to explain or support the proposed name change. The Recording Secretary shall notify all divisions and members of Council of the proposed name change and provide them with a copy of the notice of proposed name change. The Secretary shall advise the divisions and members of Council that any objections to the name change must be received by the Recording Secretary within 60 days of the date of the Secretary's notice. All objections by divisions or members of Council must be in writing and shall fully state the basis for objection. The objections shall be submitted to the proposing division for consideration and resolution. Dispute resolution may be invoked through CODAPAR if helpful. If objections are [received] not resolved, the proposed name change will be submitted to the Council of Representatives for decision.
100-3.3 If no objections are received or if objections received during the comment period are resolved, the proposed name change may become effective after the 60 day notice period has expired. If the proposed name change is submitted to Council, it may become effective only after Council's approval. No name change, however, whether approved by lack of objection or by vote of Council, may become effective until approved by the proposing division in the manner required by the division's applicable bylaws, rules or procedures.

C.(9) Council voted to approve amending Association Rule 90-10 as follows (underlined material to be added):

90-10 COMMITTEE ON DIVISION/APA RELATIONS

CODAPAR shall consist of six members, each serving a three year term, and shall report to Council through the Board of Directors. Two new members of CODAPAR will be appointed annually. Nominations will be solicited from divisions, with each division invited to submit a nominee for CODAPAR. Eligible nominees are APA members who are the division's president or another officer or board member for that division. Upon receipt of division nominations, CODAPAR will submit to the Board of Directors a listing of nominees along with its recommendation for achieving balance in representation of the broad interests of divisions as designated in defined slates. An additional goal shall be to achieve diversity among CODAPAR members by striving to obtain gender balance and at least one member from underrepresented groups. The Board of Directors will appoint two new members annually from the slates submitted by CODAPAR.

D.(60) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Enhancing Inter-divisional Activity.”

VI. ORGANIZATION OF THE APA

A.(10) Council discussed the item “Policy and Planning Board Review.”

VII. PUBLICATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS

A.(47) Council received as information a publications update. The P&C Board made one editorial appointment in 1997, for 1998: James L. Dannemiller, PhD (Developmental). The P&C Board opened four searches in 1997 for new editors for Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology, Journal of Counseling Psychology, JEP: Human Perception and Performance, and Clinician's Research Digest. The P&C Board established a task force to look into the pages used and the editorial coverage of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology sections. The P&C Board established a task force to examine variances in editorial office budgets. The P&C Board established a task force to examine internet publication/distribution of material and recommended that the 1996 P&C Board interim policy statement regarding the posting of abstracts and articles be replaced by a new 1997 interim policy statement. The first 'issue' of the joint American Psychological Association/American Psychiatric Association all-electronic journal became available on the APA web site in September of 1997. Work to digitize the 1995, 1996, and 1997 volumes of all APA and EPF journals was completed, thereby creating the APA Full-Text Article Database, which was made available for experimental use by members on December 15, 1997, and will be available to members only in 1998 on a fee-for-access basis. The digitization of the 'Historic' Psychological Abstracts was also completed and made publicly available in 1997. The PsycINFO database now covers the journal literature in psychology from 1887 to date, or 111 years (covering the entire period during which psychology has been a separate, recognized discipline). PsycINFO 111 was unveiled at the August convention, was available free for members' experimental use during the fall, and will be available to members only on a free-for-access basis in 1998. The installation of a new PsycINFO production computer was completed early in 1997; enhancements to the production software system and higher proficiency levels of multi-skilled staff meant that PsycINFO was able to create and/or edit almost 79,000 abstracts of journal articles, technical reports, books, and chapters in the calendar year 1997. This is an increase from our average of 54,000 records per year during 1990-1995. APA Books released 52 books in 1997. APA Board of Directors authorized the purchase of Magination Press (formerly owned by Bruner-Mazel), a trade imprint of more than 50 titles for children and young adults that focus on clinical and sub-clinical problems and fears. For the APA/Oxford University Press Encyclopedia of Psychology, over 1,350 author nominees have accepted invitations and are currently under contract to write entries for the project. Subscriptions closed 1997 at a count of 387,000, which represented a 5% drop mostly in individual member subscriptions from 1996. APA publications were exhibited and sold at more than two dozen professional and library or bookseller conventions in 1997. Advertising sales for 1997 will be in the $2.4 million range and exhibit booth sales showed an improvement over 1996 with over $385,000 in sales for this year. The year marked the routinization of Monitor classified advertising posted to the APA website, PsycNET, making job opening and other classified advertisements more widely available than ever before.

B.(61) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Editorial Service and the APA Membership.”

VIII. CONVENTION AFFAIRS

A.(41F) A new business item on “APA's Environmental Responsibility” was referred to the Board of Convention Affairs (BCA) and BAPPI.

IX. EDUCATIONAL AFFAIRS

A.(11) Council voted to approve the following resolution regarding the Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards (ASPPB) Reciprocity Agreement:

WHEREAS the evolution of the discipline of psychology is best served if the profession can recognize and adopt clear and reasonable standards for practice, and
WHEREAS it is in the public interest that patterns of education, training, licensure and credentialing be coherent and orderly, and
WHEREAS it is also in the public interest that the practicing psychologists be able to move from jurisdiction to jurisdiction without undue impediments to the pursuit of their careers, and
WHEREAS each state and provincial board must nonetheless continue to be vested with the autonomous authority to act in the best interest of its citizenry,
THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Council of Representatives endorses the principle of reciprocity for licensed psychologists and supports efforts to accomplish this.

B.(12) Council voted to approve the following motions based on recommendations of the Commission for the Recognition of Specialties and Proficiencies Professional Psychology (CRSPPP):

1. The Council of Representatives formally confirms the continued recognition of School Psychology as a specialty in professional psychology. Council also approves the archival description of the specialty of school psychology and, at the request of the petitioners, will not make the archival description of the specialty a formal policy statement of APA until August 1998.
2. The Council of Representatives formally confirms the recognition of Psychoanalytic Psychology as a specialty in professional psychology.
3. The Council of Representatives formally confirms the recognition of Geropsychology as a recognized proficiency in professional psychology.

C.(13) A new business item on “Prescriptive Authority Curriculum” was withdrawn.

D.(25) Council voted to allocate $20,800 from its 1998 contingency fund to support two meetings in 1998 of the Working Group on Review of the Sponsor Approval System.

E.(26) Council directed the Board of Educational Affairs (BEA) to appoint six persons from key vocational, educational and developmental divisions to meet in conjunction with the fall consolidated board meetings in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Education School to Work Opportunities Office. Council allocated $4,000 from its 1998 contingency funds to cover the costs associated with the meeting.

F.(27) Council voted to allocate $15,000 from its 1998 contingency fund to support the continuation of the APA Advisory Council on Genetic Issues.

G.(28) Council voted to allocate $6,000 from its 1998 contingency fund to support one two-day meeting of the six-person Task Force on Specialty and Proficiency Titles to be held concurrently with the next regularly scheduled meeting of CRSPPP.

H.(41B) A new business item on “Guidelines for Education and Training at the Doctoral Level in Industrial/Organizational Psychology” was referred to BEA, BPA, P&P, BSA, COLI and BAPPI.

I.(41C) A new business item on “Amendment to Association Rule 120-4.1' was referred to BEA, the Continuing Education Committee (CEC), BSA, BAPPI, the Committee for the Advancement of Professional Practice (CAPP), BPA and P&P.

J.(48) Council received as information the CRSPPP Operating Procedures and Interpretive Guidelines.

K.(49) Council received information on the new business item on “Residency Equivalency.”

L.(50) Council received information on the establishment of the 1998 American Psychological Foundation Presidential Scholars Awards.

M.(51) Council received as information a report from the Advisory Council on Genetic Issues.

N.(52) Council received information on the development of training materials in psychopharmacology.

O.(52A) Council received information on the appointments made to the Committee on Accreditation.

P.(62) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Bar to Service in the Accreditation Process.”

X. PROFESSIONAL AFFAIRS

A.(14) Council voted to adopt the Guidelines for Psychological Evaluations in Child Protection Matters.

B.(15) Council voted to adopt the Guidelines for the Evaluation of Dementia and Age-Related Cognitive Decline prepared by the Presidential Task Force on the Assessment of Age-Consistent Memory Decline and Dementia.

C.(16) Council voted to approve the affiliation of the Psychologists' Association of Alberta with the American Psychological Association.

D.(17) A new business item on “Policy About Alternative Sources of Funding” was withdrawn.

E.(29) Council discussed the item on “Credential Repository and Verification Service for Psychologists.”

F.(30) Council voted to reject a motion requesting the establishment of a Department of Marketing within APA.

G.(40) A new business item on “Assessment Criteria for Adaptive Behavior Deficits in Mentally Retarded Children and Adults” was referred to BPA, CAPP, and the Committee on Psychological Tests and Assessment (CPTA).

H.(41D) A new business item on “Sources of Funding Policy” was referred to CAPP, the Finance Committee, BPA, P&P and COLI.

I.(53) Council received an update on the development of a psychopharmacology examination.

J.(63) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Resolution on Stigma and Discrimination toward People with Serious Mental Illness and Severe Emotional Disturbance.”

K.(64) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Coalition Building to Design and to Implement Health Care Reform.”

L.(65) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Provisional Licensure for Post- Doctoral Psychologists.”

M.(66) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “A Taxonomy for Professional Psychology.”

XI. SCIENTIFIC AFFAIRS

A.(18) Council voted to adopt the following resolution regarding the Decade of Behavior:

WHEREAS it is necessary to improve public awareness of and support for the many exciting advances in the behavioral and social sciences and their application in addressing many of our nations's most pressing problems;

WHEREAS it will be necessary to bring together government agencies, scientific societies, private foundations and health agencies for the joint sponsorship of public and professional education programs to promote the behavioral and social sciences and their application;

WHEREAS it will be necessary to encourage and support the development of the next generation of behavioral and social scientists and practitioners; and
 
WHEREAS it will be necessary to increase research funding for the behavioral and social sciences,
 
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the American Psychological Association initiate efforts to have the years 2000-2010 declared the “Decade of Behavior” by the U.S. Congress, and furthermore that the APA Science Directorate launch the planning activities for the Decade of Behavior in 1998.

B.(31) Council voted to allocate $16,000 from its 1998 contingency fund to support two meetings of the Test User Qualifications Task Force in 1998.

XII. PUBLIC INTEREST

A.(19) Council voted to adopt the following resolution:

APA Resolution on Immigrant Children, Youth, and Families
Whereas the largest proportion of the population of the United States of America is composed of people whose ancestors immigrated to this country from other lands (Fix & Passel, 1994);
 
Whereas immigrants to the United States, categorized as foreign-born in the U.S. Bureau of the Census reports, are a diverse group including both documented and undocumented individuals who make up 8% of the current population (U.S. Bureau of the Census, 1993) and include 2.1 million foreign-born children who together with second-generation immigrant children constitute the fastest-growing segment of the U.S. population under age 15 (Fix & Zimmerman, 1993; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1996);
 
Whereas the experience of immigration has immediate implications for the psychological and social well-being of individuals and families (Beiser, 1988; Westermeyer, Williams, and Neguyen, 1991) which are especially intense for children, people of color, people of the impoverished socioeconomic classes (Fix & Passel, 1994), as well as women (Yee, 1997; Yee, Huang, & Lew, in press), lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons (Espin, 1997; Patterson, 1995), and individuals with disabilities;
 
Whereas immigrants to the United States experience unique stresses, prejudice, and poverty and can be considered at-risk subpopulations for health, emotional and behavioral problems (Eisenbruch, 1988; Williams & Berry, 1991) as well as, in the case of children, learning and academic difficulties (Rousseau, Drapeau, and Corin, 1996);
 
Whereas 23.4% of all foreign-born residents including children and youth, who entered the United States from 1980 to 1990 are now at or below the poverty level, as compared to 9.5% of the native (i.e., U.S.-born) population (U. S. Bureau of the Census, 1993);
 
Whereas, in addition to poverty, the challenges of exploitation and isolation are faced by some immigrants, such as service workers from Asia and Haiti (Andersen, 1997; Amott & Matthaei, 1991); and migrant farm workers from Mexico and Central or South America (Olivera, Effland, & Hamm, 1993) whose children often leave school to enter the migrant stream to work with their parents, since few states set minimum age limits for child farm labor (Fuentes, 1974; DiPerna, 1981; Martinez, Scott, Cranston-Gingras, & Platt, 1994; Wilk, 1986);
 
Whereas mental health-related issues, particularly stress associated with trauma, acculturation to language, economics, health care, education, religion, as well as encounters with both individual and institutional bias, are faced consistently by foreign-born residents of this country (Kraut, 1994; Portes & Rumbaut, 1996) and differential degrees of acculturation within immigrant families can negatively affect family communication and even evoke conflict, particularly between parents and their adolescent offspring (Pedersen, Draguns, Lonner, and Trimble, 1996; Ponterotto, Casas, Suzuki, and Alexander, 1995);
 
Whereas health, disease-specific prevention -- particularly HIV prevention and treatment (Ryan, Tapscott, Carde, Havenner, Keene, Smith, & Bell , 1992) -- mental health, and social services are under-utilized by foreign-born resident populations (Beiser, 1988), especially refugees (Beiser, 1988), migrant workers, and undocumented immigrants (Wilk, 1986), and such services are unavailable in many locations;
 
Whereas foreign immigration has periodically evoked in the citizenry negative perceptions and feelings that find expression in executive and legislative initiatives that attempt to limit immigrants' civil rights and access to public benefits such as education and other human services for children, youth, and families (Board on Children and Families, 1995; Degler, 1970; Goldenberg, 1996);
 
Whereas a review of the literature in American psychology journals shows scant attention to these issues while policies and programs for immigrant children, youth, and families are being established despite the paucity of scientific data on this population (Board on Children and Families, 1995);
 
Therefore be it resolved that the American Psychological Association, an organization that is committed to promoting the psychological well-being of children, youth, and families:
 
(1) advocates for the development of a scientific data base concerning the adaptation, development, education, health, and mental health, as well as the social impact and contributions, of immigrant and refugee populations;
 
(2) supports efforts to increase funding for research about the adaptation, development, education, health, and mental health of diverse immigrant children, youth, and families;
 
(3) promotes and facilitates psychologists' acquisition of competencies, including relevant cultural knowledge, attitude, and skills in providing services to and conducting research on immigrant children, youth, and families;
 
(4) advocates and promotes efforts to increase the availability of and access to educational, health, mental health, and social services for immigrant children, youth, and families; and
 
(5) promotes and supports public policies that recognize and provide for the psychosocial needs of immigrant children, youth, and families.
References

Andersen, M.L. (1997). Thinking about women: Sociological perspectives on sex and gender. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Amott, T.L., & Matthaei, J. A. (1991). Race, gender, and work: A multicultural history of women in the United States. Boston: South End Press.

Beiser, M. (1988). After the door has ppened: Mental health issues affecting immigrants and refugees in Canada. Ottawa: Health and Welfare Canada.

Board on Children and Families, Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, National Research Council, Institute of Medicine (1995). Immigrant children and their families: Issues for research and policy. The Future of Children, 5, 72-89.

Degler, C. (1970). Out of our past: The forces that shaped modern America. New York: Harper & Row.

DiPerna, P. (1981, July 27). The lethal cloud of indifference. The Nation, 786-789.

Eisenbruch, M. (1988). The mental health of refugee children and their cultural development. International Migration Review, 22, 282-300.

Espin, O. (1997). Crossing borders and boundaries: The life narratives of immigrant lesbians. In Greene, B. (Ed.), Psychological perspectives on lesbian and gay issues: Vol. 3. Ethnic and cultural diversity among lesbians and gay men (pp.191-215) Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Fix, M., & Passel, J. S. (1994). Immigration and immigrants: Setting the record straight. Washington, DC: The Urban Institute.

Fix, M., & Zimmerman, W. (May 1993). Educating immigrant children: Chapter 1 in the changing city. Washington, DC: The Urban Institute 93-3. A report of the immigration policy program.

Fuentes, J. A. (1974). The need for effective and comprehensive planning for migrant workers. American Journal of Public Health, 64, 2-4.

Goldenberg, C. (1996). Latin American immigration and U.S. schools. Social Policy Report, Society for Research in Child Development, 10, (1). Ann Arbor, MI.

Kraut, A. M. (1994). Silent travelers: Germs, genes, and the 'immigrant menace.' New York: Basic Books.

Martinez, Y. G., Scott, J., Cranston-Gingras, A., & Platt, J. S. (1994). Voices from the field: Interviews with students from migrant farm worker families. Journal of Educational Issues of Language Minority Students, 14, 333-348.

Olivera, V., Effland, J. R., & Hamm, S. (1993). Hired farm labor use on fruit, vegetable, and horticultural specialty farms. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Patterson, C.J. (1995). Sexual orientation and human development: An overview. Developmental Psychology, 31, (3-11).

Pedersen, P. B., Draguns, J. G., Lonner, W. J., & Trimble, J. E. (1996). Counseling across cultures (4th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Ponterotto, J. G., Casas, J. M., Suzuki, L.A., & Alexander, C.M. (1995). Handbook of multicultural counseling. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Portes, A. & Rumbaut, R. G. (1996). Immigrant America: A portrait (2nd.ed.) Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

Rousseau, C., Drapeau, A., & Corin, E. (1996). School performance and emotional problems in refugee children. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 66, (2), 239-251.

Ryan, C., Tapscott, J., Carde, H., Havenner, S., Keene, D., Smith, M., & Bell, D. (1992).

Language, cultural and psychological barriers to access. Agency for HIV/AIDS, District of Columbia Comprehensive HIV/AIDS Plan 1992-1996. p.3-3. Agency for HIV/AIDS: District of Columbia.

U. S. Bureau of the Census (1993, July). The foreign-born population in the United States, 1990 census of the population. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Commerce.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (1996). Trends in the well-being of America's children and youth: 1996. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation.

Westermeyer, J., Williams, C. L., & Neguyen, A. N. (1991). Mental health services for refugees. DHHS Publication No. [ADM] 91-1824). Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office.

Williams, C. L. & Berry, J. W. (1991). Primary prevention of acculturative stress among refugees: Application of psychological theory and practice. American Psychologist, 46, 632-641.

Wilk, V. A. (1986). The occupational health of migrant and seasonal farm workers in the United States (2nd edition). Washington, DC: Farm worker Justice Fund, Inc.

Yee, B. W. K. (1997). The social and cultural content of adaptation of aging among Southeast Asian elders. In J. Sokolovsky (Ed.), The cultural context of aging, 2nd Edition, New York: Greenwood Publishers.

Yee, B. W. K.; Huang, L. N. & Lew, A. (In press). Asian and Pacific Islander families: Life spansocialization in a cultural context. In L. L. Lee & N. Zane (Eds.), Handbook of Asian American Psychology, Vol. I, Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications.

B.(19A) A new business item on “Identification, Treatment, Research and Reporting of Domestic Violence” was withdrawn.

B.(32) Council voted to allocate $4,000 from its 1998 contingency funds to cover the costs of up to three APA members who are content experts attending two meetings of the Committee on Women in Psychology (CWP) to work with CWP in evaluating issues associated with recruitment, retention and progress of women in psychology throughout their careers in academia.

C.(33) Council voted to allocate $4000 to cover the costs of three APA members who are content experts attending two 1998 meetings of the Committee on Disability Issues in Psychology to assist the committee in investigating psychological research and treatment issues specific to persons with physical disabilities.

D.(41E) A new business item on “Affirmative Action” was referred to BAPPI, BEA, P&P and COLI.

E.(41G) A new business item on “Approval of Funding for the Five Year Plan of the Commission on Ethnic Minority Recruitment, Retention and Training in Psychology (CEMRRAT) was referred to BAPPI, the Finance Committee, BPA, BEA, BSA, P&P.

F.(67) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Identification, Treatment, Research and Reporting of Domestic Violence.”

G.(68) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Identification, Training and Organizational Responses to Workplace Violence.”

H.(69) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Proposed Resolution on Creating an APA Task Force on Pro Bono Affairs.”

I.(70) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Task Force on Guidelines for Psychologists Working in the Area of Family Violence.”

J.(71) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Physician Assisted Suicide.”

K.(72) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Legal Benefits for Same Sex Couples.”

L.(73) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Convention Projects in Site Cities.”

XIII. ETHNIC MINORITY AFFAIRS

A.(34) Council voted to authorize the continuation of the National Conversation on Psychology and Racism through 1998 and allocate $8,000 from its 1998 contingency fund to support the development, production and dissemination of National Conversation materials.

B.(35) Council voted to allocate $10,000 from its 1998 contingency fund to establish the CEMRRAT Implementation Fund. Council requested that the Committee on Ethnic Minority Affairs (CEMA) keep the Board of Directors informed of how the funds are utilized.

C.(36) Council voted to allocate $4,000 from its 1998 contingency fund to cover the costs of up to three APA members who are content experts, to be identified by BAPPI and CEMA, with demonstrated competence in the area of ethnic minority recruitment, retention, and training in psychology, who will attend two CEMA meetings in 1998 to assist CEMA in monitoring the APA 5-Year Plan on Ethnic Minority Recruitment, Retention, and Training in Psychology, with periodic reports to the Board and Council.

XIV. INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS

A.(37) Council voted to approve the establishment of an APA International Humanitarian Award and the increase of $2,000 in the APA general awards budget beginning in 1999.

XVI. FINANCIAL AFFAIRS

A.(20) A new business item on “Dues Payment Mechanisms” was withdrawn.

B.(21) Council voted to endorse the need to strengthen and maintain sound financial policy throughout the Association and, accordingly, to approve amending Association Rule 30-1 as follows (bracketed material to be deleted; underlined material to be added):

30-1. PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURES, ORDER OF BUSINESS, AND EXECUTIVE SESSION
30-1.1 The rules contained in Keesey's Modern Parliamentary Procedure shall govern the Association in all cases to which they are applicable and in which they are not inconsistent with the APA Bylaws, the Certificate of Incorporation, and any special rules of order Council shall adopt. The Association Rules is the body of rules of which this rule forms a part. Association Rules shall continue in force until they are amended, repealed, or suspended. A simple majority vote at any regular meeting of Council shall be sufficient to amend or repeal these rules. Amendment and repeal shall take effect at the close of the meeting at which the vote is taken. To suspend [a] the order of business rule requires a two-thirds vote of all Council members present unless the item to be undertaken requires new financial expenditures, in which case suspension of the order of business rule shall require a three-quarters vote of all Council members present. Suspension shall take effect for no longer than needed during the Council meeting to permit a particular action to be undertaken.

C.(22) Council voted to approve the Finance Committee's December 1997 update to the Responsible Spending Report, with the exception of section 1.2 (Retreat Meetings) which was referred back to the Finance Committee by the Board of Directors at their February 1998 meeting.

D.(23) Council discussed the item “Review of APA Employee Compensation Package.”

E.(38) Council voted to 1)approve the 1998 Final Budget with a bottom line deficit of $572,500 (including the building subsidy of $1,000,000 for 1998) to govern operations through 1998; and 2) fund the next $1,000,000 increment of the Public Education Campaign out of 1997 operations.

(Note: Council allocated a total of $102,800 in 1998 contingency funds. The excess of $2,800 was added to the bottom line deficit for 1998.)

F.(38A) Council voted to approve the following motion regarding the 1999 final budget:

Council directs the Board of Directors to bring the Council a proposal for a balanced budget for fiscal year 1999 that does not include a dues increase as a balancing strategy, along with such other responsible options as they deem appropriate. Options that do include a dues increase should include available data regarding how such an increase might affect membership at all levels of organized professional psychology.

G.(41H) A new business item on “Voluntary Contribution for Public Education Campaign” was referred to the Finance Committee, CAPP, BEA, BPA, BSA and the Membership Committee.

H.(54) Council received as information the December 1997 minutes of the Finance Committee.

I.(74) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Setting Priorities for Future APA Budgets.”

J.(75) Council received an update on the new-business-in-progress item “Accountability.”

On Friday morning, Martin E. P. Seligman, PhD, gave the President's update.

On Friday morning, Raymond D. Fowler, PhD, gave the CEO update.

On Friday morning, James L. McHugh, gave a report on Council members' responsibilities in conducting affairs of the Association.

On Saturday afternoon, Rhea Farberman, gave a presentation of the Monitor magazine prototype.

On Sunday morning, Sandra E. Tars, PhD, and Janis V. Sanchez, PhD, presented a report from the Council breakout group discussions held on Friday afternoon regarding the effectiveness of Council and increasing representation of ethnic minorities and other underrepresented groups on Council. Council thanked the Committee on Structure of Function of Council for their work done in preparation of the breakout group discussions, and especially John Alcorn, PhD, and Drs. Tars and Sanchez for compiling the follow-up report to the discussions.

On Sunday morning, Richard McCarty, PhD, Executive Director of the Science Directorate, gave a presentation on the Decade of Behavior.

On Sunday morning, Dr. Seligman thanked Past President Norman Abeles for co-chairing the Council meeting with him and Dr. Seligman and Council thanked Dr. Abeles for the significant and enduring contributions he has made to APA.