Launching careers, changing society

In 2013, APF grants totaling approximately $700,000 helped more than 70 graduate students and early career psychologists launch their careers.

2013 was a landmark year. APF celebrated its 60th anniversary and announced the Campaign to Transform the Future. The campaign will support the many young psychologists and graduate students whose innovative projects have the potential to change the way we think and live in the world.  

In 2013, APF grants totaling approximately $700,000 helped more than 70 graduate students and early career psychologists launch their careers. The effects of APF’s support in their early years will multiply as these psychologists go on to collaborate with colleagues, mentor students, and continue to help people as they advance in the field. 

Decreasing the stigma of mental illness

Matthew Lebowitz, a fourth-year psychology graduate student at Yale University, received the 2013 APF Violet and Cyril Franks Scholarship for his work to mitigate decreases in empathy and accompanying increases in stigmatizing attitudes among clinicians treating mental illness. 

Closing the academic achievement gap

Yamanda Wright, of the University of Texas at Austin, received the APF Kenneth B. and Mamie P. Clark Grant, for her study of elementary school-age children’s intergroup (e.g., race, gender) attitudes and her work on trying to close the disparities in racial achievement in schools. Her APF-funded dissertation examines the relations among racial mistrust, perceptions of discrimination and academic achievement for elementary school-age children.

Preventing suicide in adolescents

Catherine Glenn, PhD, is using her $5,000 Lizette Peterson-Homer Memorial Injury Prevention Grant to understand why the risk of suicide rises so dramatically in adolescence. She plans to use the grant to examine how adolescent-specific neural patterns correlate to suicide risk. She hopes to improve the ability to predict which youth are at greatest risk so that interventions can be targeted. 

Helping military families cope with PTSD

Sarah Campbell, a PhD student in clinical psychology at George Mason University, received the 2013 APF Randy Gerson Memorial Grant to study the dynamic processes that contribute to PTSD-related dysfunction in military couples. Specifically, Campbell will use Bowen Family Systems theory to further the overall understanding of the PTSD-related mechanisms (such as emotional reactivity) that lead to distress in these relationships.