Sexual Dysfunctions

This site covers the following topics:


Female Hypoactive Sexual Desire

Hypoactive sexual desire refers to a deficiency or absence of sexual fantasies and desire for sexual activity. Usually, it occurs in adulthood in association with difficulty obtaining sexual arousal or orgasm, stressful life events, relationship problems, or psychological distress (especially depression).

Some evidence suggests that Hurlbert's Combined Treatment is useful in the treatment of female hypoactive sexual desire. While other psychotherapies may be helpful for treatment of female hypoactive sexual desire, they have not been evaluated scientifically in the same way as the treatment listed here.

For more information on Female Hypoactive Sexual Desire (Inhibited Sexual Desire), please see the National Institute of Mental Health. This page provides a more complete definition and information on treatment.


Female Orgasmic Dysfunction

Female orgasmic dysfunction refers to a delay in or inability to achieve orgasm following a normal sexual arousal phase. Since there is wide variability in the type and intensity of stimulation that triggers orgasm, to be diagnosed with female orgasmic dysfunction, the woman's sexual response should be less than what would be considered reasonable for her age, sexual experience, and the adequacy of sexual stimulation she receives. Female orgasmic dysfunction commonly affects body image, self-esteem, and relationship satisfaction.

Some evidence suggests that Masters and Johnson's Sex Therapy is useful in the treatment of female orgasmic dysfunction. While other psychotherapies may be helpful for treatment of female orgasmic dysfunction, they have not been evaluated scientifically in the same way as the treatment listed here.

For more information on Female Orgasmic Dysfunction, please see medical information on diagnosis, causes, and risk factors at Female Sexual Dysfunction Information.


Sex Offenders

Sex offenders are people, primarily men, who act in a sexually inappropriate manner. More commonly they are referred to as child molesters, incest offenders, exhibitionists and rapists. Child molesters are strangers who sexually abuse children by showing them sexually explicit material, touching them inappropriately, or engaging in sexual relations with them. An incest offender is someone from the child's family who sexually abuses the child. Exhibitionists obtain sexual pleasure by exposing their genitals to a stranger. Rapists force sexual relations on another person and can be someone familiar to the victim or a stranger. The behaviors of these people can cause serious psychological and physical harm to their victims and are illegal in the U.S.

Some evidence suggests that behavior modification is useful in the treatment of sex offenders. While other psychotherapies may be helpful for treatment of sex offenders, they have not been evaluated scientifically in the same way as the treatment listed here.


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