About Us: Member Spotlight Archive

Below are links to previous members who were featured on the site.

 

 

2010 - January: Mitchell Hicks, Ph.D.

2010 - February: John Derbort, Ph.D.

2010 - March: Holly Sweet, Ph.D.

2010 - April: Jack Kahn, Ph.D.

2010 - May-July: Sam Cochran, Ph.D.

2010 - August-September: Bill Johnson II, Ph.D.

2010 - October-December: Judith Logue, Ph.D.

2011 - January-March: Chris Liang, Ph.D.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 

Mitchell Hicks, Ph.D.Mitchell Hicks, Ph.D.

 

Current title/affiliation/professional role(s):

Core Faculty; School of Psychology at Walden University
Independent Practice; Arlington Heights, Illinois

 

When did you join Division 51? What made you interested in joining?

I joined the division in 2005, and had two major reasons for doing this.  The first is that I am passionate about helping men develop into healthy, whole persons who are able to experience and express the full range of human emotion.  I was looking for a community of practitioners and scholars who held this similar interest.  Second, I had become dissatisfied with how issues related to gender were handed in most of my graduate training.  While feminist scholarship has certainly laid a good foundation for a reconsideration of constrictive gender roles, the focus has been primarily on the experience of women.  I was introduced to the work of several of our members by one of my internship supervisors, Dr. Bob Rando at Wright State University.  I appreciated learning that it really was ok to appreciate feminism’s positive contributions while questioning how some versions of feminist thought remain insensitive to men. 

 

What do you find most valuable about being a member of the division?

I appreciate the positive relationships that continue to develop with several members of the division – members who, I want to emphasize, have a diverse set of views, interests, and ways of living in the world.  I value being able to learn from those who hold various views as this expands and challenges my thinking.  It is wonderful to be able to pose questions and requests for resources to such a talented group of men and women.  I am quite pleased that we have so many women active in the division.

 

What are your clinical, teaching, research, or other applied interests relating to the psychology of men and masculinity?

My major clinical interests are men and depression, issues with affective expression and dependency, major life and role transitions that affect identity, and what has come to be called sex addiction (though I find this label problematic, but when I use it people typically know what I mean).  I have been seeing more and more men who have struggled with malignant messages about what it means to be a man that have seriously hindered their capacity to balance family and work. 

 

What are your hopes for the division going forward?

The division owes quite a debt to feminism.  From a scholarship prospective, feminism has laid a good foundation for methods to examine, interrogate and raise awareness of constrictive gender role norms.  Practically, it seems unlikely that our bid to become a division would have succeeded without the support of Division 35.  However, we have grown in both numbers and in intellectual diversity.  I hope that there will be an increasing ability to tolerate the questioning of some tenants and positions of some feminists, which I believe is aided by presenting those questions and challenges respectfully.  Perhaps one issue is captured in the language that gets used;  I feel compelled to use a lot of qualifiers in writing this.  There are many feminisms, and not everyone who takes a challenging view is “anti-feminist.”  Nor are most feminists “anti-male.”  Similar issues can be found around the perhaps false dichotomy between essentialism and social constructivism.  When we remember this, we seem to have much more productive dialogue. 

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John Derbort, Ph.D.John Derbort, Ph.D.

 

Current title/affiliation/professional role(s):

I am a psychologist (Ph.D. in 1987 from Syracuse University).  My primary professional role is as a psychotherapist in private (solo) practice in the downtown Boston area.

 

When did you join Division 51? What made you interested in joining?

I joined Division 51 many years ago (at least the early 90's or whenever it started up). I was drawn to the division for several reasons. At the time, I was working at Boston University in the Counseling Center. I found myself seeing many men dealing with a unique set of issues around academic performance, sexuality, and relationship confusion and dissatisfaction. I began to lead men's groups and realized how common the struggles were. So my interest in men began, and the early questioning around men's roles, needs, and definitions got my attention. Of course, the other reason I was drawn to Div. 51 is because I too was/am a man. I found a professional home where my academic and clinical interests dovetailed with my own personal questions, and together were addressed and examined.

 

What do you find most valuable about being a member of the division?

What I find most enjoyable and rewarding about being a part of the Division is to be involved in a cutting edge movement to better men and the relationships men engage in. It meets my scholarly needs by pointing me towards recent research and theory, my clinical needs by informing my practice of helping men, and my personal needs to better understand myself and take responsibility for becoming a better man.

 

What are your clinical, teaching, research, or other applied interests relating to the psychology of men and masculinity?

My particular interests in men and masculinity are the role of sports in men's lives, men's relationships with men and women, and most importantly these days, fathering. And by fathering, I mean in part going through the process of redefining what it means for me to father (as in a verb) in a way that is best for my son, my wife, my community, and myself.

 

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Holly Sweet, Ph.D.Holly Sweet, Ph.D.

 

Current title/affiliation/professional role(s):

Member of Division 51, was Member-at-Large 2007-2009, in charge of list serve for Women in division 51

 

When did you join Division 51? What made you interested in joining?

I first got involved Division 51 before it was Division 51, back in the early 90s – through the efforts of Louise Silverstein who introduced me to Gary Brooks and Jim O’Neil. I started attending the annual meetings of APA after that while I was working on my doctoral dissertation at Boston College – met with Jim O’Neil to go over use of his Gender Roles instruments, was fortunate to have Jim Mahalik was on my thesis committee. I found that Division 51 was a true home for someone like me who was interested in gender issues, particularly men’s issues, which I felt wasn’t covered well by any other division. My interest in men’s issues dates back to 1975 when I read Goldberg’s book The Hazards of Being Male. I taught a class at MIT on Sex Roles and Relationships in the mid 80s, but it wasn’t until 1990 when I went to my first APA conference in Boston and took a psychology of women workshop that I began to connect with folks who helped start Division 51.

 

What do you find most valuable about being a member of the division?

  • It’s my home division at APA, it gives me a niche and an identity.
  • I really like the people in this division – they are warm and welcoming, down to earth and collaborative, great to have dinner with!
  • It has led me to connect with a group of women in the division who are wonderful and like-minded colleagues who are interested in how we, as women, can interact with men professionally as colleagues or clients in effective and respectful ways.
  • I have been mentored by people in Division 51 who have helped me professionally in many ways: finish my PhD in the areas of men’s issues, get involved in writing about men’s issues, encouraged me to propose symposia for APA, invited me to do workshops and present papers with them outside of APA, brainstormed new ways of thinking about men’s issues and how they intersect with women’s issues (i.e. the midwinter retreat). As I get older, I hope I am seen as a mentor to some of the younger Divion 51 members and can help them the way others have helped me.
  • I have been openly acknowledged and appreciated by Division 51 (i.e. spotlight on the home page, awards).
  • Last but certainly not least: I have the opportunity to be around men who are role models for me of what men can be: strong yet nurturing, sensitive but passionate, able to be emotionally expressive (especially with other men), collaborative and connected - and who also demonstrate positive relationships with women in their lives.

 

What are your clinical, teaching, research, or other applied interests relating to the psychology of men and masculinity?

  • Working with depressed men
  • How women clinicians can work more  effectively with men
  • Educating women (esp. my clients)  about men’s issues so that they can deal better with the men in their lives
  • Improving communication and understanding between men and women, especially  awareness of the sex role strain each gender faces in personal and professional settings

Is there any other question you would like to be asked,
or information you would like to share, that is relevant to the division?

I’d like to see several things happen more in our division:

  • Get more women involve
  • Get better connected with other professionals who deal with men that are not in APA (especially primary care physicians)
  • Collaborate with non-therapeutic endeavors (such as the Good Man Project) that focus on men’s issues

 

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Jack Kahn, Ph.D.Jack Kahn, Ph.D.

 

Current title/affiliation/professional role(s):

I am a professor and chair of psychology at Curry College in Milton, MA.  I also run a consultation business in the Boston area called Consonance Collaborative (www.consonancecollaborative.com). 

 

When did you join Division 51? What made you interested in joining?

I am a recently new member of the division (joined approximately two years or so ago).  I was interested in joining for two primary reasons.  First, I wanted to find a way to hear about up and coming conferences and events relating to men and masculinity.  Joining the listserv has been very helpful in this regard.  Second, I wanted to stay on top of new research being conducted in the field of psychology on men and masculinity.  I am a member of several organizations that do this kind of work from a research and activist perspective and really value the history and perspectives shared via SPSMM.

 

What do you find most valuable about being a member of the division?

I have just begun to make some contacts within the division which have been very valuable. I am hoping those connections will develop over time. Finding folks who have shared visions and concerns and value methodological and epistemological approaches to understanding and assisting men and masculinity is definitely important to my work as a psychologist. I have not yet had the opportunity to attend or present at a conference, but hope to do so in the near future. 

 

What are your clinical, teaching, research, or other applied interests relating to the psychology of men and masculinity?

Research

I am excited that this year I published my first text which is called “An Introduction to Masculinities” which has been getting some really nice reviews in the last few months.  Upon its completion, I have been working on material for my second text which includes the use of dialogical self theory to understand ways in which diverse groups of men construct alternative masculinities as a way to resist male dominance and form community spirit and pride.  Last year I focused on a group of young men of color working in a violence prevention agency and this year I am focusing on a queer theater organization.  My hope is to explore several other organizations and understand both what makes them unique and ultimately what ties them together as examples of diverse hegemonic-resistant masculinities.

 

Teaching

In my department I teach courses involving gender and counseling.  In fact, my course “Men, self, and society” was the inspiration for writing the intro to masculinities text.  I am now in the process of developing courses more closely aligned to community psychology which will encourage students to learn new content, participate in community action research, and act in ways that encourages community service, change and development.

 

Activism

In addition to my research work I also participate in activism and community work to apply the educational content to communities in which I live and work.  I am an active emember of the National organization for Men Against Sexism, Boston chapter (www.nomasboston.org) Through NOMASB my primary role has been in supporting, leading, and organizing profeminist discussion groups for male-identified people.  These groups have helped provide a place for men to challenge each other to find ways of living with others authentically and without dominance in a supportive and challenging environment.  The groups do not argue theoretical perspectives but rather focus on lived-lives and pushing one another to be better people.  NOMASB has been really wonderful and has grown a lot in the last three years.  We have also been active in supply drives, community trainings, book clubs, and other events that encourage men to work together toward the tenets of the organization which include profeminism, racial equality, lgbt justice and enhancing men’s lives.

 

Through my consultation work I hope to take useful theoretical frameworks and assist organizations in finding hands-on ways of applying the ideas.  I have done presentations to (a) mental health agencies on social class, (b) colleges on profeminist sexual harassment training (c) community centers to understand the connections between heterosexism/transphobia and racism.  I very much enjoy this work as I find ways of working with other amazing professionals in the Boston area and developing new and unique programs for specific needs of our community.

 

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Sam Cochran, Ph.D.Sam Cochran, Ph.D.

 

Current title/affiliation/professional role(s):

I am Director of the University Counseling Service and a Clinical Professor in the Counseling Psychology program at the University of Iowa.

 

When did you join Division 51? What made you interested in joining?

I joined the "Men treating Men" network that Gary Brooks and others organized through Division 29 that was one of the precursors of Divisoin 51. I joined Division 51 when it became an APA division. That was in 1997? What made you interested in joining? I have had a long-standing interest in psychotherapy with men and the psychology of men and masculinity, so it was a natural fit.

 

What do you find most valuable about being a member of the division?

The colleagueship and the journal are the two most valuable things about being a division member. I have met many men and women who share similar values about gender equality and about working to make the world a better place. The smaller size of the division makes it possible to create and sustain more personal connections around these and other shared interests. The journal is the flagship journal publishing work in this area. As an empirically minded and science oriented individual, I enjoy reading the journal and contributing as an editorial board member, and as an author when my writing 'clears the bar' and is acceptable for publication.

 

What are your clinical, teaching, research, or other applied interests relating to the psychology of men and masculinity?

Broadly, I am interested in psychotherapy with men and how to humanize the therapy process to be more inclusive of men who might otherwise avoid therapy. Helpseeking in men is a current interest. I have always been interested in understanding men's depression from both a clinical and research perspective. A newer advocacy and social justice interest of mine that fits here is work on men's violence-both against women and against other men.

 

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Bill Johnson II, Ph.D.Bill Johnson, Ph.D.

 

Current title/affiliation/professional role(s):

Dr. Bill Johnson II

Clinical Psychologist

Lecturer of Psychology

Practicum Coordinator

School of Psychology

Australian Catholic University,

Locked Bag 4115, Fitzroy, VIC 3065

Tel: 61 3 9953 3117      

Fax: 61 3 9953 3205

Registered with the VICTORIA Board of Psychologists

Member Australian Psychological Society

 

When did you join Division 51? What made you interested in joining?

My entry into the division came at a time when I was attempting to better understand diverse masculinities in general and grappling with the systemic implications of my personal socialization. In other words, I joined the division in order to understand myself better.  I also joined because I wanted to link with other men and women committed to confronting male privilege and eradicating gender based oppression. Lastly, I joined to add another voice to the experiences of men of color and other male groups who have historically been marginalized.

 

What do you find most valuable about being a member of the division?

The intimate nature of the division has enabled me to meet and forge relationships with other members of division 51. I have been blessed to interact with brilliant and personable scholars, and practitioners dedicated to promoting awareness on issues related to masculinities. It has been largely through connecting with like minded members that my understanding of what it means to be a male/man has been enhanced and my desire to positively impact the lives of other men has been solidified.

 

I have also found the journal articles published by PMM as critical to my professional/personal development. Furthermore there have been several occasions where I have used the literature published in PMM to directly inform my approach to teaching and practice. Personally, as an African American male currently living and working within Australia, reading the articles is one way which I stay connected with contemporary issues affecting men within the U.S. and across the globe.

 

Finally, it is my personal belief that connection is among the most essential ingredients of healthy living. Since joining division 51 I have felt a strong sense of connection to the members within the division, the scholastic ideas promoted by the journal and conference presentations and the administrative decisions implemented by the division’s leadership. As a result, I am proud to state that Division 51 is my home.

 

What are your clinical, teaching, research, or other applied interests relating to the psychology of men and masculinity?

 

My research and clinical interest are a combination of exploring the ways in which men are socialized and confronting those aspects of male socialization harmful to both men and women. As a result I am interested in the clinical implications of male socialization, understanding the unique socialization experiences of men of color and confronting the ways in which these individuals internalize and perpetuate male privilege. My interests also include culturally sensitive approaches to counselling men of color. In addition, I am interested in the socialization of male sexualities as well as innovative clinical approaches to the treatment of male sexual dysfunction. Finally, as a clinician I have facilitated group counselling with men of color, sex therapy groups for men and groups for male batterers.

Is there any other question you would like to be asked, or information you would like to share, that is relevant to the division?

 

I would like to make a comment about the role of mentorship in my professional development. I am increasingly recognizing how important mentorship and guidance has been on my achievements. I am grateful to those members of division 51 who have been receptive to providing me with feedback and direction over the years. I am particularly grateful to men of color such as Joe White, Thomas Parham, Miguel Gallardo, Michael Mobley, Bill Parham, Jim Dobbins and countless others who encouraged me to embrace my personal and professional strengths. There is a severe shortage of Psychologists of color generally and male psychologists of color in particular. One method of addressing this injustice is through reaching out and offering mentorship to males within higher education. Personally speaking, the mentorship I received (and continue to receive) has been instrumental in my accomplishments. I also feel indebted members such as Aaron Rochlen, Jay Wade, Andrew Smiler, and Wizdom Powell Hammond who provided mentorship through their scholastic contributions.

 

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Judith Logue, Ph.D.Judith Logue, Ph.D.

 

Current title/affiliation/professional role(s):

I am in independent practice in Princeton, NJ, and a member of the faculty, former member of the board of the Center for Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy of NJ (CPPNJ, formerly IPPNJ, Institute for P’an and P’th of NJ.

 

When did you join Division 51? What made you interested in joining?

I joined and got hooked on the interesting and thought-provoking contributions on the listserv. I was honored when asked to be a member of a Division 51 Symposium in 2006… “Symposium: Debates and Controversies in a Pro-Feminist Men’s Organization, APA, Div 51, Morial Convention Center, New Orleans, LA, August 12, 2006. Then, and at the business meeting, I met the members of the board and a number of the people who were posting on the listserv – a very warm, welcoming, and intelligent group. And that was it for me!.

 

What do you find most valuable about being a member of the division?

Learning the latest theories, research, and issues in clinical practice with men. I also learn about myself in relation to men. For me, a former radical feminist, who believed the classic paper, “the personal is political,” I believe “the personal is professional.” What I think and feel, and how I practice, has been affected by my history, psychology, and experiences.

 

What are your clinical, teaching, research, or other applied interests relating to the psychology of men and masculinity?

 

I have taught many courses to graduate and postgraduate students and candidates in my almost 50 years of clinical practice. My latest interests have been in organizational psychoanalysis and psychology. I was president of a Division 39 (Psychoanalysis) section on Women and Gender, and have done a number of presentations for them, one for Division 51 at an APA meeting, and for the American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA) and the American Association for Psychoanalysis in Clinical Social Work (AAPCSW). 

 

I just wrote a chapter for Holly Sweet, the Division 51 leader of the Women’s Division. She is editing “Gender in the Therapy Hour: Voices of Women Clinicians Working with Men. I wrote “Gender Matters – Transference, Countertransference, and Men: A Psychoanalytic Perspective.”

 

Is there any other question you would like to be asked, or information you would like to share, that is relevant to the division?

 

Because the field of psychoanalysis is (finally!) doing more and more empirical research (cf. Jonathan Shedler’s paper in the APA journal), and because we do keep our practice contemporary and modern, Division 51’s listserv is an essential way to pass on information to my colleagues, and also to keep current myself. Despite the distorted and unpopular view of psychoanalysis, which is in many undergraduate psychology textbooks (cf. research by James Hansell, PhD, at the University of Michigan), psychoanalysis today is actually incorporating the latest in neuropsychology and LGBT, as well as information and techniques from complementary medicine, CBT, and other modalities.

 

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Chris Liang, Ph.D.Judith Logue, Ph.D.

 

Current title/affiliation/professional role(s):

I am currently an Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of La Verne. At La Verne, I teach multicultural psychology and abnormal psychology to undergraduate students; research methods and multicultural counseling to MFT students, and community psychology: theory, research, and practice to PsyD students. I supervise dissertations and engage in scholarship on multicultural issues, including the intersection of racism and masculinity. Within Division 51, I am one of the out-going Member-At-Large. I am remaining involved in the Division through my role as Division Program Co-Chair for the 2011 APA Convention in Washington DC.

 

When did you join Division 51? What made you interested in joining?

I joined Division 51 in 2005 after attending the Division’s mid-year retreat. I had been interested in Men’s issues but had only learned about Division 51 after my interactions with Mark Stevens, my clinical supervisor at the University of Southern California. .

 

What do you find most valuable about being a member of the division?

The Division has been a good home to me. Through my active involvement in the Division, I have gained a deeper understanding of the research literature on men and masculinity. I have been challenged to think about masculinity more complexly. And, I think I have been able to help the Division create additional spaces for dialogue on issues of import to men of color. On a more personal note, though, I have developed deeper and more meaningful relationships with the men and women of the Division. These relationships have, in turn, challenged me to think and rethink the ways I live my life as a man.

 

What are your clinical, teaching, research, or other applied interests relating to the psychology of men and masculinity?

 

I incorporate issues of gender, race, and sexual orientation in nearly every course I teach. I stopped being apologetic about including articles on men and masculinity. Students need to understand that there is more to being a man than privilege. Incorporating the psychology of men and masculinity helps future clinicians and undergraduate students understand that the behaviors of men are sometimes influenced by the expectations that multiple cultures have of men.

 

With respect to research, I have spent most of my career focusing on issues of racism. Recently, I began to examine the intersections of race and gender. Specifically, I have studied how the experiences of perceived racism interact with masculinity ideologies to influence gender role conflict among Latino men. In an upcoming project, several colleagues will be examining the role of racism and gender role conflict on substance use, self-esteem, life satisfaction, and quality of life among Latino day laborers. My colleagues and I pretty excited about this project. Given the rise of anti-immigrant attitudes and the high profile cases of anti-Latino hate crimes, this project can help to shed light on how Latino men may experience pressures of masculinity and racism.

 

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