December 2003 | Monitor on Psychology | Vol. 34 No. 11

December 2003 Monitor cover

COVER:
Spirituality

Someone gazing

SCIENCE WATCH

Conquering fear

Kick-starting extinction through massed exposure helps mice overcome conditioned fear faster.

Head silhouette behind a line graph

FEATURES

Measuring cognitive decline

Tests that measure age-related cognitive decline may not be completely accurate, a study says.

Your car says: 'buckle up'

Psychologists inform regulators about the best way to remind drivers to use seat belts.

Psychology and the soldier

Psychologists underscored the importance of military-backed research in behavioral science.

Turning happiness into economic power

Positive psychology summit speakers discussed the benefits of a contented society.

Psychologists persevere in the states

Despite a tough financial year, state psychological associations made headway on scope of practice laws, parity and hospital privileges.

Snapshot from the therapy room

In-session strategies are not limited by overall theoretical orientation, finds PracticeNet survey.

Keeping employees healthy and happy

APA honors companies in a new national awards program designed to highlight psychologically healthy workplaces.

'Swirling' changes to the traditional student path

Universities and community colleges are sharing growing numbers of students and should collaborate more to serve them, say some.

Top-security psychology

Navy psychologist Scott Johnston monitors and treats U.S. Marines and White House staffers.

Raising the 'barre'

A ballet dancer-turned-psychologist helps performers reach career heights.

'Enlarging the vision' of Developmental Psychology

New editor García Coll will emphasize cross-disciplinary dialogue and added focus on debates and new trends.

Rayner takes the reins of Psychological Review

The journal's new editor aims to build on its stellar reputation.

Nation's Capital in DC at night

PUBLIC POLICY UPDATE

'Capitolizing' on member advocacy efforts

APA thanks those who advocated for psychology on Capitol Hill this year.

CORRECTIONS