January 2007 | Monitor on Psychology | Vol. 38 No. 1

January 2007 Monitor cover

COVER:
Psychocardiology

Newspaper business section

SCIENCE WATCH

Taking stock of your stock

Research suggests that people often make unwise retirement investment decisions. What's worse? They don't learn from their mistakes.

Web browser on a computer screen

ETHICS ROUNDS

Posting on the Internet: An opportunity for self (and other) reflection

The Internet offers unique opportunities to present ourselves and our views. The breadth of exposure counsels thoughtfulness for the potential impact of disclosures on our professional work.

Hands in a huddle

FEATURES

Team science

At a recent conference, researchers gathered to discuss how to encourage and evaluate transdisciplinary teams.

Phantom pain and the brain

An actual touch, or an imaginary one? It's all the same to (some parts of) your brain.

Public health, prescriptive authority and parity

In 2006, psychologists advocated in state legislatures for consumers' rights and professional autonomy.

Beyond deinstutionalization: reintegration

Psychologist Robert Bernstein describes how the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law works for connected, purposeful community living for people with serious mental illness.

A new tool for psychotherapists

Five psychoanalytic associations collaborate to publish a new diagnostic manual.

New president looks ahead

APA's new president focuses on her initiatives and the 2007 convention in San Francisco.

Opening up the bottleneck

PsyD programs look to create internships that help underserved clients.

Supplying therapy where it’s needed most

A Philadelphia-based program matches psychology interns and students with primary-care physicians.

Method man

New journal editor Scott Maxwell wants methodological advances to be accessible to all psychologists.

Pioneers of integrated health care

Winners of the 2007 APF Cummings PSYCHE Prize work to integrate psychologists into primary care.

Boy and baby noses touching

PUBLIC POLICY UPDATE

The psychological needs of military personnel and families

The Defense Graduate Psychology Education program trains psychologists to help troops and their families.

COLUMNS

From the CEO

Judicial Notebook

President's Column

Professional Point

Speaking of Education

DEPARTMENTS

Letters

People