In the news

A summary of recent stories in the APA Monitor, press releases and blogs.
  • Speaking up against ageism by Gwendolyn Keita, PhD, APA executive director for the Public Interest Directorate, discusses how age is a critical aspect of diversity that should inform psychologists’ work as researchers, practitioners and educators. Yet age and the intersection of age with other forms of diversity often do not come to mind when issues such as cultural competence, health disparities, human rights, and discrimination and prejudice are discussed. Monitor on Psychology®, Volume 45, No. 5, May 2014.

  • Alzheimer’s disease may cause six times as many deaths as official statistics indicate according to research conducted at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. Monitor on Psychology, “In Brief,” Volume 45, No. 5, May 2014.

  • Cognitive training slows cognitive decline reports a trial funded by the National Institutes of Health. It found that the benefits of cognitive training for older adults can last as long as 10 years. Monitor on Psychology, “In Brief,” Volume 45, No. 3, March 2014.

  • Living with — not dying from — Alzheimer’s discusses life with Alzheimer’s disease with former APA president Sharon Stephens Brehm, PhD. The article highlights her efforts in moving from devastation upon receiving her 2011 diagnosis to speaking out as a way of educating the public that you can still have a good life with Alzheimer's. Monitor on Psychology, Volume 45, No. 1, January 2014. [Editor’s Note: In the preface of her 2007 Presidential Task Force report, Blueprint for Change: Achieving Integrated Health Care for an Aging Population, Brehm stated that the single-most important factor that led to the report’s development was her mother's diagnosis of Alzheimer’s in 1978 — specifically the mix of depression and Alzheimer's — and the poorly coordinated care she received from her physicians. It was Brehm’s belief that the report would “make a significant contribution to helping our country (and perhaps other countries as well) respond more wisely, effectively, and compassionately to what is clearly a major healthcare crisis.”] Monitor on Psychology, Volume 45, No. 1, January 2014.

  • Retiring minds want to know the key to a smooth retirement… Tend to your psychological portfolio as much as your financial one, researchers say. Monitor on Psychology, “In Brief,” Volume 45, No. 1, January 2014.

  • Speaking a second language may delay the onset of dementia finds research conducted at Nizam's Institute of Medical Sciences in India. The researchers found that people who spoke two languages developed dementia an average of 4.5 years later than those who spoke only one language. Monitor on Psychology, “In Brief,” Volume 45, No. 1, January 2014.

  • Learning a new skill may beat puzzles for boosting older adults' memory finds a study led by a University of Texas at Dallas psychologist. Monitor on Psychology, “In Brief,” Volume 45, No. 1, January 2014.

  • A good night's rest may clean up the brain suggests a University of Rochester-led study. Monitor on Psychology, “In Brief,” Volume 45, No. 1, January 2014.

  • Stepfamilies add to a caregiver's burden according to a University of Michigan study of women who remarried late in life and who eventually became the primary caregivers for a husband with dementia. Monitor on Psychology, “In Brief,” Volume 44, No. 11, December 2013.

  • Personality is a key factor in health-care use according to a study led by University of Rochester scientists. People who scored high in neuroticism were 24 percent more likely to visit the emergency room and more than twice as likely to spend time in a nursing home for long-term care as individuals low in neuroticism. Monitor on Psychology, “In Brief,” Volume 44, No. 11, December 2013.