Ethnicity and Health in America Series

This year, the series is raising awareness about the physiological and psychological impact of stress as it relates to health.

In honor of Black History Month, the Ethnicity and Health in America Series is raising awareness about the physiological and psychological impact of stress as it relates to racism and discrimination. A two part session focused on the impact of racism, discrimination and microaggressions on stress and health among African-Americans entitled Race Related Stress Among African-Americans: How to identify and cope with daily microaggression will be held at George Washington University in Phillips Hall B156 on Monday, Feb. 25, 2013, from 5:30-8:00 pm.

Part I of the session is a forum, which includes presentations on the experience of racism, discrimination and microaggressions among African-Americans and the impact of these experiences on stress and health, followed by an open discussion of these issues among presenters and audience members. Part II of the session includes an interactive demonstration of creative stress reducing techniques and coping strategies led by Aniekan Udofia, a visual artists who achieved local notoriety for his towering murals of Duke Ellington, Fredrick Douglas and George Washington. In addition to Udofia, the panel of presenters and participants will include Sherry Molock, PhD, professor of psychology at George Washington University; and Debra Roberts, associate professor of psychology at Howard University; GiShawn Mance, PhD, assistant professor of Psychology at American University; Alfiee Breland-Noble, PhD, assistant professor of Psychiatry at Georgetown University; Marie C. Jipguep-Akhtar, PhD, associate professor of sociology at Howard University; and Antwan Jones, PhD, assistant professor of sociology at George Washington University.

If you are interested in working on the Ethnicity and Health in American Series with OEMA, please contact the office via email.