Message from the Guest Editor

These articles were selected for the Indicator because they all address the topic of SES in higher education from varying perspectives and focus on different problems.

By Bettina Spencer

Choosing a special topic to focus on for the Current Issue Home of the SES Indicator was both difficult and obvious. It was difficult since there are so many issues related to SES that need to be discussed. SES in psychology is often overlooked and has yet to be fully embraced as a matter of concern and interest by the larger psychology community. The choice was also obvious since my own personal and academic interests focus on SES in higher education. Moving from a working-class/working-poor background in to college was a culture shock and I still feel the reverberations. As a professor, my own low-SES background informs my teaching, my research, and my mentoring.

I selected these articles for the Indicator because they all address the topic of SES in higher education from varying perspectives and focus on different problems. The article topics range from the “academic divide” in college admissions, low-SES students’ adjustment to college, the cultural divide between low-SES students and their professors, the barriers that low-SES students face and how such SES barriers intersect with race and ethnicity.

While these topics by no means address all of the problems, struggles, and issues of SES in higher education, they do begin to chip away at some of the stigma associated with talking about SES and low-SES students. The more we discuss, analyze, and critique issues of SES in higher education, the more we can connect to low-SES students who may be concealing their social class stigma, the more we can educate our fellow educators, and the more we can shed light on the topic of SES in the field of psychology as a whole.

In solidarity,

Bettina Spencer