National Economic Council’s report, Jobs and Economic Security for America’s Women

On October 22, 2010, Kari Hill, Women’s Programs Assistant, sat in on a Women and the Economy White House conference call highlighting the National Economic Council’s (NEC) report, Jobs and Economic Security for America’s Women

Tina Tchen, Executive Director of the White House Council on Women and Girls and Director of the White House Office of Public Engagement, led the conversation. Joining her were Valerie Jarrett, Chair of the White House Council on Women and Girls and Senior Adviser and Assistant to the President for Intergovernmental Affairs and Public Engagement; Cecilia Rouse, member of the Council of Economic Advisers; and Diana Farrell, Deputy Director of the National Economic Council.

The group discussed caveats of information from the report, such as: 

  • 57% of undergraduate students, 60% of graduate school students, and 50.4% of PhD candidates are women; 

  • 51.4% of all managers are women; 30% of all American small businesses are owned by women; and 

  • In almost two-thirds of families led by single mothers or two parents, women are either the primary or co-breadwinner (United States Economic Council, 2010).

In addition to the challenges cutting across America’s female workforce: 

  • The gender wage gap has narrowed since the Equal Pay Act was written into law, but has not disappeared and remained flat over the last decade. Women are paid an average of seventy-seven cents for every dollar paid to men; 

  • Women remain underrepresented in high levels of management and high paying salaries; only 2.6% of Fortune 500 companies are led by a female CEO, additionally, only 15.2% of those companies’ board seats are occupied by women; and only 1 in 14 women earn over $100,000 compared with 1 in 7 men; and 

  • Certain groups of women face additional challenges. African American women are nearly twice as likely to be unemployed as White women; Hispanic women are 50% more likely than White women to be unemployed; older single women face higher rates of poverty than older married women; and unemployment among single mothers is higher than that of married women. (United States National Economic Council, 2010).

The report (PDF, 1.02 MB) lays out the economic landscape facing women today.

United States National Economic Council. (2010). Jobs and Economic Security for America’s Women (PDF, 1.02 MB).