Senior Director of Women’s Programs attends 55th Session of the UN Commission on the Status of Women

Eliminating all barriers to women’s and girls’ access and full participation in every aspect of science and technology will further the potential of each country to meet its international commitments to women’s rights
Science and technology are increasingly major contributing elements for the achievement of development goals: eradicating poverty, fighting disease, improving education, achieving food security, and addressing environmental problems. Since 1997, the CSW has included access to and participating in science and technology and access to decent work as cross-cutting concerns in its deliberations and outcomes.  Factors limiting women’s access and use of technology may vary greatly from country to country: lack of education and training, lack of financial resources, unequal burden of care giving, and gender bias of many kinds. Science and technology skills can offer opportunities for a broad range of well-paid employment, but gender stereotyping and discriminatory practices have resulted in women being grossly underrepresented in these fields, although lack of adequate gender data, particularly around issues of employment in science and research, hamper efforts both to evaluate the causes of the problem and to measure progress. Eliminating all barriers to women’s and girls’ access and full participation in every aspect of science and technology will further the potential of each country to meet its international commitments to women’s rights as well as achieve its development goals. Dr. Shari Miles-Cohen, Senior Director, Women’s Programs Office, attended the 55th annual United Nations Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) meetings.