The Causes of Rape: Understanding Individual Differences in Male Propensity for Sexual Aggression

Pages: 294
Item #: 4316047
ISBN: 978-1-59147-186-8
List Price: $19.95
Member/Affiliate Price: $19.95
Copyright: 2005
Format: Hardcover
Availability: In Stock
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For individuals in the U.S. & U.S. territories

Overview

The Causes of Rape: Understanding Individual Differences in Male Propensity for Sexual Aggression examines why some men are prone to rape, offers probable causes for this inclination, and provides a comprehensive review of scientific studies of coercive sex.

The authors look at evidence from studies in developmental criminology, evolutionary psychology, psychopathology, and psychophysiology and examine the situational and social factors that influence the likelihood of rape. Theories about rape have an unfortunate history of being unconstrained by empirical knowledge, sometimes with the harmful consequence that solutions to the problem of rape are ineffectual. The authors address this situation with a fact-based exploration of this phenomenon, beginning with a review of coercive sex among animal species and an account of rape throughout history and across culture, moving through a discussion of current research on rape, and culminating with a synthesis of research findings that points toward a new explanation of why some men rape. The authors also discuss the practical implications of their research on the assessment and treatment of men who rape.

This empirically exhaustive book will be the new standard text on the phenomenon of rape and will help psychologists, social workers, and legal professionals to develop a better understanding of sexual aggression.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

  1. Introduction

I. General Background

  1. Rape Across Cultures and Time
  2. Forced Copulation in the Animal Kingdom

II. Identifying and Making Sense of Individual Differences

  1. Antisociality and Mating Effort
  2. Sexual Interest in Rape
  3. Psychopathology
  4. Contextual and Situational Factors

III. Implications

  1. Clinical Assessment and Treatment of Rapists
  2. Synthesis and Implications for Treatment

Appendix: Forced Copulation

References

Author Index

Subject Index

About the Authors

Author Bios

Martin L. Lalumière, PhD, was a research psychologist at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and associate professor of psychiatry and criminology at the University of Toronto during the preparation of this book. He is now associate professor in the department of psychology and neuroscience at the University of Lethbridge. His research interests include the etiology of sexual aggression, the development of sexual preferences, the physiological assessment of sexual arousal, the nature of psychopathy, and the link between early neurodevelopmental perturbations and men's propensity for violence. He received the Governor General's Academic Gold Medal for his graduate work at Queen's University. He is on the editorial board of the journals Archives of Sexual Behavior and Sexual Abuse. Some of his recent work was published in Evolution and Human Behavior, Journal of Abnormal Psychology, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London: Biological Sciences, and Psychological Bulletin.

Grant T. Harris, PhD, is the director of research at the Mental Health Centre, Ontario, Canada. He is also an associate professor of psychology at Queen's University in Kingston, and associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Toronto. He is a fellow of the Canadian Psychological Association and was awarded the Amethyst Award for Outstanding Achievement by an Ontario Public Servant. He has been awarded several research grants on the topics of actuarial violence risk assessment, sexual aggression, the nature of psychopathy, and the assessment and treatment of violent offenders. This research has resulted in more than 100 publications on forensic topics.

Vernon L. Quinsey, PhD, is professor of psychology, biology, and psychiatry at Queen's University in Kingston. He is a fellow of the Canadian Psychological Association and has served on the editorial boards of a variety of journals. He has chaired research review panels of the American National Institute of Mental Health and the Ontario Mental Health Foundation. He was awarded the Significant Achievement Award of the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers in 1994 and was the recipient of a Senior Research Fellowship from the Ontario Mental Health Foundation. He has authored or coauthored more than 100 publications on forensic topics, including eight books.

Marnie E. Rice, PhD, is the scientific director of the Centre for the Study of Aggression and Mental Disorder and is the former director of the Research Department of the Mental Health Centre, Penetanguishene, Ontario, Canada, where she continues her research parttime. She is also part-time professor of psychiatry and behavioral neurosciences at McMaster University, adjunct professor of psychiatry at the University of Toronto, and adjunct associate professor of psychology at Queen's University. She was the 1995 recipient of the American Psychological Association's award for Distinguished Contribution to Research in Public Policy, was the 1997 recipient of a government of Ontario Amethyst Award for outstanding contribution by an Ontario public servant, and was recently elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in recognition of her scholarly contributions.