Handbook of Clinical Hypnosis

Pages: 765
Item #: 4317151
ISBN: 978-1-55798-440-1
List Price: $39.95
Member/Affiliate Price: $29.95
Copyright: 1993
Format: Softcover
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Overview

Once relegated to the realm of the supernatural, hypnosis has increasingly moved into mainstream psychology. On the basis of several decades of theory, research, and clinical practice, hypnotherapy is now considered a legitimate intervention methodology for the treatment of psychological and medical disorders in a variety of clinical contexts.

The editors of Handbook of Clinical Hypnosis have called upon leading clinical theoreticians, practitioners, and researchers to contribute state-of-the-art, integrative summaries of hypnotherapeutic approaches. The Handbook surveys the wide range of orientations and applications of hypnotherapy: from models, techniques, and procedures to clinical and research applications in behavioral medicine, sports and forensic psychology, and the treatment of psychological disorders such as anxiety, stress, trauma, and multiple personality.

This softcover edition is a re-release of the 1993 hardcover edition.

Table of Contents

List of Contributors

Foreword

Preface

Acknowledgments

I. Foundations and General Considerations

  1. Introduction to Clinical Hypnosis
    —Irving Kirsch, Steven Jay Lynn, and Judith W. Rhue
  2. Individual Differences in Response to Hypnosis
    —Brad L. Bates
  3. Operator Variables in Hypnotherapy
    —Billie S. Strauss
  4. Expectations and Hypnotherapy
    —William C. Coe
  5. Prevention and Therapeutic Management of "Negative Effects" in Hypnotherapy
    —David C. Frauman, Steven Jay Lynn, and John P. Brentar

II. Models of Hypnotherapy

  1. Psychoanalytic and Psychodynamic Models of Hypnoanalysis
    —Marlene R. Eisen
  2. Cognitive–Behavioral Hypnotherapy
    —Irving Kirsch
  3. Rational–Emotive Therapy and Hypnosis
    —Albert Ellis
  4. An Ericksonian Model of Hypnotherapy
    —William J. Matthews, Stephen Lankton, and Carol Lankton
  5. Cognitive–Developmental Hypnotherapy
    —E. Thomas Dowd

III. Hypnotic Techniques

  1. Enhancing Hypnotizability and Treatment Responsiveness
    —Jeffrey D. Gfeller
  2. Clinical Self-Hypnosis: Transformation and Subjectivity
    —Shirley Sanders
  3. Active–Alert Hypnosis in Psychotherapy
    —Éva I. Bányai, Annamária Zseni, and Ferenc Túry
  4. Hypnosis and Metaphor
    —Peter Brown

IV. Treating Psychological Disorders

  1. Phobias and Intense Fears: Facilitating Their Treatment With Hypnosis
    —Helen J. Crawford and Arreed F. Barabasz
  2. Hypnosis and Depression
    —Michael D. Yapko
  3. Hypnotherapy With Children
    —Daniel P. Kohen and Karen Olness
  4. Hypnosis in the Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa
    —Michael R. Nash and Elgan L. Baker
  5. Hypnosis in the Treatment of Multiple Personality Disorder
    —Richard Horevitz
  6. The Borderline Patient and the Psychotic Patient
    —Joan Murray-Jobsis

V. Coping With Stress and Trauma

  1. Hypnosis and Storytelling in the Treatment of Child Sexual Abuse: Strategies and Procedures
    —Judith W. Rhue and Steven Jay Lynn
  2. Hypnotherapy With Rape Victims
    —William H. Smith
  3. Hypnosis in the Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorders
    —David Spiegel

VI. Behavioral Medicine and Sports Psychology

  1. Hypnosis in Pain Management
    —John F. Chaves
  2. Hypnosis in the Treatment of Obesity
    —Eugene E. Levitt
  3. Hypnosis and Smoking Cessation: A Cognitive–Behavioral Treatment
    —Steven Jay Lynn, Victor Neufeld, Judith W. Rhue, and Abigail Matorin
  4. Assessment and Treatment of Somatization Disorders: The High Risk Model of Threat Perception
    —Ian Wickramasekera
  5. Psychological Treatment of Warts
    —Susan C. DuBreuil and Nicholas P. Spanos
  6. Hypnosis and Sport Psychology
    —William P. Morgan

VII. Issues and Extensions

  1. Training Issues in Hypnosis
    —Peter B. Bloom
  2. Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Hypnotic-Like Procedures Used by Native Healing Practitioners
    —Stanley Krippner
  3. Forensic Hypnosis: The Application of Ethical Guidelines
    —Peter W. Sheehan and Kevin M. McConkey

Index

About the Editors

Editor Bios

Judith W. Rhue is a professor of family medicine at the Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine and has a private practice. She is a member of APA's Division of Psychological Hypnosis, of which she is a fellow.

She has received awards for excellence in research from both organizations, as well as an award for the best hypnosis book published during 1991 (Theories of Hypnosis: Current Models and Perspectives), bestowed by the Society for Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis.

Dr. Rhue serves on the editorial boards of the International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis and Contemporary Hypnosis. She is coeditor of two hypnosis books and a forthcoming book on dissociation (with Steven Jay Lynn), and she has written numerous articles and book chapters on hypnosis, fantasy, and child abuse.

Steven Jay Lynn is a professor of psychology at Ohio University and has a private practice. He is a former president of APA's Division of Psychological Hypnosis; a fellow in the APA, American Psychological Society, and Society for Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis; and a diplomate of the American Board of Psychological Hypnosis.

He has received two awards from the Society for Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis for research excellence and for the best hypnosis book published during 1991 (Theories of Hypnosis: Current Models and Perspectives).

An advisory editor of the Journal of Abnormal Psychology, the International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, and Psychological Hypnosis, and a North American editor of Contemporary Hypnosis, Dr. Lynn has written or edited textbooks on abnormal psychology, psychotherapy, and dissociation and has published more than 100 articles on hypnosis, child abuse, fantasy, psychotherapy, and behavioral medicine.

Irving Kirsch is a professor of psychology at the University of Connecticut. He is the North American editor of Contemporary Hypnosis and a member of the editorial board of the International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis.

Dr. Kirsch is a fellow of APA and the Society for Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis. In 1993, he served as president of APA's Division of Psychological Hypnosis.

His book Changing Expectations: A Key to Effective Psychotherapy was published in 1990. He has published more than 75 journal articles and book chapters on hypnosis, behavior therapy, anxiety disorders, depression, and expectancy effects, and has presented papers on these topics internationally.

Reviews & Awards
This handbook surveys modern clinical hypnosis in an encyclopedic manner and should be on the must read list of all psychotherapists.
—Psychotherapy Book News: A Journal of Essays and Reviews, Vol 33, May 13, 1999