The Heart and Soul of Change: What Works in Therapy

Pages: 462
Item #: 431723A
ISBN: 978-1-55798-557-6
List Price: $39.95
Member/Affiliate Price: $34.95
Copyright: 1999
Format: Hardcover
FREE Shipping

For individuals in the U.S. & U.S. territories

Note: This book is out of print and no longer available for purchase.
Overview

This book is out of print. However, a second edition is available.

At the root of many controversies surrounding therapy is one key question: What works? Is efficacy based on the singular curative powers of specialized techniques, or do other variables account for patient change? This book proposes the answer, which is not to be found in the languages, theories, or procedural differences of the field's warring camps. Instead, the answer lies in pantheoretical, or common factors-the ingredients of effective therapy shared by all orientations. More than 40 years of outcome research is pointing the way to what really matters in the therapist's day-to-day work.

The editors have assembled some of the best researchers and practitioners in the field today to analyze the extensive literature on common factors and to offer their own evaluations of what those data mean for therapy and therapists. Consistent patterns are revealed in findings from multiple perspectives—clinical, research, quantitative and qualitative, individual and family, and medical and school. The result is a book that provocatively interprets in a scholarly yet accessible manner the empirical foundation of how people change. Clinicians will especially appreciate the wealth of practical suggestions for using the common factors to improve their daily practice.

Table of Contents

List of Contributors

Foreword
—John Norcross

Preface

  1. Introduction
    —Mark A. Hubble, Barry L. Duncan, and Scott D. Miller

I. Empirical Foundation

  1. The Empirical Case for the Common Factors in Therapy: Quantitative Findings
    —Ted P. Asay and Michael J. Lambert
  2. Qualitative Inquiry in Psychotherapy: Research on the Common Factors
    —Paul V. Maione and Ronald J. Chenail

II. The Common Factors: Extra-Therapeutic Change, the Therapeutic Relationship, Expectancy, and Therapeutic Technique

  1. The Client as a Common Factor: Clients as Self-Healers
    —Karen Tallman and Arthur C. Bohart
  2. The Therapeutic Relationship
    —Alexandra Bachelor and Adam Horvath
  3. Hope as a Psychotherapeutic Foundation of Common Factors, Placebos, and Expectancies
    —C. R. Snyder, Scott T. Michael, and Jennifer S. Cheavens
  4. The Contribution of Models and Techniques to Therapeutic Efficacy: Contradictions Between Professional Trends and Clinical Research
    —Benjamin M. Ogles, Timothy Anderson, and Kirk M. Lunnen
  5. How Do People Change, and How Can We Change to Help Many More People?
    —James O. Prochaska

III. Special Applications of the Common Factors

  1. From Placebo to Alliance: The Role of Common Factors in Medicine
    —Albert W. Scovern
  2. Common Psychosocial Factors in Psychiatric Drug Therapy
    —Roger P. Greenberg
  3. Common Factors and Other Nontechnique Variables in Marriage and Family Therapy
    —Douglas H. Sprenkle, Adrian J. Blow, and Mitchell H. Dickey
  4. Common Factors of School-Based Change
    —John J. Murphy

IV. Implications of the Common Factors for Reimbursement Policy and Practice

  1. What Really Makes a Difference in Psychotherapy Outcome? Why Does Managed Care Want to Know?
    —Jeb Brown, Sandra Dreis, and David K. Nace
  2. Directing Attention to What Works
    —Mark A. Hubble, Barry L. Duncan, and Scott D. Miller

Index

About the Editors

Reviews & Awards

Winner of the Menninger's 15th Annual Alumni Writing Awards Competition in the scientific books category!

Let's confront the unpleasant reality and say it out loud: The rivalrous warfare among theoretical orientations in psychotherapy has impeded scientific advances and hindered the development of effective treatments. In the dogma-eat-dogma environment of schoolism, clinicians traditionally operated from within their own particular theoretical frameworks, often to the point of being oblivious to alternative conceptualizations and potentially superior interventions. Although this ideological cold war may have been a necessary developmental stage, its day has come and passed. The ear of rapprochement is upon us…Hubble, Duncan, and Miller manifest considerable courage and admirable foresight in compiling this superb volume, aptly titles The Heart and Soul of Change, that summarizes what the evidence tells us actually works in psychotherapy, as opposed to what theorists posit should work. They expertly summarize and concretize the role of the common factors across the helping professions. The 14 chapters of this book convincingly demonstrate how these commonalties powerfully operate in any behavioral change enterprise, including individual therapy, medicine, pharmacotherapy, family therapy, and in the schools…The Heart and Soul of Change transcends the therapy wars and advances a mature peace in which effective psychotherapy and suffering clients are the victors.
—John C. Norcross

Every year I read numerous books. Only a few alter my thought and make a lasting impact. This one is my nominee for book of the year. It dispatched mechanistic reductionism, drug metaphors for therapy evaluation, and prescriptive matching of diagnosis (DSM-IV) with empirically validated techniques. The elucidation of a common factors model with the client as agent and their one-dimensional technologies. Mental health training programs will inevitably make this volume required reading.
—Allen E. Bergin, PhD, Department of Psychology and Clinical Psychology, Brigham Young University

Like a juggernaut, this volume demolishes the belief that therapy models matter most and then skillfully rebuilds a solid case for what makes for effective therapy.
—William J. Doherty, PhD, Professor and Director of the Marriage and Family Therapy Program, University of Minnesota

A truly excellent and exciting volume, developing the common factors argument better that I've seen done before. The editors and contributors have done a great job.
—David A. Shapiro, PhD, University of Leeds

The editors have assembled some of the best researchers and practitioners in the field today to analyze the extensive literature on common factors and to offer their own evaluations of what those data mean for therapy, therapists, and consumers. Consistent patterns are revealed in findings from multiple perspectives…The result is a book that provocatively interprets in a scholarly yet accessible manner the empirical foundation of how people change. Clinicians will especially appreciate the wealth of practical suggestions for using the common factors to improve their daily practice.
—Adolescence, Vol 34, No 136, Winter 1999

In light of their study of the clinical and research literature, the editors found that the effectiveness of therapy depended not on a particular therapeutic approach on four factors common to all therapies…In this volume, they have brought together distinguished contributors to explore the implications of this finding.
—Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic, Vol 63, No 4, (Fall 1999)