Acute Stress Disorder: A Handbook of Theory, Assessment, and Treatment

Pages: 251
Item #: 431737A
ISBN: 978-1-55798-612-2
List Price: $39.95
Member/Affiliate Price: $29.95
Copyright: 2000
Format: Hardcover
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Note: This book is out of print and no longer available for purchase.
Overview

Accidents and disasters dominate headlines and news programs, capturing for a while the attention and sympathy of the public. But for the victims and witnesses of trauma, the psychological effects are far from fleeting. Recent research shows that the psychological reactions in the initial aftermath of the trauma are a critical predictor of longer-term adjustment.

Acute Stress Disorder: A Handbook of Theory, Assessment, and Treatment is the first comprehensive clinical text on Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) since its 1994 introduction into DSM-IV as a diagnostic category. Authors Richard A. Bryant and Allison G. Harvey outline the rationale and techniques to prevent the development of PTSD by identifying and treating those with ASD. Drawing from their pioneering clinical and research experience, they review the underlying theoretical issues, then present a step-by-step guide to assessing and treating ASD, and detail the procedures for using cognitive behavior therapy to treat ASD. The authoritative book is a must-read for academic and clinical psychologists, psychiatrists, and other mental health professionals working with victims of trauma.

Table of Contents

Preface

Acknowledgments

I. Theoretical and Empirical Issues

  1. The Emergence of Acute Stress Disorder
  2. Theoretical Perspectives of Acute Stress Disorder
  3. Empirical Status of Acute Stress Disorder

II. Assessment

  1. How to Diagnose Acute Stress Disorder
  2. Assessment Tools

III. Treatment

  1. Empirical Basis for Treatment
  2. Treating Acute Stress Disorder
  3. Treatment Obstacles

IV. Special Considerations

  1. Special Populations
  2. The Role of Debriefing
  3. Legal Issues

Appendix A: Acute Stress Disorder Interview

Appendix B: Acute Stress Disorder Scale

References

Author Index

Subject Index

About the Authors

Author Bios

Richard A. Bryant, PhD, is associate professor of psychology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. He is director of the Clinical Psychology Program at the university. He is also director of the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) unit at Westmead Hospital in Sydney. He has published over 80 peer-reviewed journal articles on trauma, dissociation, and hypnosis. He has received multiple research grants, including grants from the National Health Medical Research Council and Australian Research Council. He has received numerous awards, including the Australian Psychological Society's (APS's) 1996 Early Career Award and the APS Ian Campbell Award for Clinical Psychology Excellence. He has served as a consultant to many disaster agencies, including government agencies controlling bushfires, criminal assault, naval disasters, and transport disasters. He has conducted pioneering research in acute stress disorder and developed the initial assessment and treatment.

Allison G. Harvey, PhD, is a university lecturer in the department of experimental psychology, University of Oxford, United Kingdom and a fellow of St. Anne's College. Her doctorate, completed in 1997 at the University of New South Wales, Australia, involved an extensive analysis of acute stress disorder. In addition, she has collaborated with Dr. Bryant in the development of assessment and treatment protocols for victims of trauma. Her research interests include acute stress disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and sleep disorders, particularly insomnia. She has over 30 published articles in peer reviewed journals. Awards for her research achievements include the Sir Robert Menzies Memorial Research Scholarship in 1995, the Queens Trust Award for Young Australians in 1997, and the Chaim Danielle Early Career Award, presented in 1998 by the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies for outstanding and fundamental contributions to the field of traumatic stress.