Adaptation to Chronic Childhood Illness

Pages: 382
Item #: 4317601
ISBN: 978-1-55798-619-1
List Price: $19.95
Member/Affiliate Price: $19.95
Copyright: 1996
Format: Softcover
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Note: This book is out of print and no longer available for purchase.
Overview

In the United States, the lives of more than 10 million children are affected by chronic illnesses. In this book, the authors introduce a multidimensional framework for examining the development and adaptation of children with chronic illness. This framework encompasses biomedical, psychological, and social-ecological factors to be considered in developing intervention efforts to enhance adaptation in this population. Specific chronic illnesses discussed are asthma, cancer, cystic fibrosis, diabetes, sickle-cell disease, and spina bifida.

Adaptation to Chronic Childhood Illness is divided into four sections that cover the impact of chronic childhood illness, developmental changes, enhancement of adaptation, and goals for public policy and research. This book is intended as more than a reference tool for those studying the process of adaptation; it can serve to influence the formulation of research questions, intervention programs, and public policy—and possibly, even motivate some to become involved professionally in helping to meet the needs of and improve the quality of life for this population.

This softcover edition is a re-release of the 1995 hardcover edition.

Table of Contents

Preface

Introduction and Overview

  1. Impact of Chronic Childhood Illness
  2. Developmental Changes
  3. Enhancing Adaptation
  4. Goals for Public Policy and Research

I. Impact of Chronic Childhood Illness

Section Introduction

  1. Epidemiology and Classification
  2. Psychological Adjustment
  3. Correlates of Psychological Adjustment
  4. Social Adjustment, Peer Relationships, and School Performance
  5. Models of Adaptation
  6. Psychological Adjustment of Parents and Siblings

II. Developmental Changes

Section Introduction

  1. Developmental Changes in Conceptualizations of Health, Illness, Pain, and Death
  2. Developmental Changes in Cognitive Processes
  3. Developmental Changes in Coping

III. Enhancing Adaptation

Section Introduction

  1. Intervention Goals and Processes
  2. Adherence
  3. Pain Management

IV. Goals for Public Policy and Research

Section Introduction

  1. Policy Implications
  2. Conclusion and Future Research Goals

References

Author Index

Subject Index

About the Authors

Editor Bios

Robert J. Thompson, Jr., is Professor and Head of the Division of Medical Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Professor of Psychology in the Department of Psychology: Social and Health Sciences at Duke University. Thompson is a Fellow of the Division of Clinical Psychology of the American Psychological Association and a Fellow of the International Academy for Research and Learning Disabilities. He holds the Diplomate in Clinical Psychology of the American Board of Professional Psychology. He has served on the editorial board of the Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics and the Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings and serves as a consulting editor for the Journal of Pediatric Psychology. Thompson received the Distinguished Researchers Award (1993) of the Association of Medical School Professors of Psychology and the Distinguished Teacher Award (1985–1986) from the Division of Medical Psychology at Duke University. With Aglaia O'Quinn, he wrote Developmental Disabilities: Etiologies, Manifestations, Diagnoses, and Treatments (1979). He also was the author of the monograph Behavior Problems in Children with Developmental and Learning Disabilities (1986) and was one of the authors of Introduction to Behavioral Science and Medicine (1983). In addition, he has written numerous journal articles and book chapters about how biological and psychosocial processes act together in the development and adjustment of children with developmental and medical problems.

Kathryn E. Gustafson is Assistant Professor of Medical Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Assistant Professor of Psychology in the Department of Psychology: Social and Health Sciences at Duke University. She received her PhD in clinical psychology from Ohio University and completed a clinical child/pediatric internship at the Medical University of South Carolina. Subsequently, she completed a pediatric psychology fellowship at Duke University Medical Center. Her research and clinical interests are in the areas of child and family adaptation to chronic childhood illness, and ethical issues in clinical psychology. She has been a co-investigator and coordinator of federally funded clinical research grants with infants of very low birth weight and with children with cystic fibrosis and sickle-cell disease. Gustafson has also been the coordinator of the Pediatric Psychology Laboratory and Consultation Service at Duke University Medical Center. A particular area of clinical focus has been children with brain tumors, and Gustafson serves as the psychologist on the multidisciplinary Pediatric Neuro-Oncology team at Duke. Gustafson has also served on the editorial board of the Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. She has authored or coauthored articles that have appeared in journals such as Journal of Pediatric Psychology, Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, and Professional Psychology: Research and Practice.

Reviews & Awards
Adaptation to Chronic Childhood Illness is a comprehensive text dealing with a growing issue in the field of Disability Studies…By dividing the book into four distinct sections, Thompson and Gustafson effectively deal with the impact of chronic childhood illness, the developmental changes that accompany illness, the enhancement of adaptation, and goals for public policy…This text is a wonderful guide for those interested in chronic childhood illness/disability. It examines the subject from a practical combination of biomedical, socio-economic, and psychological viewpoints.
Disability Studies Quarterly, Spring 1999, Vol. 19, No. 2, p. 132