Self-Criticism and Self-Enhancement: Theory, Research, and Clinical Implications

Pages: 291
Item #: 4318043
ISBN: 978-1-4338-0115-0
List Price: $29.95
Member/Affiliate Price: $24.95
Copyright: 2008
Format: Hardcover
Availability: In Stock
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Overview

In recent years we have witnessed a proliferation of writing on "positive psychology" that focuses on variables such as optimism, personal control, self-esteem, and personal striving. At the same time, much of recent pop psychology has emphasized the importance of overcoming different forms of self-criticism, including poor self-esteem and perfectionism. These positive or negative variables clearly influence the quality of our lives. But is self-criticism always a bad thing, and is self-enhancement really so unequivocally good? What are the costs and benefits associated with each?

In Self-Criticism and Self-Enhancement: Theory, Research, and Clinical Implications, editor Edward C. Chang has enlisted over 25 distinguished psychologists and scholars who present the pros and cons of regarding self-criticism or self-enhancement as either "good" or "bad." Collectively, they illustrate the benefits of evaluating these concepts more complexly to demonstrate how negative and positive psychological variables may function as a virtue in one situation and as a vice in another situation. Drawing on the works of both philosophers and researchers, the contributors search for a deeper and broader understanding of these fundamental psychological concepts, and they evaluate their effect on individuals and the larger society.

Table of Contents

Contributors

Foreword
—Christopher Peterson

Preface

  1. Introduction to Self-Criticism and Self-Enhancement: Views From Ancient Greece to the Modern World
    —Edward C. Chang

I. Self-Enhancement as Good, Self-Criticism as Bad

  1. On the Psychological Benefits of Self-Enhancement
    —Margaret A. Marshall and Jonathon D. Brown
  2. On the Physical Health Benefits of Self-Enhancement
    —Suzanne C. Segerstrom and Abbey R. Roach
  3. On the Psychological Hazards of Self-Criticism
    — Christian Holle and Rick Ingram
  4. On Self-Criticism as Interpersonally Maladaptive
    —Jill M. Holm-Denoma, Ainhoa Otamendi, and Thomas E. Joiner Jr.

II. Self-Criticism as Good, Self-Enhancement as Bad

  1. Defensive Pessimism as a Positive Self-Critical Tool
    —Julie K. Norem
  2. The Role of Self-Criticism in Self-Improvement and Face Maintenance Among Japanese
    —Takeshi Hamamura and Steven J. Heine
  3. On the Psychological Costs of Self-Enhancement
    —C. Randall Colvin and Robert Griffo
  4. On the Physical Health Costs of Self-Enhancement
    —William M. P. Klein and Katrina L. Cooper

III. Self-Criticism and Self-Enhancement as Both Good and Bad

  1. A Functional Approach to Explaining Fluctuations in Future Outlooks: From Self-Enhancement to Self-Criticism
    —James A. Shepperd, Patrick J. Carroll, and Kate Sweeny
  2. On When Self-Enhancement and Self-Criticism Function Adaptively and Maladaptively
    —Constantine Sedikides and Michelle Luke

IV. Clinical Implications of Self-Enhancement and Self-Criticism

  1. On Promoting Adaptive Self-Enhancement in Psychotherapy
    —James L. Pretzer
  2. On Promoting Adaptive Self-Criticism in Psychotherapy
    — Raymond M. Bergner
  3. Self-Criticism and Self-Enhancement: From Complexities of the Present to a Complex Future
    —Edward C. Chang, Rita Chang, Lawrence J. Sanna, and Allison M. Kade

Author Index

Subject Index

About the Editor