The Challenge in Mathematics and Science Education: Psychology's Response

Pages: 379
Item #: 4318260
ISBN: 978-1-55798-207-0
List Price: $9.95
Member/Affiliate Price: $9.95
Copyright: 1993
Format: Hardcover
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Overview

A recent National Education Summit proposal stated that by the year 2000 all U.S. students should leave high school with mastery over "challenging subject matter, including English, Mathematics, Science, History, and Geography" and that U.S. students should rank first in the world in mathematics and science education.

This volume discusses, from the perspective of contemporary American psychology, the underlying scientific principles and mechanisms necessary to drive the process of educational change to achieve these goals. The book also addresses the variables of ethnicity and gender as they are related to academic performance in mathematics and science education. The chapter authors represent diverse perspectives, including social, cognitive, school, and clinical psychology.

Table of Contents

List of Contributors

Foreword

Preface

Introduction
—Louis A. Penner

I. The Educational Context

  1. An Intersection of Public Policy and Social Science: Gifted Students and Education in Mathematics and Science
    —James J. Gallagher

II. Cognitive, Affective, and Situational Factors in Mathematics and Science Education

Introduction
—Douglas L. Nelson

  1. Extending the Life Span of Knowledge
    —Harry P. Bahrick
  2. Cognition and Emotion: Theories, Implications, and Educational Applications
    —Henry C. Ellis, Larry J. Varner, and Andrew S. Becker
  3. The Jasper Series: Theoretical Foundations and Data on Problem Solving and Transfer
    —John Bransford and the Cognition and Technology Group of Vanderbilt University
  4. For Research to Reform Education and Cognitive Science
    —James G. Greeno

III. Social and Cultural Factors in Mathematics and Science Education

Introduction
—George M. Batsche

  1. Psychosocial Aspects of Cultural Influences on Learning Mathematics and Science
    —James M. Jones
  2. Gender Differences in Mathematics Ability, Anxiety, and Attitudes: What Do Meta-Analyses Tell Us?
    —Janet Shibley Hyde
  3. Gender Differences in Cognitive Style: Implications for Mathematics Performance and Achievement
    —Diane McGuinness

IV. Applied Psychological Research on Mathematics and Science Education

Introduction
—Howard M. Knoff

  1. Learner Centered Psychological Principles for Enhancing Education: Applications in School Settings
    —Barbara L. McCombs
  2. Developmental Diversity in Mathematical and Scientific Competence
    —Daniel P. Keating
  3. Adaptive and Nonadaptive Characteristics of Low-Income Children's Mathematical Strategy Use
    —Robert S. Siegler

Index

About the Editors

Editor Bios

Louis A. Penner received his PhD in Social Psychology from Michigan State University in 1969. He is currently a professor in the Psychology Department at the University of South Florida and was chair of the department for seven years. He is a consulting editor for the Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology and a member of the APA Committee on Accreditation.

George M. Batsche received his EdD in School Psychology from Ball State University in 1978. He is currently a professor in the School Psychology Program in the Department of Psychological and Social Foundations at the University of South Florida. He is a Fellow of Division 16 of APA and the immediate past president of the National Association of School Psychologists.

Howard M. Knoff received his PhD in School Psychology from Syracuse University in 1980. He is currently professor in and director of the School Psychology Program in the Department of Psychological and Social Foundations at the University of South Florida. He is a fellow of Division 16 of APA and a past president of the National Association of School Psychologists.

Douglas L. Nelson received his PhD in Experimental Psychology from the University of Wisconsin (Madison) in 1967. He is currently professor in and director of the Experimental Psychology Program in the Psychology Department at the University of South Florida. He is a fellow of Division 3 of APA and a consulting editor for the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Memory and Cognition.