Computational Modeling of Behavior in Organizations: The Third Scientific Discipline

Pages: 309
Item #: 4318910
ISBN: 978-1-55798-639-9
List Price: $39.95
Member/Affiliate Price: $34.95
Copyright: 2000
Format: Hardcover
FREE Shipping

For individuals in the U.S. & U.S. territories

Note: This book is out of print and no longer available for purchase.
Overview

Individual chapters of this book are available to purchase online.

This pioneering book describes the newest method for predicting outcomes that result from the complex and dynamic ways that organizations work. By creating "virtual organizations," computational modeling demonstrates the final effects of complex interactions, enabling researchers to confront the logic of their theories before time-consuming and costly data collection occurs.Through modeling, vital questions in both theoretical and applied research can be addressed.

Contributing authors describe how they have used this powerful research method to study a wide range of typical organizational problems, such as employee withdrawal; faking on personality tests; the pressures of organizational change; and the formation, continuation, and dissolution of groups. By demonstrating processes that are not easily observable by traditional empirical methods, computational modeling promises to become an essential research method for revealing the dynamic effects of complex behaviors in organizations. This volume will show researchers both the advantages of using computational modeling and the best strategies, contexts, and methods for its use.

Table of Contents

Contributors

Foreword

Preface

  1. Introduction to Computational Modeling in Organizations: The Good That Modeling Does
    —Charles L. Hulin and Daniel R. Ilgen
  2. Virtual Organizations
    —Steven T. Seitz
  3. The Impact of Organizational Interventions on Behaviors: An Examination of Different Models of Withdrawal
    —Kathleen A. Hanisch
    Comment: Comparing Different Models of Withdrawal Using a Computational Model
    —Mark Fichman
  4. Examining the Fit Between Empirical Data and Theoretical Models
    —Liberty J. Munson and Charles L. Hulin
    Comment: Modeling Withdrawal: Theoretical, Empirical, and Methodological Implications
    —Nigel Nicholson
  5. Modeling Faking on Personality Test
    —Michael J. Zickar
    Comment: Computational Models of Personality and Faking
    —Richard P. DeShon
  6. Simulating Effects of Pay for Performance Systems on Pay–Performance Relationships
    —Donald P. Schwab and Craig A. Olson
    Comment: Consequences of Organizational Reward Systems
    —John R. Hollenbeck
  7. Information Distribution, Participation and Group Decision: Explorations with the DISCUSS and SPEAK Models
    —Garold Stasses
    Comment: The DISCUSS and SPEAK Models: Lessons on the Value of Linking Theory, Empirical Research, and Computer Simulation
    —M. Anjali Sastry
  8. Computational Modeling with Petri Nets: Solutions for Individual and Team Systems
    —Michael D. Coovert and David W. Dorsey
    Comment: Getting Tangled in One's Own (Petri) Net: On the Promises and Perils of Computational Modeling
    —Norbert L. Kerr
  9. Pressures to Uniformity and the Evolution of Cultural Norms: Modeling Dynamic Social Impact
    —Bibb Latane
    Comment: Simulations on the Cheap: The Latane Approach
    —James H. Davis
  10. Modeling Change in Fields of Organizations: Some Simulation Results
    —J. Miller McPherson
    Comment: The Formation, Continuation, and Dissolution of Informal Groups
    —Jeffrey R. Edwards
  11. Organizational Adaptation in Volatile Environments
    —Kathleen M Carley
    Comment: Modeling Structures of Organizations
    —David M Krackhardt
  12. Lessons Learned and Insights Gained
    —Daniel R. Ilgen and Charles L. Hulin

Author Index

Subject Index

About the Editors

Editor Bios

Daniel R. Ilgen, PhD, is the John A. Hannah distinguished professor of psychology and management at Michigan State University He received his PhD in psychology at the University of Illinois in 1969, and was on the industrial and organizational psychology faculty at Purdue University prior to being appointed to his current position in 1983. He has also served as a visiting professor at the University of Washington and the University of Western Australia. He is a past president of the Society of Industrial and Organizational Psychology.

He is the editor of Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, and a member of the editorial boards of four other journals. His research addresses issues of work motivation and behavior in teams. Most recently he has been involved in research on the quality of decision making in teams. His works appear as books, book chapters, and articles in such journals as the American Psychologist, Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, and Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.

Charles L. Hulin, PhD, is professor emeritus of psychology in the College of Liberal Arts, Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations, and the Institute of Aviation at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He received his PhD in psychology from Cornell University in 1963. He has been a visiting professor at the University of California at Berkeley and the University of Washington at Seattle, and was a member of the Center for Advanced Study at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He has served in a variety of committee and advisory positions for the US. government and for private industry.

From 1975 to 1982, Dr. Hulin was the associate editor of Journal of Applied Psychology, and since 1972 he has been a member of the editorial board of Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association, American Psychological Society, and the Society of Industrial and Organizational Psychology. He has twice received the Ghiselli Award from the Society of Organizational Psychology and received the Career Scientific Contributions Award from the Society of Organizational Psychology in 1997.

His research addresses issues of work motivation, job attitudes, job emotions, and organizational withdrawal, as well as the application of computational modeling to behaviors in organizations. He is a co-developer of WORKER, a computational modeling program that models how individuals withdraw from work organizations. He is a co-author of four books and has published in Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, Psychological Bulletin, Human Factors, Journal of Cross Cultural Psychology, Journal of Vocational Behavior, and Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.