PsycTESTS® Sample Records

These sample records from the PsycTESTS® database show Test Master Profiles with a Test Development, Test Review, and Test Use Record. A Test Primary Data sample record illustrates a commercial test indexed in the database.
Test Development Record

Test Master Profile

Test Name Causal Dimension Scale
Authors Costarelli, Sandro
doi 10.1037/t08563-000
Construct Causal Dimensions; Ingroup Identification; Social Identity
Purpose The purpose of this scale is to assess causal dimensions affecting social identity and ingroup identification.
Administration Method Paper
Summary The Causal Dimension Scale (Costarelli, 2012) was developed in a study examining social identity threat, group identity, and attributions of poor group performance. Participants in the study were 80 students (mean age = 19.22 yrs) attending secondary schools in Treviso, Italy. By adapting relevant items drawn from McAuley, Duncan, and Russel's (1992) causal dimension scale for the current unit of analysis (the ingroup), a 3-item scale was developed to measure causal dimensions underlying participants' attributions. Participants were presented with one bipolar 6-point scale (as adapted from the 3 items of the corresponding subscale in McAuley et al.'s measure) anchored in their extremes by opposing possible causes of the group-unfavorable outcome establishing the intergroup status differential. This bipolar scale measured temporal instability (Is the cause... permanent [= 1] vs. temporary [= 6]). The internal consistency of the scale after averaging across items was satisfactory (α = .85).

Test Development Record

PsycTESTS Unique Identifier 9999-08563-001
Reported In Costarelli, Sandro. Coping with intergroup threat via biased attributions to low group effort: The moderating roles of ingroup identification, legitimacy, and instability of intergroup status. Social Psychology, Vol 43(1), 2012, 47-59. doi: 10.1027/1864-9335/a000083
Construct Causal Dimensions; Ingroup Identification; Social Identity
Purpose The purpose of this scale is to assess causal dimensions affecting social identity and ingroup identification.
Language English
Author Costarelli, Sandro
Email Costarelli, Sandro: sandro.costarelli@unitn.it
Correspondence Address Costarelli, Sandro: University of Trento, Department of Cognitive Sciences and Education, Corso Bettini, 31, Rovereto (TN), Italy, 38068
Affiliation Costarelli, Sandro University of Trento
Format Test items are responded to on a bipolar 6-point scale.
Number of Items This is a 3-item measure.
Administration Method Paper
Permissions May use for Research/Teaching
Fee No
Commercial No
Reliability Internal Consistency: The internal consistency of the scale after averaging across items was satisfactory (α = .85).
Validity Construct Validity: Preliminary exploratory factor analysis with Oblimin factor rotation specifying that factors with eigenvalues greater than 1 be retained, determined that the scale had sufficient construct validity. A one-factor solution was extracted accounting for 72% of the variance. All factor loadings exceeded .66.
Population Human; Male; Female
Population Details Sample: Secondary School Students
Age Group Adolescence (13-17 yrs)
Keywords Attributions; Causal Dimension Scale; Ingroup Identification; Social Identity; Legitimacy Conditions; Group Stability
Index Terms Attribution; Causality; Group Identity; Ingroup Outgroup; Rating Scales; Social Identity
Release Date 20120213
Test Review Record

Test Master Profile

Test Name Cataldo Lung Cancer Stigma Scale, 2011
Authors Cataldo, Janine;Slaughter, Robert;Jahan, Thierry M.;Pongquan, Voranan L.;Hwang, Won Ju
doi 10.1037/t02754-000
Construct Perceived Stigma
Purpose The purpose of the Cataldo Lung Cancer Stigma Scale is to measure the stigma perceived by people with lung cancer.
Administration Method Electronic
Summary The 31-item Cataldo Lung Cancer Stigma Scale (Cataldo et al, 2011) was developed to measure the stigma perceived by people with lung cancer. 186 patients with lung cancer were administered the scale online. Four factors emerged: Stigma and Shame, Social Isolation, Discrimination, and Smoking. Inspection of unrotated first-factor loadings showed support for a general stigma factor. Construct validity was supported by relationships with related constructs: self-esteem, depression, social support, and social conflict. Coefficient alphas ranging from 0.75-0.97 for the subscales (0.96 for stigma and shame, 0.97 for social isolation, 0.9 for discrimination, and 0.75 for smoking) and 0.98 for the 43-item Cataldo Lung Cancer Stigma Scale (CLCSS) provided evidence of reliability. The final version of the CLCSS was 31 items. Coefficient alpha was recalculated for the total Stigma scale (0.96) and the four subscales (0.97 for Stigma and Shame, 0.96 for Social Isolation, 0.92 for Discrimination, and 0.75 for Smoking).

Test Review Record

Unique Identifier 9999-02754-002
Reported in Cataldo, Janine K.; Slaughter, Robert; Jahan, Thierry M.; Pongquan, Voranan L.; Hwang, Won Ju. Measuring stigma in people with lung cancer: Psychometric testing of the Cataldo Lung Cancer Stigma Scale. Oncology Nursing Forum, Vol 38(1), Jan 2011, E46-E54. doi: 10.1188/11.ONF.E46-E54
Construct Perceived Stigma
Purpose The purpose of the Cataldo Lung Cancer Stigma Scale is to measure the stigma perceived by people with lung cancer.
Language English
Author Cataldo, Janine K.;Slaughter, Robert;Jahan, Thierry M.;Pongquan, Voranan L.;Hwang, Won Ju
Affiliation Cataldo, Janine University of California Department of Physiological Nursing-Gerontology
  Jahan, Thierry M. University of California Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center
  Pongquan, Voranan L. University of California School of Nursing
  Hwang, Won Ju University of California School of Nursing
Format Four-point response scale: Strongly Agree, Agree, Disagree, Strongly Disagree.
Number of Items The measure consists of 31 items distributed across four subscales: Stigma and Shame, Social Isolation, Discrimination, and Smoking.
Administration Method Electronic
Permissions May use for Research/Teaching
Fee Unknown
Commercial No
Reliability Internal Consistency: Coefficient alphas for the total stigma scale (0.96) and the four subscales (0.97 for stigma and shame, 0.96 for social isolation, 0.92 for discrimination, and 0.75 for smoking) provided evidence of reliability.
Validity Criterion-related Validity: Self-esteem scores correlated negatively with the total stigma score (r = -.723, p < .01) and all subscale scores; self-esteem had the strongest negative correlation with the smoking subscale score (r = -.227, p < .01). Similarly, higher levels of depression were associated with higher levels of overall stigma (r = .616, p < .01), as well as higher levels for each of the subscales.
Population Human; Male; Female
Population Details Sample: Patients with Lung Cancer
Age Group Adulthood (18 yrs & older); Young Adulthood (18-29 yrs); Thirties (30-39 yrs); Middle Age (40-64 yrs); Aged (65 yrs & older); Very Old (85 yrs & older)
Keywords Cataldo Lung Cancer Stigma Scale; Construct Validity; Factor Analysis; Psychometric Analysis; Scale Reliability; Stigma and Shame; Smoking; Social Isolation; Criterion-related Validity; Discrimination; Test Review
Index Terms Factor Analysis; Lung Disorders; Neoplasms; Rating Scales; Shame; Social Discrimination; Social Isolation; Stigma; Test Reliability; Test Validity; Tobacco Smoking
Release Date 20110912
Test Use Record

Test Master Profile

Test Name Evidence of Patient-Centered Behavior, 2010
Authors Drach-Zahavy, Anat
doi 10.1037/t01219-000
Construct Health Personnel Service Behavior
Purpose The Evidence of Patient-Centered Behavior Scale was developed in 2005 to be a structured observation sheet, which has been described as one of the better methods for assessing service behavior in health care settings.
Summary The Evidence of Patient-Centered Behavior Scale was developed in 2005 to be a structured observation sheet, which has been described as one of the better methods for assessing service behavior in health care settings. This is due to the fact that studies relying on nurses' or patients' retrospective self-report of service behavior suffer from estimation biases (Epstein et al., 2005). The assessment tool was nine evaluation criteria on a 5-point Likert-type scale (from 1 = not attempted, to 5 = very well done, with a nonapplicable option). At the end was a space for comments. The scale has been reported to be one of the most reliable and valid scales in a comparison study of 15 existing measures of patient-centered care (Schrimer et al., 2005). Service behavior was averaged across the nine evaluation criteria and across the three observed encounters. Cronbach's alpha ranged from .85 to .88. Analysis of the comments in the free space revealed that nurses' actual behaviors were well rated with the assessment tool. Only in negligible cases (about 10 observations) did the observer note that the item was not applicable to the given observed encounter.

Test Use Record

Unique Identifier 9999-01219-001
Reported in Drach-Zahavy, Anat. How does service workers' behavior affect their health? Service climate as a moderator in the service behavior–health relationships. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, Vol 15(2), Apr 2010, 105-119. doi: 10.1037/a0018573
Construct Health Personnel Service Behavior
Purpose The Evidence of Patient-Centered Behavior Scale was developed in 2005 to be a structured observation sheet, which has been described as one of the better methods for assessing service behavior in health care settings.
Language English
Author Drach-Zahavy, Anat
Email Drach-Zahavy, Anat: anatdz@research.haifa.ac.il
Correspondence Address Drach-Zahavy, Anat: University of Haifa, Department of Welfare and, Mount Carmel, Haifa, Israel, 31905, anatdz@research.haifa.ac.il
Affiliation Drach-Zahavy, Anat University of Haifa Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences
Format The Evidence of Patient-Centered Behavior Scale consists of nine evaluation criteria rated on a 5-point Likert-type scale (from 1 = not attempted, to 5 = very well done, with a nonapplicable option). At the end is a space for comments.
Number of items The Evidence of Patient-Centered Behavior includes 9 items.
Permissions May use for Research/Teaching
Fee No
Commercial No
Reliability The scale has been reported to be one of the most reliable scales in a comparison study of 15 existing measures of patient-centered care (Schrimer et al., 2005). Service behavior was averaged across the nine evaluation criteria and across the three observed encounters. Cronbach's alpha ranged from .85 to .88.
Validity The scale has been reported to be one of the most valid scales in a comparison study of 15 existing measures of patient-centered care (Schrimer et al., 2005).
Population Human; Male; Female
Population Details Location: Israel
Age Group Adulthood (18 yrs & older)
Setting Health Care
Keywords Evidence of Patient-Centered Behavior; test use; nurses; health personnel service behavior; health care settings; test reliability; test validity
Index Terms Health Personnel; Nurses; Observation Methods; Professional Competence; Test Reliability; Test Validity; Therapeutic Processes
Release Date 20110912
Test Primary Data Record

Test Master Profile

Test Name Adolescent Coping Scale — Second Edition (ACS), 2011
Authors Frydenberg, Erica;Lewis, Ramon
doi 10.1037/t02045-000
Construct Adolescent Psychology, Coping Behavior
Purpose The purpose of the Adolescent Coping Scale is to assess the degree of usage of a broad range of coping strategies.
Administration Method Paper
Summary The Adolescent Coping Scale (ACS; Frydenberg and Lewis, 1993) is a self-report inventory designed to assess the degree of usage of 18 distinct coping strategies in adolescents. Key features include: focuses on what young people do as opposed to what they think they should be doing, stimulates, and can be used for the initiation of self-directed behavioral change and stimulation of group discussion. All items are answered on a 5-point range of responses. Both long and short forms are available. The Practitioner's Kit includes a Manual and ten of each Profile Chart, Long Form Questionnaire, Short Form Questionnaire and Scoring Sheet. Qualifications are required to purchase.

Test Primary Data Record

Unique Identifier 9999-02045-001
Construct Adolescent Psychology; Coping Behavior
Purpose The purpose of the Adolescent Coping Scale is to assess the degree of usage of a broad range of coping strategies.
Language English
Publisher Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER)
Web Site https://shop.psych.acer.edu.au/acer-shop/group/HU
Format 5-point, Likert-type: Doesn't apply or don't do it (1), Used very little (2), Used sometimes (3), Used often (4), and Used a great deal (5).
Number of items The Short Form of the Adolescent Coping Scale consists of 18 items and the Long Form consists of 80 items.
Administration Method Paper
Administration Time The Short Form of the Adolescent Coping Scale takes 2 minutes to complete and the Long Form takes 10 minutes to complete.
Permissions Contact Publisher
Fee Yes
Commercial Yes
Reliability Reliability: item-scale correlations ranging from 0.70 to 0.92.
Validity Validity: Over 25 studies listed in Manual. They provide strong support for the construct validity of the ACS-2. In broad terms, greater use of non- productive coping strategies was associated with greater dysfunction. Greater use of productive coping strategies was associated with greater well-being and better academic performance.
Population Human; Male; Female
Population Details Intended Population: Adolescents
Age Group Adolescence (13-17 yrs)
Keywords Adolescent Attitudes; Adolescent Coping Scale; Coping Strategies; Self Report Inventory
Index Terms Adolescent Attitudes; Attitude Measurement; Coping Behavior; Self Report 
Release Date 20111212