Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology®

ISSN: 1099-9809
eISSN: 1939-0106
Published: quarterly, beginning in January
ISI Impact Factor: 1.755
Psychology - Social : 21 of 60
Description

Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology ® seeks to advance the psychological science of culture, ethnicity, and race through the publication of empirical research, as well as theoretical, conceptual, and integrative review articles that will stimulate further empirical research, on basic and applied psychological issues relevant to racial and ethnic groups that have been historically subordinated, underrepresented, or underserved.

Especially welcome are articles that

  • Contribute to the psychological understanding of issues related to culture, race, and ethnicity through theory-driven or community-driven research. These issues may include (but are not limited to) developmental processes, family relationships, intergroup relations, mental health and well-being, disparities in mental health, health, and education/employment, and treatment and intervention;
  • Involve new, innovative or underutilized research and statistical methods and paradigms. These approaches may include development or cultural adaptation of psychological measures, laboratory experiments, community-based participatory research, meta-analyses, mixed-methods and qualitative, longitudinal, cross-national, and biological and genetic approaches.
  • Apply psychological science to the education and training of psychologists in matters regarding persons from diverse cultural, racial, and ethnic backgrounds, including delivery of evidence-based interventions to racial and ethnic groups that have been underrepresented and underserved; and
  • Critique and promote better science, public policy and service delivery through appropriate application of psychological theory and research on culture, ethnicity, and race. These articles may involve new theory or conceptualization and integrative reviews.

(Formerly Cultural Diversity and Mental Health)

Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology® is a registered trademark of American Psychological Association
Editorial Board

Incoming Editor

Richard M. Lee
University of Minnesota

Incoming Associate Editors

Alexander M. Czopp
Western Washington University

Norweeta G. Milburn
University of California, Los Angeles

Ezemenari M. Obasi
University of Houston

Deborah Rivas-Drake
University of Michigan

Paul Vedder
Leiden University

Tiffany Yip
Fordham University

Incoming Editorial Board

Germine H. Awad
The University of Texas at Austin

Anthony L. Burrow
Cornell University

Belinda Campos
University of California, Irvine

Esteban V. Cardemil
Clark University

Chakema C. Carmack
University of Houston

José M. Causadias
Hamilton College

Gabriela Chavira
California State University, Northridge

Sylvia X. Chen
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Yoonsun Choi
The University of Chicago

Rosalie Corona
Virginia Commonwealth University

Matthew A. Diemer
Michigan State University

Julie A. Garcia
California Polytechnic State University

Mitchvan Geel
Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands

Joseph P. Gone
University of Michigan

Takeshi Hamamura
The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Wizdom Powell Hammond
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Gabriel Horenczyk
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel

Virginia W. Huynh
California State University, Northridge

Inga Jasinskaja-Lahti
University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland

Su Yeong Kim
The University of Texas at Austin

Virginia Kwan
Arizona State University

Naa Oyo A. Kwate
Rutgers University

Christina S. Lee
Northeastern University

Cindy H. Liu
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School

William M. Liu
The University of Iowa

Robert W. Livingston
University of Sussex, Sussex, United Kingdom

Brian S. Lowery
Stanford University

Keith B. Maddox
Tufts University

Winnie W.S. Mak
The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Matthew J. Miller
University of Maryland

Velma V. Murry
Vanderbilt University

Enrique W. Neblett, Jr.
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Anthony D. Ong
Cornell University

Karen Phalet
University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium

Alex L. Pieterse
State University of New York at Albany

Jason Q. Purnell
Washington University in St. Louis

Andrew Rasmussen
Fordham University

Luis M. Rivera
Rutgers University

David L. Sam
University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway

Carlos E. Santos
Arizona State University

Eleanor K. Seaton
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Kyoung Ok Seol
Ewha Womans University, Seoul, South Korea

Selcuk R. Sirin
New York University

José A. Soto
Pennsylvania State University

Gabriela L. Stein
University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Jenny C. Su
St. Lawrence University

Charlotte U. Tate
San Francisco State University

Lucas Torres
Marquette University

Alisia G.T.T. Tran
Arizona State University

Adriana J. Umaña-Taylor
Arizona State University

Maykel Verkuyten
Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands

Rheeda L. Walker
University of Houston

Chun Wang
University of Minnesota

Jennifer B. Webb
University of North Carolina, Charlotte

Clara L. Wilkins
Wesleyan University

Dawn P. Witherspoon
Pennsylvania State University

Lawrence H. Yang
Columbia University

Christine J. Yeh
University of San Francisco

Eunju Yoon
Loyola University Chicago

Qing Zhou
University of California, Berkeley


Outgoing Editorial Board

Outgoing Editor

Michael A. Zárate
University of Texas at El Paso

Outgoing Associate Editors

Art W. Blume
Washington State University

Tabbye M. Chavous
University of Michigan

Richard Lee
University of Minnesota

Norweeta G. Milburn
UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior

Tiffany Yip
Fordham University

Outgoing Book Review Editor

Jeffery Scott Mio
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

Outgoing Editorial Board

Alvin N. Alvarez
San Francisco State University

Leslie Ashburn-Nardo
Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis

Germine Awad
University of Texas at Austin

Nida Bikmen
Denison University

Lisa Bowleg
Drexel University

Joseph M. Cervantes
California State University, Fullerton

Shauna M. Cooper
University of South Carolina

Alexander M. Czopp
Western Washington University

E. J. R. David
University of Alaska, Anchorage

Melanie M. Domenech Rodríguez
Utah State University

Bryana H. French
University of Missouri at Columbia

Allison Grupski
Loyola University

Carla D. Hunter
University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign

Bryan S. K. Kim
University of Hawai'i at Hilo

Su Yeong Kim
The University of Texas at Austin

Anna Lau
University of California, Los Angeles

Christina Lee
Northeastern University

Brian McNeill
Washington State University

Michael Mobley
Salem State University

Osvaldo F. Morera
University of Texas at El Paso

Enrique Neblett
University of North Carolina

Ezemenari Obasi
The University of Houston

Alex Pieterse
Monash University

Jorge I. Ramirez Garcia
Oregon Research Institute

Kim Rios
Ohio University

Eleanor Seaton
University of North Carolina

Margaret Shih
University of California, Los Angeles

Kumea Shorter-Gooden
University of Maryland

Moin Syed
University of Minnesota

Emilio C. Ulloa
San Diego State University

Jennifer Best Webb
University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Rhonda L. White-Johnson
University of South Carolina

Hyung Chol Yoo
Arizona State University

Outgoing Student Editor

Stephanie Quezada
University of Texas at El Paso

Manuscript Coordinator

Marc Drucker


Council of Research Elders

Guillermo Bernal
University of Puerto Rico

J. Manuel Casas
University of California, Santa Barbara

Lillian Comas-Díaz
Transcultural Mental Health Institute, Washington, DC

Janet Helms
Boston College

James S. Jackson
University of Michigan

John B. Jemmott III
University of Pennsylvania

James M. Jones
University of Delaware

Teresa D. LaFromboise
Stanford University

Frederick T. L. Leong
Michigan State University

Gerardo Marin
University of San Francisco

Thomas A. Parham
University of California, Irvine

Derald Wing Sue
Teachers College, Columbia University

Stanley Sue
University of California, Davis

Richard M. Suinn
Colorado State University

Joseph E. Trimble
Western Washington University

Reiko Homma True
El Cerrito, CA

Luis A. Vargas
University of New Mexico

Melba J. T. Vasquez.
Independent Practice, Austin, TX

Gail E. Wyatt
UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior

Abstracting & Indexing

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Instructions to Authors

Prior to submission, please carefully read and follow the submission guidelines detailed below. Manuscripts that do not conform to the submission guidelines may be returned without review.

Submission

Submit manuscripts electronically (.rtf or .doc) through the Manuscript Submission Portal.

Manuscript Submission Portal Entrance

Richard M. Lee
Elliott N563
Department of Psychology
University of Minnesota
75 East River Road
Minneapolis, MN 55455

General correspondence may be directed to the Editor's Office.

Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology ® seeks to advance the psychological science of culture, ethnicity, and race through the publication of empirical research, as well as theoretical, conceptual, and integrative review articles that will stimulate further empirical research, on basic and applied psychological issues relevant to racial and ethnic groups that have been historically subordinated, underrepresented, or underserved.

Especially welcome are articles that

  • Contribute to the psychological understanding of issues related to culture, race, and ethnicity through theory-driven or community-driven research. These issues may include (but are not limited to) developmental processes, family relationships, intergroup relations, mental health and well-being, disparities in mental health, health, and education/employment, and treatment and intervention;
  • Involve new, innovative or underutilized research and statistical methods and paradigms. These approaches may include development or cultural adaptation of psychological measures, laboratory experiments, community-based participatory research, meta-analyses, mixed-methods and qualitative, longitudinal, cross-national, and biological and genetic approaches.
  • Apply psychological science to the education and training of psychologists in matters regarding persons from diverse cultural, racial, and ethnic backgrounds, including delivery of evidence-based interventions to racial and ethnic groups that have been underrepresented and underserved; and
  • Critique and promote better science, public policy and service delivery through appropriate application of psychological theory and research on culture, ethnicity, and race. These articles may involve new theory or conceptualization and integrative reviews.

Types of Articles

Multi-study papers
Multi-study reports involve quantitative and qualitative research with 2 or more studies using different samples. Multi-study papers are more integrative in nature and provide a strong theoretical and empirical contribution to the literature. Manuscripts are limited to 10,000 words of text, including abstract, though shorter manuscripts are strongly encouraged. The word limit does not include reference pages, tables, and figures. Manuscript longer than 10,000 words need to be approved by the editor prior to submission and must make a truly outstanding contribution.

Single study reports
Single study reports of quantitative and qualitative research are between 4,000 and 6,000 words of text (including abstract). The word limit does not include reference pages, tables, and figures. Theoretical, conceptual, and integrative review manuscripts also must adhere to this word limit.

Brief reports
Brief reports are between 2,000 and 3,000 words of text (including abstract). The word limit does not include reference pages, tables, and figures.

Submissions involving pilot data findings, replication of published study findings, psychometric investigations of culture-specific measures, or substantial cultural adaptation of existing measures are most suitable for brief reports. Mere translation and validation of existing psychological measures that are not culture-specific are not appropriate for the journal.

Special Issue and Section Protocol

Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology welcomes proposals for special issues or sections that address a substantive area in the psychological study of culture, ethnicity, and race.

The editorial team will collectively review and approve all proposals. An Associate Editor will serve as the action editor for all special issues/sections and work closely with the guest editor(s) of the special issue/section.

In addition, the journal editorial team (composed of the Editor and Associate Editors) will initiate special issues and sections to address gaps in the literature. In these instances, a call for papers will be announced and widely distributed to solicit manuscripts.

Authors wishing to submit a proposal for a special issue or section should submit the following to the editor.

Proposals must include the following information in this order.

  • Clearly describe the topic or theme for the special issue/section and a rationale for why the special issue/section is needed right now. Be sure to articulate how it is directly related to the advancement of the psychological study of culture, ethnicity, and race. This description should be no longer than 2 paragraphs or 1 page.
  • Briefly explain whether the solicited or accepted papers will be empirical or integrative reviews. A collection of position papers is strongly discouraged unless they include empirical data or integrative reviews. Empirical papers will be given a higher priority as well. Only one commentary by a distinguished expert in the field is allowed for a special issue/section.
  • Denote whether it will be a special issue or special section. Special sections (approximately 6–7 papers) are preferred, especially if contributing authors and papers are already identified.
  • Specify whether the papers are still to be invited through an open call or whether it is a set of proposed papers that have already been identified. Provide a rationale for either approach.
    • If a call for papers, provide the actual call for papers announcement that will be distributed. Provide examples of how proposals will be solicited, reviewed, and selected.
    • If a set of proposed papers, provide the titles, authors, and abstracts.
    • If a commentary is part of the special issue/section, provide the name and affiliation of the commentator, including areas of expertise.
  • Provide the name and contact of the proposed guest editor, as well as a brief description of the person's qualifications to serve in this capacity. All guest editors will work with the assigned Associate Editor, who will make the final editorial decisions.
  • Provide a timeline for the special issue/section, including solicitation dates, submission due dates, review and revision completion deadlines, and publication target date.
  • A list of potential reviewers and some information on their areas of expertise.

Peer Review

Because Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology uses an anonymous peer-review process, authors' names and affiliations should appear only on the title page of the manuscript.

Style of Manuscripts

When providing racial or ethnic designations, please use initial capital letters. Webster's New World Dictionary of American English, 3rd College Edition, is the accepted source for spelling. Define unusual abbreviations at the first mention in the text.

The text should be written in a uniform style, and its contents as submitted for consideration should be deemed by the author to be final and suitable for publication.

Title Page

The title page should contain the complete title of the manuscript, names and affiliations of all authors, institution(s) at which the work was performed, and name, address, telephone and fax numbers of the author responsible for correspondence.

Please include the word count of the text and abstract.

Authors should also provide a short title of not more than 45 characters (including spaces), and up to 5 key words, that will highlight the subject matter of the article.

Abstract and Keywords

All manuscripts must include an abstract containing a maximum of 250 words typed on a separate page. For commentaries, the abstract is limited to 150 words. For research and review articles, the abstract is limited to 250 words and the following headings are required:

  • Objectives: Study aims or hypotheses
  • Methods: Sample description (including size, race or ethnicity, gender, average age) and research design 
  • Results: Results that pertain to study aims or hypotheses 
  • Conclusions: Implication of findings After the abstract, please supply up to five keywords or brief phrases. Phrases are limited to three words maximum.

Participants: Description and Informed Consent

The Method section of each empirical report must contain a detailed description of the study participants, including (but not limited to) the following:

  • age
  • gender
  • ethnicity
  • SES
  • clinical diagnoses and comorbidities (as appropriate)
  • any other relevant demographics

In the Discussion section of the manuscript, authors should discuss the diversity of their study samples and the generalizability of their findings.

The Method section also must include a statement describing how informed consent was obtained from the participants (or their parents/guardians) and indicate that the study was conducted in compliance with an appropriate Internal Review Board.

Measures

The Method section of empirical reports must contain a sufficiently detailed description of the measures used so that the reader understands the item content, scoring procedures, and total scores or subscales. Evidence of reliability and validity with similar populations should be provided.

Statistical Reporting of Effect Size and Confidence Intervals

We now require that authors report means and standard deviations for all continuous study variables and the effect sizes for the primary study findings. Note that the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA, 2001, pp. 25–26) emphasizes the importance of reporting effect sizes in addition to the usual tests of statistical significance.

Effect sizes, or similar statistics such as "goodness-of-fit" indicators for structural equation modeling, can be generated by most statistical packages that are used in the behavioral sciences. If effect sizes are not available for a particular test, then authors should convey this in their cover letter at the time of submission.

Citations in the Text

In the text, references should be cited by the name and date system. Both names are cited for a work with two authors. When a work has fewer than six authors, cite all names the first time the reference in the text appears; subsequent citations should only cite the first author's name, followed by "et al." When a work has six or more authors, cite only the first author's surname, followed by "et al." Refer to the following citation examples.

  • In a similar case study, Haley (1973) utilized…
  • One authority (Green, 1991) suggested…

Reference List

References should be arranged in alphabetical order of the author's names. Multiple entries by one author are arranged chronologically, with the earliest publication appearing first. When more than one publication by the same author is cited for a year, arrange the citations alphabetically by title and distinguish the citation by lowercase letter: 1991a, 1991b, etc.

Publications by two or more authors should come after all publications by senior author alone. They are arranged alphabetically, after the first author's name, by the names of the second authors, and so on. Multiple books by the same pair or the same group of authors should be arranged chronologically.

The first line of the reference should be indented; subsequent lines should be flush left. Please adhere to stylistic guidelines set forth in the Publication Manual when preparing your reference list. Please note that the page numbers should be inclusive and journal or monograph series titles should not be abbreviated.

Note the punctuation in the following examples:

  • Journal Article:
    Hughes, G., Desantis, A., & Waszak, F. (2013). Mechanisms of intentional binding and sensory attenuation: The role of temporal prediction, temporal control, identity prediction, and motor prediction. Psychological Bulletin, 139, 133–151. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0028566
  • Authored Book:
    Rogers, T. T., & McClelland, J. L. (2004). Semantic cognition: A parallel distributed processing approach. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Chapter in an Edited Book:
    Gill, M. J., & Sypher, B. D. (2009). Workplace incivility and organizational trust. In P. Lutgen-Sandvik & B. D. Sypher (Eds.), Destructive organizational communication: Processes, consequences, and constructive ways of organizing (pp. 53–73). New York, NY: Taylor & Francis.

Tables

Each table must have a title and should be self-explanatory. Avoid duplicating information in the text. Number tables with Arabic numerals in order of appearance in the text. Indicate in the text where tables should be inserted.

Permissions

Authors of accepted papers must obtain and provide to the editor on final acceptance all necessary permissions to reproduce in print and electronic form any copyrighted work, including test materials (or portions thereof), photographs, and other graphic images (including those used as stimuli in experiments).

On advice of counsel, APA may decline to publish any image whose copyright status is unknown.

In addition to the permissions applicable to all APA journal articles, please note that reproduction of an unaltered figure, table, or block of text from any non-federal government publication requires permission from the copyright holder. All direct quotations should have a source and page citation.

Only the form of presentation is covered by copyright protection, not the content, so permission is necessary only when material is being reproduced without change. You may quote facts, express them in your own words, or construct a table or figure from published data without permission.

Publications Policies

APA policy prohibits an author from submitting the same manuscript for concurrent consideration by two or more publications.

See also APA Journals® Internet Posting Guidelines.

APA requires authors to reveal any possible conflict of interest in the conduct and reporting of research (e.g., financial interests in a test or procedure, funding by pharmaceutical companies for drug research).

Authors of accepted manuscripts are required to transfer the copyright to APA.

In addition to the publication policies applicable to all APA journal articles, Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology requires that all identifying details regarding the client(s) / patient(s), including but not limited to name, age, race, occupation, and place of residence, be altered to prevent recognition.

If a manuscript includes excerpts from transcripts of therapy sessions, you must obtain a signed release authorizing publication of the transcript from the client. Because the identity of patients may be confidential, we ask that you do not submit the signed release forms with the manuscript; you must, however, retain the signed release forms for your files.

All statements in, or omissions from, published manuscripts are the responsibility of authors, who will be asked to review proofs prior to publication.

Reprint order forms will be sent with the page proofs. No page charges will be levied against authors or their institutions for publication in the journal.

Manuscript Preparation

Prepare manuscripts according to the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th edition). Manuscripts may be copyedited for bias-free language (see Chapter 3 of the Publication Manual).

Review APA's Checklist for Manuscript Submission before submitting your article.

If your manuscript was mask reviewed, please ensure that the final version for production includes a byline and full author note for typesetting.

Double-space all copy. Other formatting instructions, as well as instructions on preparing tables, figures, references, metrics, and abstracts, appear in the Manual.

Below are additional instructions regarding the preparation of display equations, computer code, and tables.

Display Equations

We strongly encourage you to use MathType (third-party software) or Equation Editor 3.0 (built into pre-2007 versions of Word) to construct your equations, rather than the equation support that is built into Word 2007 and Word 2010. Equations composed with the built-in Word 2007/Word 2010 equation support are converted to low-resolution graphics when they enter the production process and must be rekeyed by the typesetter, which may introduce errors.

To construct your equations with MathType or Equation Editor 3.0:

  • Go to the Text section of the Insert tab and select Object.
  • Select MathType or Equation Editor 3.0 in the drop-down menu.

If you have an equation that has already been produced using Microsoft Word 2007 or 2010 and you have access to the full version of MathType 6.5 or later, you can convert this equation to MathType by clicking on MathType Insert Equation. Copy the equation from Microsoft Word and paste it into the MathType box. Verify that your equation is correct, click File, and then click Update. Your equation has now been inserted into your Word file as a MathType Equation.

Use Equation Editor 3.0 or MathType only for equations or for formulas that cannot be produced as Word text using the Times or Symbol font.

Computer Code

Because altering computer code in any way (e.g., indents, line spacing, line breaks, page breaks) during the typesetting process could alter its meaning, we treat computer code differently from the rest of your article in our production process. To that end, we request separate files for computer code.

In Online Supplemental Material
We request that runnable source code be included as supplemental material to the article. For more information, visit Supplementing Your Article With Online Material.

In the Text of the Article
If you would like to include code in the text of your published manuscript, please submit a separate file with your code exactly as you want it to appear, using Courier New font with a type size of 8 points. We will make an image of each segment of code in your article that exceeds 40 characters in length. (Shorter snippets of code that appear in text will be typeset in Courier New and run in with the rest of the text.) If an appendix contains a mix of code and explanatory text, please submit a file that contains the entire appendix, with the code keyed in 8-point Courier New.

Tables

Use Word's Insert Table function when you create tables. Using spaces or tabs in your table will create problems when the table is typeset and may result in errors.

Submitting Supplemental Materials

APA can place supplemental materials online, available via the published article in the PsycARTICLES® database. Please see Supplementing Your Article With Online Material for more details.

Figures

Graphics files are welcome if supplied as Tiff or EPS files. Multipanel figures (i.e., figures with parts labeled a, b, c, d, etc.) should be assembled into one file.

The minimum line weight for line art is 0.5 point for optimal printing.

For more information about acceptable resolutions, fonts, sizing, and other figure issues, please see the general guidelines.

When possible, please place symbol legends below the figure instead of to the side.

APA offers authors the option to publish their figures online in color without the costs associated with print publication of color figures.

The same caption will appear on both the online (color) and print (black and white) versions. To ensure that the figure can be understood in both formats, authors should add alternative wording (e.g., "the red (dark gray) bars represent") as needed.

For authors who prefer their figures to be published in color both in print and online, original color figures can be printed in color at the editor's and publisher's discretion provided the author agrees to pay:

  • $900 for one figure
  • An additional $600 for the second figure
  • An additional $450 for each subsequent figure

Ethical Principles

It is a violation of APA Ethical Principles to publish "as original data, data that have been previously published" (Standard 8.13).

In addition, APA Ethical Principles specify that "after research results are published, psychologists do not withhold the data on which their conclusions are based from other competent professionals who seek to verify the substantive claims through reanalysis and who intend to use such data only for that purpose, provided that the confidentiality of the participants can be protected and unless legal rights concerning proprietary data preclude their release" (Standard 8.14).

APA expects authors to adhere to these standards. Specifically, APA expects authors to have their data available throughout the editorial review process and for at least 5 years after the date of publication.

Authors are required to state in writing that they have complied with APA ethical standards in the treatment of their sample, human or animal, or to describe the details of treatment.

The APA Ethics Office provides the full Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct electronically on its website in HTML, PDF, and Word format. You may also request a copy by emailing or calling the APA Ethics Office (202-336-5930). You may also read "Ethical Principles," December 1992, American Psychologist, Vol. 47, pp. 1597–1611.

Other Information

Special Issues
  • History of Racial and Ethnic Minority Psychology

    Special issue of the APA journal Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, Vol. 15, No. 4, October 2009. Includes articles about history of psychology as it relates to African American, American Indian, Alaska Native, Asian American, Latino, and Native Hawaiian populations, as well as the cultural and historical context of indigenous ways of knowing; the minority fellowship program; and other general ethnic minority issues.

  • Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Racial and Ethnic Minority Individuals

    Special issue of the APA journal Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, Vol. 10, No. 3, August 2004. Includes articles about science and theory for lesbian, gay, and bisexual people of color; multiple minority status adolescents and mental health; ethnic/racial differences in the coming-out process; coping among black lesbians; race/ethnicity and sexual orientation; sexual risk as an outcome of social oppression; psychosocial issues among gay- and non-gay-identifying HIV-seropositive African American and Latino men; culture, trauma, and wellness; and oppression and resiliency in post-apartheid South Africa.

  • Asian American Acculturation and Ethnic Racial Identity

    Special issue of the APA journal Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, Vol. 7, No. 3, August 2001. Includes articles about acculturation, racial identity, and ethnic identity among Korean, Chinese, and other Asian American groups.

  • HIV/AIDS and Ethnic Minority Women, Families, and Communities

    Special issue of the APA journal Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, Vol. 5, No. 3, August 1999. Includes articles about gynecological, reproductive, and sexual health; motherhood; sexual risk taking; disclosure of HIV infection; trauma, substance use, and HIV risk; psychiatric disorders; relationship violence; male partners of HIV-positive women; and HIV/STD prevention research.