Group Dynamics: Theory, Research, and Practice

ISSN: 1089-2699
eISSN: 1930-7802
Published: quarterly, beginning in March
ISI Impact Factor: 1.021
Psychology - Social : 40 of 60

Journal Snapshot

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Examining the Effects of Group Influences
The incoming editor welcomes more research on group therapy outcomes and groups in the context of forensic and criminal justice (from Monitor on Psychology, June 2013)

Description

Group Dynamics: Theory, Research, and Practice publishes original empirical articles, theoretical analyses, literature reviews, and brief reports dealing with basic and applied topics in the field of group research and application.

The editors construe the phrase group dynamics in the broadest sense—the scientific study of all aspects of groups—and publish work by investigators in such fields as psychology, psychiatry, sociology, education, communication, and business.

The journal publishes articles examining groups in a range of contexts, including ad hoc groups in experimental settings, therapy groups, naturally forming friendship groups and cliques, organizational units, self-help groups, and learning groups.

Theoretically driven empirical studies of hypotheses that have implications for understanding and improving groups in organizational, educational, and therapeutic settings are particularly encouraged.

Editorial Board

Editor

David K. Marcus
Washington State University

Associate Editors

Bryan L. Bonner
University of Utah

Jay W. Jackson
Indiana University–Purdue University Fort Wayne

Janice R. Kelly
Purdue University

Cheri L. Marmarosh
George Washington University

Susan G. Straus
RAND Corporation

Giorgio A. Tasca
The Ottawa Hospital/University of Ottawa

Ed Board Reviewers

Michael R. Baumann
The University of Texas at San Antonio

Alexander R. Bolinger
Idaho State University

Eric C. Chen
Fordham University

Robert K. Conyne
University of Cincinnati

Traci Y. Craig
University of Idaho

Janice DeLucia-Waack
University at Buffalo, SUNY

Dennis J. Devine
Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis

Joyce Ehrlinger
Washington State University

Deborah L. Feltz
Michigan State University

Donelson R. Forsyth
University of Richmond

Les Greene
West Haven VA

Robert Grove
University of Western Australia

Nathan B. Hansen
Yale University

Verlin B. Hinsz
North Dakota State University

Thelma S. Horn
Miami University

Jeff Joireman
Washington State University

Anthony S. Joyce
University of Alberta

Steven J. Karau
Southern Illinois University at Carbondale

Dennis M. Kivlighan
University of Maryland

Glenn E. Littlepage
Middle Tennessee State University

Robert B. Lount
Ohio Statue University

Rayna D. Markin
Villanova University

Cheri Marmarosh
George Washington University

Richard L. Moreland
University of Pittsburgh

Karen D. Multon
University of Kansas

Bernard A. Nijstad
University of Groningen

Craig D. Parks
Washington State University

Ronald E. Riggio
Claremont McKenna College

Maria T. Riva
University of Denver

R. Scott Tindale
Loyola University of Chicago

Lyn Van Swol
University of Wisconsin–Madison

Nathanial G. Wade
Iowa State

Tessa West
New York University

Jan-Willem van Prooijen
Free University Amsterdam

Gwen Wittenbaum
Michigan State University

Virgil Zeigler-Hill
Oakland University

Abstracting & Indexing

Abstracting and indexing services providing coverage of Group Dynamics: Theory, Research, and Practice

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Instructions to Authors

Prior to submission, please carefully read and follow the submission guidelines detailed below. Manuscripts that do not conform to the submission guidelines may be returned without review.

Submission

Submit manuscripts electronically through the Manuscript Submission Portal.

Manuscript Submission Portal Entrance

General correspondence may be directed to the Editor's Office.

Group Dynamics: Theory, Research, and Practice publishes original empirical articles, theoretical analyses, literature reviews, and brief reports dealing with basic and applied topics in the field of group research and application. We construe the phrase group dynamics in the broadest sense — the scientific study of all aspects of groups — and publish work by investigators in such fields as psychology, psychiatry, sociology, education, communication, and business.

The journal publishes articles examining groups in a range of contexts, including ad hoc groups in experimental settings, therapy groups, naturally forming friendship groups and cliques, organizational units, self-help groups, and learning groups. Theoretically driven empirical studies of hypotheses that have implications for understanding and improving groups in organizational, educational, and therapeutic settings are particularly encouraged.

Masked Review Policy

Masked reviews are optional, and authors who wish such reviews must request them when submitting their work. They must also prepare their manuscript so that they cannot be identified: A separate title page with authors' names and affiliations must be provided, and any identifying footnotes or self-citations should be removed.

If your manuscript was mask reviewed, please ensure that the final version for production includes a byline and full author note for typesetting.

Manuscript Review

The Editor and Associate Editors, in consultation with members of the Journal's Editorial Review Board and ad hoc reviewers, will determine which manuscripts are accepted for publication in the journal. The primary criterion for acceptance will be the work's impact on understanding groups.

The introduction should be theoretically coherent and compelling, and any relevant literatures should be reviewed. The methods and measures used should be appropriate, the findings should be interpretable and statistically meaningful, and conclusions drawn should be suitable ones given the results obtained.

Authors of manuscripts examining basic theory and research should identify implications of their work for more applied areas, and authors of manuscripts dealing with more applied topics should draw conclusions that are relevant to basic research and theory.

When possible, manuscripts dealing with applied topics will be critiqued by a basic researcher, and basic research studies will be reviewed by a practitioner. In some cases these critiques will be published with the original article.

Types of Manuscripts

Group Dynamics is the forum for empirical research on all aspects of groups, and so primarily publishes data-based papers that test hypotheses about groups. Theory papers and literature reviews will be published, provided they meet the standards set by such journals as Psychological Review and Psychological Bulletin.

Other types of papers, such as manuscripts that describe innovations and applications in group contexts that do not include evaluative data pertaining to the effectiveness of the intervention, will be reviewed for publication, but such papers should be submitted in the form of brief reports. All papers to be accepted for publication must make a definitive contribution to theory, research, or practice.

Brief Reports

The Journal publishes brief reports, such as single-experiment studies that do not require extensive theoretical introduction, case studies, reports of therapeutic innovations, and theoretical commentaries about specific issues. When possible, qualitative or quantitative evidence of the impact and effectiveness of therapeutic techniques should be included in reports of such interventions.

Brief reports must conform to the Publication Manual standards, but the manuscript itself cannot exceed 18 pages, including references, tables, and figures. Unsolicited book reviews will not be accepted.

Manuscript Preparation

Prepare manuscripts according to the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th edition). Manuscripts may be copyedited for bias-free language (see Chapter 3 of the Publication Manual).

Review APA's Checklist for Manuscript Submission before submitting your article.

Full-length manuscripts should not exceed 8,000 words total (including cover page, abstract, text, references, tables, and figures). If the manuscript exceeds 8,000 words, the author should explain in his or her cover letter why the requirement could not be met.

Double-space all copy. Other formatting instructions, as well as instructions on preparing tables, figures, references, metrics, and abstracts, appear in the Manual.

Below are additional instructions regarding the preparation of display equations, computer code, and tables.

Display Equations

We strongly encourage you to use MathType (third-party software) or Equation Editor 3.0 (built into pre-2007 versions of Word) to construct your equations, rather than the equation support that is built into Word 2007 and Word 2010. Equations composed with the built-in Word 2007/Word 2010 equation support are converted to low-resolution graphics when they enter the production process and must be rekeyed by the typesetter, which may introduce errors.

To construct your equations with MathType or Equation Editor 3.0:

  • Go to the Text section of the Insert tab and select Object.
  • Select MathType or Equation Editor 3.0 in the drop-down menu.

If you have an equation that has already been produced using Microsoft Word 2007 or 2010 and you have access to the full version of MathType 6.5 or later, you can convert this equation to MathType by clicking on MathType Insert Equation. Copy the equation from Microsoft Word and paste it into the MathType box. Verify that your equation is correct, click File, and then click Update. Your equation has now been inserted into your Word file as a MathType Equation.

Use Equation Editor 3.0 or MathType only for equations or for formulas that cannot be produced as Word text using the Times or Symbol font.

Computer Code

Because altering computer code in any way (e.g., indents, line spacing, line breaks, page breaks) during the typesetting process could alter its meaning, we treat computer code differently from the rest of your article in our production process. To that end, we request separate files for computer code.

In Online Supplemental Material
We request that runnable source code be included as supplemental material to the article. For more information, visit Supplementing Your Article With Online Material.

In the Text of the Article
If you would like to include code in the text of your published manuscript, please submit a separate file with your code exactly as you want it to appear, using Courier New font with a type size of 8 points. We will make an image of each segment of code in your article that exceeds 40 characters in length. (Shorter snippets of code that appear in text will be typeset in Courier New and run in with the rest of the text.) If an appendix contains a mix of code and explanatory text, please submit a file that contains the entire appendix, with the code keyed in 8-point Courier New.

Tables

Use Word's Insert Table function when you create tables. Using spaces or tabs in your table will create problems when the table is typeset and may result in errors.

Submitting Supplemental Materials

APA can place supplemental materials online, available via the published article in the PsycARTICLES® database. Please see Supplementing Your Article With Online Material for more details.

Abstract and Keywords

All manuscripts must include an abstract containing a maximum of 250 words typed on a separate page. After the abstract, please supply up to five keywords or brief phrases.

References

List references in alphabetical order. Each listed reference should be cited in text, and each text citation should be listed in the References section.

Examples of basic reference formats:

  • Journal Article:
    Hughes, G., Desantis, A., & Waszak, F. (2013). Mechanisms of intentional binding and sensory attenuation: The role of temporal prediction, temporal control, identity prediction, and motor prediction. Psychological Bulletin, 139, 133–151. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0028566
  • Authored Book:
    Rogers, T. T., & McClelland, J. L. (2004). Semantic cognition: A parallel distributed processing approach. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Chapter in an Edited Book:
    Gill, M. J., & Sypher, B. D. (2009). Workplace incivility and organizational trust. In P. Lutgen-Sandvik & B. D. Sypher (Eds.), Destructive organizational communication: Processes, consequences, and constructive ways of organizing (pp. 53–73). New York, NY: Taylor & Francis.

Figures

Graphics files are welcome if supplied as Tiff or EPS files. Multipanel figures (i.e., figures with parts labeled a, b, c, d, etc.) should be assembled into one file.

The minimum line weight for line art is 0.5 point for optimal printing.

For more information about acceptable resolutions, fonts, sizing, and other figure issues, please see the general guidelines.

When possible, please place symbol legends below the figure instead of to the side.

APA offers authors the option to publish their figures online in color without the costs associated with print publication of color figures.

The same caption will appear on both the online (color) and print (black and white) versions. To ensure that the figure can be understood in both formats, authors should add alternative wording (e.g., "the red (dark gray) bars represent") as needed.

For authors who prefer their figures to be published in color both in print and online, original color figures can be printed in color at the editor's and publisher's discretion provided the author agrees to pay:

  • $900 for one figure
  • An additional $600 for the second figure
  • An additional $450 for each subsequent figure

Permissions

Authors of accepted papers must obtain and provide to the editor on final acceptance all necessary permissions to reproduce in print and electronic form any copyrighted work, including test materials (or portions thereof), photographs, and other graphic images (including those used as stimuli in experiments).

On advice of counsel, APA may decline to publish any image whose copyright status is unknown.

Publication Policies

APA policy prohibits an author from submitting the same manuscript for concurrent consideration by two or more publications.

See also APA Journals® Internet Posting Guidelines.

APA requires authors to reveal any possible conflict of interest in the conduct and reporting of research (e.g., financial interests in a test or procedure, funding by pharmaceutical companies for drug research).

Authors of accepted manuscripts are required to transfer the copyright to APA.

Ethical Principles

It is a violation of APA Ethical Principles to publish "as original data, data that have been previously published" (Standard 8.13).

In addition, APA Ethical Principles specify that "after research results are published, psychologists do not withhold the data on which their conclusions are based from other competent professionals who seek to verify the substantive claims through reanalysis and who intend to use such data only for that purpose, provided that the confidentiality of the participants can be protected and unless legal rights concerning proprietary data preclude their release" (Standard 8.14).

APA expects authors to adhere to these standards. Specifically, APA expects authors to have their data available throughout the editorial review process and for at least 5 years after the date of publication.

Authors are required to state in writing that they have complied with APA ethical standards in the treatment of their sample, human or animal, or to describe the details of treatment.

The APA Ethics Office provides the full Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct electronically on its website in HTML, PDF, and Word format. You may also request a copy by emailing or calling the APA Ethics Office (202-336-5930). You may also read "Ethical Principles," December 1992, American Psychologist, Vol. 47, pp. 1597–1611.

Other Information

Special Issues
  • Prevention Groups

    Special issue of the APA journal Group Dynamics, Vol. 14, No. 3, September 2010. Focusing on prevention groups, the issue includes articles about their history, effectiveness, and use in various populations and settings.

  • Evolutionary Approaches to Group Dynamics

    Special issue of the APA journal Group Dynamics, Vol. 12, No. 1, March 2008. Includes articles about social networks; group-level evolutionary adaptations; interpersonal and intergroup aggression; social exclusion; and cooperation in large-scale groups.

  • Groups in Educational Settings

    Special issue of the APA journal Group Dynamics: Theory, Research, and Practice, Vol. 11, No. 4, December 2007. Includes articles about Glasser quality school; group approaches to reducing aggression and bullying; the efficacy of using music in children of divorce groups; student success skills; counseling and psychotherapy groups; and schools as team-based organizations.

  • Groups and the Internet

    Special issue of the APA journal Group Dynamics: Theory, Research, and Practice, Vol. 6, No. 1, March 2002. Includes articles about effects of depersonalization in computer-mediated communication; a model of the effects of identifiability on communicative behavior; attachment and normative behavior in chats; gender differences in computer-mediated interpersonal influence; face-to-face and computer-mediated team decision making; differences between social- and cyberostracism; social influences in e-mail negotiations; and virtual group dynamics.

  • Group-Based Interventions for Trauma Survivors

    Special issue of the APA journal Group Dynamics: Theory, Research and Practice, Vol. 5, No. 4, December 2001. Includes articles about treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder with comorbid panic attacks; therapy for bereaved adults and children following an air disaster; school-based postwar intervention with traumatized Bosnian adolescents; intervention for adolescents exposed to community violence; and exploring responses to catastrophes.

  • 100 Years of Groups Research

    Special issue of the journal Group Dynamics: Theory, Research and Practice, Vol. 4, No. 1, March 2000. Includes articles about group cohesion, leadership, work groups, social influence, intergroup conflict, and group psychotherapy.

  • Research Methods

    Special issue of the APA journal Group Dynamics: Theory, Research and Practice, Vol. 2, No. 4, December 1998. Includes articles about meta-analysis; the social relations model; measurement of consensual beliefs; focus group discussions as a research method; structural analysis of group arguments; efficacy as an example of a multilevel model; and hierarchical linear modeling in group dynamics research.