How I Learn: A Kid's Guide to Learning Disability

Pages: 32, Color
Size: 8" x 10"
Age Range: 4-8
Item #: 441B153
ISBN: 978-1-4338-1660-4
List Price: $14.95
Publication Date: August 2014
Format: Hardcover
Other Format: Softcover
Availability: In Stock
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For individuals in the U.S. & U.S. territories

 
Overview

I like school, but sometimes I get confused.
That's because I learn in a different way.
But guess what? That's OK.

How I Learn introduces the concept of a learning disability in concrete terms for younger students. This supportive and upbeat story reassures readers that they are capable, and can use "smart strategies" to help themselves learn.

And that's better than OK. That's GREAT!

A Note to Parents, Caregivers, and Professionals is included, with suggestions to guide discussion and help children identify their particular strengths and challenges.

About the Authors

Brenda S. Miles, PhD, is a clinical pediatric neuropsychologist who has worked in hospital, rehabilitation, and school settings. She is particularly interested in evidence-based interventions and brain plasticity in the remediation of learning challenges. Her first book for children, Imagine a Rainbow: A Child's Guide for Soothing Pain, was published by Magination Press in 2006.

Colleen A. Patterson, MA, is a psychologist who has worked in the field of school and clinical psychology for the past 20 years. She is an advocate for students with learning challenges within the educational system. How I Learn: A Kid's Guide to Learning Disability is her first book.

About the Illustrator

Jane Heinrichs studied illustration at Camberwell College of Arts in London, England. She loves drawing, reading, and huge chocolate sundaes. Her first book, Magic at the Museum, was short-listed for "Best-Illustrated Book" at the Manitoba Book Awards.

Reviews & Awards

The authors present some excellent strategies for students and parents in a gentle, accessible manner.
School Library Journal

How I Learn will serve as an important resource for children in helping them understand their experiences with a learning disability. The language used is appropriate, supportive, and friendly, and will make this story very approachable and readable for its intended child audience.
Educational and School Psychology Newsletter