Christian Counseling

Format: DVD
Running Time: Over 100 minutes
Item #: 4310744
ISBN: 978-1-59147-375-6
List Price: $99.95
Member/Affiliate Price: $69.95
Copyright: 2006
Availability: In Stock
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For individuals in the U.S. & U.S. territories

APA Psychotherapy Training Videos are intended solely for educational purposes for mental health professionals. Viewers are expected to treat confidential material found herein according to strict professional guidelines. Unauthorized viewing is prohibited.
Description

In Christian Counseling, Dr. Mark R. McMinn provides an example of his relational cognitive therapy from a Christian perspective. This form of therapy is based on scientific evidence for the effectiveness of cognitive therapy with an underlying Christian metaphysic.

In this session, Dr. McMinn works with an African American woman who is married and has three children, all of whom are under the age of 10. She works full-time, attends graduate school, and is very active in her church. She feels burned out trying to do everything for everybody and finds herself without much social support. Mark uses scripture as well as meditation and prayer to help her to understand the pressure that she is putting on herself, and to find ways to relieve this pressure.

Approach

Dr. McMinn uses relational cognitive therapy from a Christian perspective. All psychotherapies begin with particular worldview assumptions—typically a complex amalgam of science and metaphysics. The approach shown on this video demonstrates a relational approach to cognitive therapy based on scientific evidence for the effectiveness of cognitive therapy with an underlying Christian metaphysic. A Christian worldview begins with the assumption that God created and loves humanity, that all aspects of our world are tainted by the effects of sin, and that God is active in healing and restoring that which is broken.

Relational cognitive therapy from a Christian perspective can be used with a wide variety of clients, regardless of their religious views. The goal is not religious persuasion, but psychological growth and spiritual awareness. As with all psychotherapies, this approach begins with certain worldview assumptions that may influence clients' beliefs and values over the course of psychotherapy. These worldview assumptions should be disclosed to clients early in therapy during the informed consent process.

This therapy can be used with a wide variety of clients, but not by a wide range of therapists. Therapists who use this approach need to have training in relational and cognitive therapies as well as a clear understanding of a Christian worldview.

About the Therapist

Mark R. McMinn, PhD, received his doctorate in clinical psychology in 1983 from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, TN. He is currently the Rech Professor of Psychology at Wheaton College in Wheaton, IL, where he teaches in their American Psychological Association (APA) accredited doctoral program in clinical psychology and coordinates the Center for Church–Psychology Collaboration.

Dr. McMinn has authored more than 100 articles and chapters, and is author, coauthor, or coeditor of 12 books, including Psychology and the Church (2005), Finding Our Way Home (2005), Care for the Soul (with T. R. Phillips; 2001), and Psychology, Theology, and Spirituality in Christian Counseling (1996).

He is a licensed psychologist, board certified by the American Board of Professional Psychology, and a fellow of Division 36 (Psychology of Religion), where he has been active in various leadership positions.

Suggested Readings
  • McMinn, M. R., & Campbell, C. D. (2007). Integrative psychotherapy: A Christian model of cognitive and relational counseling. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press.
  • McMinn, M. R., & Phillips, T. R. (Eds.). (2001). Care for the soul. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press.
  • McMinn, M. R. (1996). Psychology, theology, and spirituality in Christian counseling. Wheaton, IL: Tyndale House Publishers.

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