Results 110 of 229 for "Magazine Article"X related to "Judicial notebook--Questions..."

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  • 1.Can jurors’ religious biases affect verdicts in criminal trials?
    Research indicates that information associating Muslims with negative attributes can create implicit biases that are difficult to detect.
    Magazine Article - Monitor on Psychology (July 2010)
  • 2.Public trials, private lives and jury questionnaires
    Social science can inform a range of issues raised by the legal struggle to balance juror privacy against the public’s right of access.
    Magazine Article - Monitor on Psychology (June 2012)
  • 3.Would somebody please wake up juror number five?
    As judicial reforms begin to deal with our technology- and entertainment-driven culture, more research is needed to fully understand juror attention.
    Magazine Article - Monitor on Psychology (September 2010)
  • 4.Does the jury have questions for the witness?
    Jurors in the Jodi Arias trial had the opportunity to ask questions during the trial, a privilege not all states allow.
    Magazine Article - Monitor on Psychology (February 2014)
  • 5.Did an Enron defendant get a fair trial in Houston?
    Psychological research suggests that prospective jurors may not be aware of the biasing effects of publicity.
    Magazine Article - Monitor on Psychology (June 2010)
  • 6.‘Thanks for the recommendation, but I’d rather kill him’
    Judicial Notebook column focusing on capital juries, judicial overrides and the death penalty.
    Magazine Article - Monitor on Psychology (September 2011)
  • 7.What did he say? Mistranslations in the court
    Research is needed to determine what impact non-English-speaking people will have on the legal system.
    Magazine Article - Monitor on Psychology (March 2012)
  • 8.A look at expert testimony on false confessions
    Researchers in psychology can assist courts by defining and clarifying the probative and prejudicial nature of this “expert” testimony.
    Magazine Article - Monitor on Psychology (March 2013)
  • 9.Suspect identifications and due process
    Memory is a reconstructive process; thus, once it is altered by a suggestive identification procedure, it is unlikely that the eyewitness’s original memory can be restored.
    Magazine Article - Monitor on Psychology (October 2012)
  • 10.Neither admit nor deny
    Some argue the “no admit or deny” policy allows defendants to escape public accountability and that settlements are not fair tothose who lost money because the defendant is not forced to admit wrongdoing.
    Magazine Article - Monitor on Psychology (September 2013)
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Results 110 of 229 for "Magazine Article"X related to "Judicial notebook--Questions..."