Results 110 of 22 for "Review"X related to "Also in this Issue - Science Policy..."
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  • 1.The Brain That Changes Itself: Stories of Personal Triumph From the Frontiers of Science (Book Review)
    Doidge takes the reader by the hand and carefully explains that the brain can and does change throughout life. Contrary to the original belief that after childhood the brain begins a long process of decline, he shows us that our brains have the remarkable power to grow, change, overcome disabilities, learn, recover, and alter the very culture that has the potential to deeply affect human nature.
    Review (January 2011)
  • 2.Textbook of Psychoanalysis (Book Review)
    This introduction and reference source is intended to be of use to anyone interested in psychoanalysis - from all levels of mental health students to experienced clinicians, it covers a broad range of up-to-date topics, including: theories of the mind; theories of psychopathology; treatment; research; and current issues.
    Review
  • 3.Under the Skin (Book Review)
    This book is unique as an in depth psychoanalytic study of body modification, and needs to be recognized and commended for its insightfulness and the comprehensive integration of psychoanalysis with cultural studies, literature, art and film.
    Review (January 2011)
  • 4.Sex On The Couch: What Freud Has to Teach Us About Sex and Gender (Book Review)
    Aan extensive discussion of sexuality in its different forms, both real and imaginary. There are both real and the imaginary forms of sexual differentiation, and the distinction is not always easy to make; but what strikes the reader in Boothby’s book is the description of certain characterizations of how the two sexes differ in their behaviors; sometimes these two aspects of reality look like sketches or even caricatures of what it means to be male or female.
    Review
  • 5.The Age of Insight: The Quest to Understand the Unconscious in Art, Mind, and Brain, from Vienna 1900 to the Present
    Mark Stafford offers a review of this book which references the dynamic level of exchange between science and art in Vienna, and the insight contemporary neuroscientists have about the relation of the brain to the psychic experience.
    Review
  • 6.Affect Regulation and the Repair of the Self and Affect Dysregulation and Disorders of the Self (Book Review)
    Much of his work over the last decade is reproduced in this newly edited pair of books. Together they contain 17 chapters, five of which are versions of chapters previously published in edited books, and ten of which previously appeared in some form in various journals; only two chapters and one extraordinary Appendix appear to have been produced specifically for this set.
    Review
  • 7.All Things Shining: Reading the Western Classics to Find Meaning in a Secular Age (Book Review)
    The authors re-envision modern spiritual life through the examination of literature, philosophy, and religious testimony, and teach us how to rediscover the sacred, shining things that surround us every day.
    Review
  • 8.Bullying: Experiences and Discourses of Sexuality and Gender (Book Review)
    Bullying and its newer transformation, cyberbullying, has been studied since the 1990s, but you would never know that by looking at school policies and procedures regarding bullying and various other forms of harassment.
    Review (January 2014)
  • 9.Thinking in Circles: An Essay on Ring Composition (Book Review)
    Our current view of time is so linear that we do not realize how much it organizes our thinking about the mind. Ring composition, however, implies a more circular view of time. In analysis, we do have many clinical observations and theories that, whether we realize it or not, allude to a more circular view of time.
    Review
  • 10.Sensuality and Sexuality Across the Divide of Shame (Book Review)
    Mace, Moorey, and Roberts are British psychiatrists who have assembled diverse authors to illuminate and critique the state of thinking about empirically validated treatments (EVTs). The collection of essays under review is a critique: the contributors are less interested in weighing the inventory of what we know and are much more interested in puzzling over what it is we are thinking about.
    Review (January 2011)
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Results 110 of 22 for "Review"X related to "Also in this Issue - Science Policy..."