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Early Researcher Awards Announced

The APA Science Student Council Early Research Award is an annual competition for early research, the purpose of which is to reward an outstanding student research project completed before the dissertation.

By Amy Test

Now in its second year, the APA Science Student Council Early Research Award is an annual competition for early research, the purpose of which is to reward an outstanding student research project completed before the dissertation. More than 100 highly-qualified applicants submitted their research for consideration for the 2005 awards. After careful review, the Science Student Council awarded two $1,000 awards: $1,000 for an award in basic science, and $1,000 for applied science. In addition, three honorable mention awards of $100 each were granted, two for basic science and one for applied science.

Kyle Smith and Adam Grant were selected as the 2005 winners of the APA Science Student Council's Early Research Awards. Smith, a fourth-year graduate student in biopsychology at the University of Michigan, received the $1,000 Early Research Award for Basic Science for his study entitled The Ventral Pallidum and Hedonic Reward: Neurochemical Maps of Sucrose "Liking" and Eating. Focusing on how brain systems generate sensations of pleasure and desire, Smith's research has important implications for major social problems, such as eating disorders and substance abuse. The $1,000 Early Research Award for Applied Science went to Grant, also a graduate student at the University of Michigan. His study, Beneficiaries and the Art of Motivation Maintenance: The Impact of Relational Work Design on Persistence Behavior, addresses increasing employee motivation through work redesign. By proposing a change in the way employees have direct contact with the beneficiaries of their work, Grant has shown how motivation can be increased through greater contact between employees and beneficiaries.

Due to the outstanding response to this year's competition and the exceptional quality of the applicants, the Science Student Council also awarded three Honorable Mention awards, each for $100. Ryan Bogdan of Harvard University received an Honorable Mention in the Basic Science category for his study, Acute Stress Reduces Hedonic Capacity: Implications for Depression. A second Honorable Mention for Basic Science went to Eric John David of the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, for his study entitled The Colonial Mentality Scale (CMS) for Filipino Americans: Scale Construction and Psychological Implications. In the Applied Science category, the Honorable Mention award was given to Arizona State University student Jenessa Shapiro for her study, Expectations of Obese Trainees: How Stigmatized Trainee Characteristics Influence Training Effectiveness.

For more information about the Science Student Council and the Early Research Awards, please visit the SSC homepage. More information about the 2005 Early Research Award recipients and their research can also be found on the SSC website. Congratulations to each of the 2005 Early Research Award recipients!