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APA Recruits New Science Advocates at SPSP

Given the flattening of funding for scientific research across multiple federal agencies and criticisms from some Congressional members about behavioral research, it is more critical than ever that scientists make their voice heard on issues affecting research.

By Karen Studwell

by Karen Studwell

Karen Studwell and Heather Kelly of APA's Science Policy staff attended the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) to lead an advocacy training workshop for scientists. They provided an overview of the legislative and appropriations process and prepared participants to become more effective advocates for psychological research. Given the flattening of funding for scientific research across multiple federal agencies and criticisms from some Congressional members about behavioral research, it is more critical than ever that scientists make their voice heard on issues affecting research. After participating in the workshop, attendees were ready to engage their own Representatives and Senators in a discussion about the relevance and value of psychological research and the need for continued federal support. In the spring, some of these social and personality psychologists will meet with their Members of Congress in their home districts during a series of coordinated advocacy visits in which they will educate them about the importance of basic social and personality research within the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation.

APA's Science Policy Office covers a broad array of federal agencies and policy issues that impact psychological research. To learn more about our efforts, visit the Science Policy website.