Also in this Issue

Recipients Announced for the 2008 APF/COGDOP Graduate Research Scholarships in Psychology

The award recipients scored the highest on a variety of criteria, including their description of the context of the research, research design, and the theoretical and applied value of the study.

By Nicolle Singer

Each year since 1996, the American Psychological Foundation (APF) and the Council of Graduate Departments of Psychology (COGDOP) have jointly offered graduate research scholarships to doctoral students whose research reflects excellence in scientific psychology. The fellowships are meant to assist graduate students of psychology with research costs, and are administered by the APA Science Directorate.

Two of the major awards within the program are the $3,000 Ruth G. and Joseph D. Matarazzo Scholarship and the $2,000 Clarence J. Rosecrans Scholarship. In addition, the foundation also gives several $1,000 awards per year. All applications are reviewed by a committee of distinguished COGDOP members. The award recipients scored the highest on a variety of criteria, including their description of the context of the research, research design, and the theoretical and applied value of the study.

Arathi Sethumadhavan (Texas Tech University) received this year's $3,000 Ruth G. and Joseph D. Matarazzo Scholarship. Her proposal is "Effects of Levels of Automation on Air Traffic Controller Situation Awareness" and explores the effects of automation on situational awareness. This innovative research measures operator situation awareness after the failure of automated systems compared to situation awareness when no system failure occurs. At the intersection of human factors, cognitive, and engineering psychology, this research has the potential to improve training programs for air traffic controllers by preventing the misuse of automation.

Kristen M. Culbert (Michigan State University) received this year's the $2,000 Clarence J. Rosecrans Scholarship. Her proposal "Prenatal Testosterone and Risk for Disordered Eating During Puberty" examines symptoms of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. Past research has shown that prenatal testosterone decreases risk for disordered eating, but has not shown a mechanism for this change. Using a large archival sample of same-sex and mixed-sex twin pairs, as well as new data collected from male-female twin pairs and females raised with a near-age brother, Kristen is examining the effect of in utero testosterone on rates of disordered eating.

Additionally, the following students were awarded $1,000 APF/COGDOP Scholarships. The research pursued by these applicants reflects excellence in scientific psychology across the breadth of the discipline.

Jennifer M. Brielmaier (George Mason University) received funding for her dissertation project "Effects of Sex and Stress on Initial Nicotine Sensitivity in Adolescence: A Rat Model."

Melody Manchi Chao (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign) was awarded a scholarship for her proposal "Lay Essentialist Theory of Race: Its Implications to Social Categorization and Racial Perception."

Rachel H. Lucas-Thompson (University of California, Irvine) received an APF/COGDOP Award for her proposal "Interparental Conflict and Adolescent Physiological Functioning, Health, and Adjustment."

Melissa J. Mathews (University of Massachusetts, Amherst) received funding for her research "Cognitive Training for Older Adults: A Multi-Modal Approach to Memory Concerns."

Aimilia Papazoglou (Georgia State University) was awarded an APF/COGDOP Scholarship for her project "Medical and Neuropsychological Predictors of Adaptive Functioning in Children with Epilepsy."

Laura C. Rusch (University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee) was awarded funding for her project "The Impact of Models of Depression on Stigma and Treatment Seeking."

Brenda Jeanette Salley (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University) received an APF/COGDOP Award for her research "Relating Infants' Social Attention to their Emerging Language Skills."

Naomi Samimi Sadeh (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign) received an award for her dissertation research "Attention-Emotion Interactions in Psychopathy: Modulation of the Startle Reflex."

Julie Maria St. Cyr-Baker (Brock University) received an award for her master's research project "Cognitive and Emotional Sequelae associated with History of Mild Head Injury in University Students."

Kimberly Allison Van Orden (Florida State University) received funding for her research designing a self-report instrument to predict risk for suicide, "Construct Validity of the Interpersonal Needs Questionnaire."

Laura M. Widman (University of Tennessee) was awarded funding for her proposal "Validation of an Implicit Attitude Measure of Sexual Aggression."