From the APA Science Student Council

Experience the SSC at the APA Convention

Council has planned four unique convention sessions especially for you - the science-oriented graduate student.

By Abby Adler

Council has planned four unique convention sessions especially for you - the science-oriented graduate student. These sessions address many aspects of science graduate students' needs from the challenge of balancing work and life to learning how to network to finding grant money to presenting one's research effectively. Check out these stimulating sessions:

Achieving Balance - Integrating the Demands of Professional Life and Personal Life
Thursday, August 6, 9:00 - 9:50 am
Room 205A, Toronto Convention Centre, North Building, Room 205A

Graduate students often let their school commitments occupy their time at the expense of time with family or friends - as well as eating or sleeping. However, this doesn't have to be the case. Learn how to successfully integrate work and life from individuals who research this phenomenon as well as those who have encountered this struggle themselves. Our featured panelists include Ellen Ernst Kossek from Michigan State University, Anna Lau from the University of California, Los Angeles, and Janet Tomiyama also from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Psychological Science Superstars-Graduate and Professional-Datablitz
Saturday, August 8, 2:00 - 2:50 pm
Toronto Convention Centre, North Building, Room 104C

Presenting research is stressful enough, but imagine trying to summarize your research in 2 minutes using only 2 slides! This is the challenge that 13 graduate students and 4 professors have accepted as part of the 3rd annual Datablitz. Come cheer on your fellow students and faculty presenters while learning about cutting-edge research in many different areas of psychological science. Our featured faculty presenters include Michael Edwards from Ohio State University, Patricia Greenfield from the University of California, Los Angeles, Shevaun Neupert from North Carolina State University, and Luc Lecavalier from Ohio State University.

"Umm…Hi…." - A Professional Social Networking Guide for Graduate Students
Saturday, August 8, 3:00 - 3:50 pm
Toronto Convention Centre, South Building, Room 703

If you are relying on Facebook as your professional social networking tool, it's time for you to expand your circle and this session will be perfect for you. You will learn everything from how to start a conversation to maintaining contact with individuals in your field, as well as how to give the all-important "elevator talk," all of which are essential to landing that job after grad school. Our networking experts include Michael Edwards from Ohio State University, Connie Crosby from the University of Toronto, and Nadia Hasan from the University of Akron.

Grants and Fellowships for Graduate Students: Funding and Advocacy
Saturday, August 8, 4:00 - 4:50 pm
Toronto Convention Centre, South Building, Room 706

Finding "free" money is always an ambition for graduate students. Back by popular demand, this session will provide a behind-the-scenes look at the federal funding system and an in-depth look into the grant-writing process and aims to inspire you to apply for research grants and fellowships from the National Institutes of Health or the National Science Foundation (NSF). You'll also learn about your role in advocating for additional funding for psychological science research. Providing their particular insights into this issue are Heather Kelly from APA, Molly Wagster from the National Institute on Aging, and Kellina Craig-Henderson from NSF.

The SSC hopes to keep YOU busy at convention! To learn more about the SSC and the activities we sponsor throughout the year, be sure to visit our web site. You can also find out information about our Early Graduate Student Researcher Award, including eligibility requirements and application materials, by visiting the Science Directorate web site.

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Abby Adler is the clinical science representative on the APASSC and a graduate student at Ohio State University. Her research interests are focused on how cognitive biases, dysfunctional attitudes, and rumination change across the course of Cognitive Therapy for depression.