2014 APA Distinguished Scientist Lecturers

Sandra Graham, Lynn Hasher and Daniel Simons to be featured at regional conferences.

Psychologists Sandra Graham, Lynn Hasher and Daniel Simons have been selected as speakers for the 2014 American Psychological Association (APA) Distinguished Scientist Lecture Program  by the APA Board of Scientific Affairs. Each of these scientists will give a featured address at a regional psychological association annual meeting.

Sandra Graham Sandra Graham will speak on “Diversity Matters: Cross-ethnic Friendships in Urban Middle Schools” at the Midwestern Psychological Association meeting, which will be held in Chicago, Ill., on May 1-3. Graham is a professor and presidential chair in education and diversity in the Department of Education at the University of California, Los Angeles. In her talk, she will describe a program of research emphasizing the importance of cross-ethnic friendships. Evidence is presented that in diverse schools, cross-ethnic friendships promote better intergroup attitudes and protect against feelings of vulnerability. The unique role of biracial youth in promoting cross-ethnic friendships is also considered.



Lynn Hasher Lynn Hasher will speak on ”Distraction Regulation and Cognition” at the New England Psychological Association meeting, which will be held at Bates College in Lewiston, Maine on Oct. 17-18. Hasher is a professor of psychology at the University of Toronto and senior scientist at The Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest Centre. Her research interests cover a range of topics in cognition including circadian rhythms, cognitive neuropsychology, cognitive gerontology, attention, memory and comprehension. Her talk will focus on the surprising impact of distraction in mental life.




Daniel Simons Daniel Simons will speak on “Missing What's Missing” at the Eastern Psychological Association meeting, which will be held in Boston, Mass., on March 13-16. Simons, a professor of psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, will identify and discuss how a fundamental cognitive bias affects how we think about the workings of our own mind. He will address how this bias contributes to mistaken beliefs about perception, attention, memory and awareness and how it undergirds many of the well-studied biases in reasoning and decision-making.